In general, the components of a healthy diet don’t change terribly much over your lifespan. However, as people age, their vitamin needs change, which is a natural part of aging. Following are six vitamin checks for seniors to stay their nutritionally best from Alicia I. Arbaje, M.D., M.P.H., Assistant Professor of Medicine, and director of Transitional Care in the Research Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

 

  • man taking vitamins
    Multivitamin Check: Seniors should supplement for specific vitamin deficiencies rather than take a general overall supplement. Multivitamins are not “one size fits all.” Also, taking too much of some vitamins can be toxic. Multivitamins are synthetic and not as beneficial as eating the vitamin in its natural form...food! (Photo © Steveheap | Dreamstime.com)

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As we approach the holiday season, many of us experience extra stress in our lives. Some of our stress is due to the hectic schedules that we endure, family situations, staying healthy and eating well, or traveling. So, what can you do to lessen your stress and enjoy the holidays this year?

For stressful family situations, I recommend Happier at Home by Gretchen Rubin and A is for Attitude by Patricia Russell-McCloud.

happier home a is for attitude

If staying fit and eating well are bothering you, check out: Breaking the Food Seduction by Dr. Neal Barnard, 50 Ways to Soothe Yourself Without Food by Susan Albers, Psy.D., Crave by Cynthia M. Bulik, Ph.D., and Eating Well for Optimum Health: The Essential Guide to Food, Diet, and Nutrition.

breaking food seduction50 ways to soothe yourself without foodcraveeating well for optimum health

 

 

 

 

 

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If travel is a concern (or while you’re waiting at the airport), try some of our new services at hclibrary.org. Zinio is great for reading magazines, while Hoopla has music, audiobooks, television, and movies available. What a stress-free way to enjoy those long hours at the airport or while riding in a car! I love getting my favorite magazine through Zinio to read on my tablet.

Lastly, try journaling. Journaling is a wonderful way to relieve stress. I keep a gratitude journal beside my bed. Every night, I write five things in my journal that I am grateful for that day. I found that it helps me to sleep better at night, reduces my stress while making me more gracious for many of life’s blessings that I experience every day.

Remember, enjoy the upcoming season while building those memories to cherish with friends, family, and loved ones. Until we meet again, happy trails!

Anna Louise Downing is a Customer Service Specialist at the Miller Branch. She is an avid reader and enjoys Disney, music and her passion for running. She has been a race ambassador for several local races, is a Sweat Pink Ambassador for promoting women’s health. Follow her journey towards being physically fit with running and healthy lifestyle choices here on Well & Wise.

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calendar_2014smMonday, Dec. 8, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Savage Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. 2nd Mondays. No registration required.

Monday, Dec. 8, 6-10 p.m. Military Appreciation Night at Howard County General Hospital’s Symphony of Lights, a 20-minute drive through more than 70 larger-than-life holiday light displays in Columbia’s Symphony Woods, benefiting the hospital. Show military ID for $10 off regular admission cost.

Monday, Dec. 8, 7:00 p.m. Cutting Edge Discoveries in Neuroscience to Boost Your Brain (Part 2) at Miller Branch. As this three-part series continues, Majid Fotuhi, M.D., Ph.D., teaches how to boost brain capacity at any age. The founder and chief medical officer of NeurExpand, Fotuhi has written three books about brain health: Boost Your Brain: The New Art and Science Behind Enhanced Brain Performance; The Memory Cure; and The New York Times Crosswords to Keep Your Brain Young: The 6-Step Age-Defying Program. Fotuhi received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School and his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His research findings have been published in The Journal of Neuroscience, The Lancet, Nature, Neurology, Neuron, and The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Fotuhi has been featured on PBS, The Dr. Oz Show, CNN, Discovery Channel, NBC’s TODAY show, and numerous other national media. Registration Required.

Tuesday, Dec. 9, 10:30 a.m. I’m Going to Be a Big Brother or Sister at Glenwood Branch. Prepare for the arrival of a baby in this class for new siblings. Enjoy stories, activities, and bring a favorite doll or stuffed animal to practice holding your baby. Resources for parents, too. Families; 30 – 45 min. In partnership with Howard County General Hospital: A Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. Registration is required. Register online or by calling 410.313.5579.

Tuesday, Dec. 9, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Elkridge Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

Tuesday, Dec. 9, 4:15-6:15 p.m. Twinkling Tots is a walk through Columbia’s Symphony of Lights for families with young children. Experience the 1.4 mile lighted path of more than 70 larger-than-life holiday light displays at this event that benefits Howard County General Hospital. Children in strollers and wagons are welcome.

Wednesday, Dec. 10, 10 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Free Medicare 101 presentation to review Original Medicare (Part A Hospital and Part B Medical) and Prescription Drug Coverage (Part D). Learn what is covered, your costs, how Medicare works and available benefit programs in Howard County General Hospital’s Wellness Center. Register here. A Medicare 102 session is available on Dec. 17.

Thursday, Dec. 11, 5:30-9 p.m. $55 Adult, Child and Infant CPR/AED will teach you the skills needed to clear an airway obstruction, perform CPR and how to use an AED. At the successful completion of this course, you will earn a two-year American Heart Association completion card. Located in the Howard County General Hospital Wellness Center.

Monday, Dec. 15, 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Glenwood Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

Monday, Dec. 15, 4-5:45 p.m. Due to inclement weather, Bike the Lights in Columbia’s Symphony of Lights has been rescheduled for Dec. 15. Experience the lighted path of these larger-than-life holiday displays on two wheels at this Howard County General Hospital benefit event. Bikers of all ages and abilities welcome; non-bikers may walk with bikers through the 1.4 mile course. You can also take a 20-minute drive through the lights nightly from 6 to 10 p.m. through Jan. 4, 2015 (closed for walk-through events on Tuesdays and Dec. 31). Drive-through Admission is $20 per car or van up to eight. $5 off coupon.

Wednesday, Dec. 17, 10:15 a.m. I’m Going to Be a Big Brother or Sister at Savage Branch. Prepare for the arrival of a baby in this class for new siblings. Enjoy stories, activities, and bring a favorite doll or stuffed animal to practice holding your baby. Resources for parents, too. Families; 30 – 45 min. Ticket required.In partnership with Howard County General Hospital: A Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. Limited space; tickets available at Children’s Desk 15 minutes before class.


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It’s upon us again – the resplendence and clamor of the holiday season.

Panic (admit it), set in back in October when Target brought out their windfall of mini lights. And then, there are those lavender Uggs – size 6 – you simply cannot find. The ones (if you don’t get them for her) your fourteen-year-old will remember her whole adult life. Football and menfolk will soon have squatter’s rights to the big screen in the living room. You’ll endure ear-deafening touchdowns, Velveeta on the new down pillows, and some nimrod always gives the dog the last of the chili with beans. From the kitchen you stare darkly at the remains of Aunt Celeste’s Waldorf Salad. Aunt Celeste, who’s now decided to stay through New Year’s. We won’t discuss the bathroom scale.

“Your brain,” says Scientific American, “is telling you to STOP! It’s full. It needs some downtime.”
But how to retreat from the holiday madness?
It’s as simple as black and white… the creature comfort of a feel-good book.
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  • Lottery by Patricia Wood
    Lottery by Patricia Wood -- Perry L. Crandall (L. is for “Lucky”) is a mildly retarded young optimist who, as the sudden winner of the twelve million dollar Washington State Lottery, is just as suddenly everyone’s best friend!
Aimee Zuccarini is an Instructor & Research Specialist at the East Columbia Branch. She facilitates several book discussions and writes the book reviews for The Maryland Women’s Journal.

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Women often think that when they become pregnant, they must eat for two, and end up consuming too many calories. Typically, a pregnancy weight gain of 25 to 35 pounds is recommended for a normal weight woman, according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Women are encouraged to enter pregnancy at a healthy weight. Also, if you are significantly overweight, you should gain less during your pregnancy. Following are six keys toward making your pregnancy more healthful and nutritious.

 

  • nutrition and early pregnancy
    According to Teresa Love, a registered dietitian on staff at Howard County General Hospital, “To maintain a healthy pregnancy, expecting mothers should only be adding 150 calories a day and 2-3 oz. of additional protein (meat, cheese or eggs) in the first trimester. [© Michaeljung | Dreamstime.com]


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desktopAre you, like me, still recovering from the overeating, carbfest known as Thanksgiving? Rich mashed potatoes, candied veggies (only on Thanksgiving can we justify candying our vegetables) buttery rolls, whipped cream on a slice of pie… (sorry, lost myself there for a moment). After that kind of meal, the last thing on your mind is probably dairy, but let me throw an unlikely word (composed of two dreaded words) out there: Buttermilk.

Despite its name, buttermilk (traditionally, the liquid left after churning milk to butter) has fewer calories than whole milk (99 calories in a cup to whole milk’s 157) and less fat (2.2 grams vs. 9 grams per cup). So, buttermilk is generally better for you than regular milk, having just as much calcium and being more easily digestible. Buttermilk is also believed to aid in overall digestion. This is mainly attributed to the fact that it is an excellent source of probiotics. If you’ve heard “probiotic” tossed around quite a bit but were never really quite sure what it referred to, MedlinePlus explains that it’s a “preparation (as a dietary supplement) containing live bacteria (as lactobacilli) that is taken orally to restore beneficial bacteria to the body; also: a bacterium in such a preparation.” And, for those of you keeping track, probiotics are my new best friends since my run-in with C. Diff last year.

Buttermilk has things besides just probiotics going for it. As mentioned, it still has plenty of calcium (284 milligrams per cup). There’s also phosphorus, riboflavin, and potassium in there. And for those of you looking to boost energy, there’s 8 grams of protein and 12 grams of carbohydrates in one cup of buttermilk. It has also been suggested that buttermilk consumption might be associated with reduced cholesterol. Buttermilk is also believed to be helpful against dehydration, boost immunity, and benefit skin.

hungry girl 300 under 300 breakfast lunch dinnerButtermilk frequently comes up as a replacement for richer dairy products in heart-healthy recipes. That doesn’t mean it still doesn’t have a dark side. It pops up in such deliciously naughty books as Fried & True: More Than 50 recipes for America’s Best Fried Chicken & Sides (although I make a pretty tasty oven-fried chicken with buttermilk that I got from Mark Bittman’s How to Cook Everything) and a lovely and tempting book simply called Buttermilk: A Savor the South Cookbook. But, to defend buttermilk’s newly won reputation, it also features in books such as Hungry Girl 300 Under 300: 300 Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Recipes Under 300 Calories and Deliciously G-Free: Food so Flavorful They’ll Never Believe It’s Gluten Free. So, unless you are dairy-free, you may want to give the deceptively named buttermilk a second look.

Joanne Sobieck-Lingg is glad to blog about her many, disparate interests (though expert in none, except maybe parenthetical asides). In past lives, she was a writer, proofreader, editor, project manager, teacher, and even co-coordinator of a certain health blog. She has been happily ensconced among the fiction and teen books at the Central Branch of HCLS since 2003.

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calendar_2014smMonday, Dec. 1, 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Glenwood Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

Monday, Dec. 1, 7:00 p.m. Calming Crafts at Miller Branch. Research shows that creative activities can boost serotonin levels. Join us as we use artistic expression to improve our moods. All levels of artistic ability welcome. Registration is required. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

Bike the Lights in Columbia’s Symphony Woods on Tuesday, Dec. 2, 4:15-6:15 p.m. Experience the lighted path of 70 larger-than-life holiday light displays on two wheels at Howard County General Hospital’s Symphony of Lights. Bikers of all ages and abilities welcome; non-bikers may walk with bikers through the 1.4 mile course. You can also take a 20-minute drive through the lights nightly from 6 to 10 p.m. through Jan. 4, 2015 (closed for walk-through events on Tuesdays and Dec. 31). Drive-through Admission is $20 per car or van up to eight. $5 off coupon.

Monday, Dec. 8, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Savage Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. 2nd Mondays. No registration required.

Monday, Dec. 8, 7:00 p.m. Cutting Edge Discoveries in Neuroscience to Boost Your Brain (Part 2) at Miller Branch. As this three-part series continues, Majid Fotuhi, M.D., Ph.D., teaches how to boost brain capacity at any age. The founder and chief medical officer of NeurExpand, Fotuhi has written three books about brain health: Boost Your Brain: The New Art and Science Behind Enhanced Brain Performance; The Memory Cure; and The New York Times Crosswords to Keep Your Brain Young: The 6-Step Age-Defying Program. Fotuhi received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School and his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His research findings have been published in The Journal of Neuroscience, The Lancet, Nature, Neurology, Neuron, and The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Fotuhi has been featured on PBS, The Dr. Oz Show, CNN, Discovery Channel, NBC’s TODAY show, and numerous other national media. Registration Required.

Tuesday, Dec. 9, 10:30 a.m. I’m Going to Be a Big Brother or Sister at Glenwood Branch. Prepare for the arrival of a baby in this class for new siblings. Enjoy stories, activities, and bring a favorite doll or stuffed animal to practice holding your baby. Resources for parents, too. Families; 30 – 45 min. In partnership with Howard County General Hospital: A Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. Registration is required. Register online or by calling 410.313.5579.

Tuesday, Dec. 9, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Elkridge Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

 


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