caffeine side effects

[© Kjetil Kolbjornsrud | Dreamstime.com]

Do you use caffeine to help wake up in the morning or perk up in the evening? If the answer is yes, you are not alone. Millions of people use caffeine on a daily basis. According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, “caffeine is the most mood-altering drug in the world.”

On average, Americans consume about 280 milligrams of caffeine daily—about 30 milligrams alters mood and behavior and 100 milligrams can result in physical dependence. So how many cups of coffee a day is too much? The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warns that four to seven cups of coffee is too much, however, everyone can be affected differently.

If you consume too much caffeine on a daily basis, side effects can include insomnia, nervousness, irritability, upset stomach, rapid heartbeat, muscle tremors and restlessness. Those who do not consume caffeine on a regular basis may be more sensitive and experience negative effects faster. Also, factors such as age, gender (females are more prone), medications and body mass can play a role in sensitivity.

The recent buzz
In recent years, caffeine use has been on the rise, and the industry is responding to Americans’ obsession with caffeine. While caffeine was typically consumed through coffee, tea, cola beverages and chocolate, more recently, caffeine can be found in all shapes and sizes—from energy drinks and pills, to powder you can mix into food and caffeinated gum. This addiction has become increasingly easier to form.

The addition of these products to the market has dramatically impacted public health, with thousands of caffeine overdoses, addiction and, in rare instances, death. The FDA has stepped in to warn people about the risks involved with consuming too much caffeine and has also banned various new, dangerous caffeinated products.

It’s not all perks
Caffeine can also be especially dangerous to those with existing health conditions. According to the FDA, “People with heart problems shouldn’t use caffeine because it makes their hearts work too hard.” Additionally, “People with anxiety problems or panic attacks may find that caffeine makes them feel worse.”

If you are one of the many caffeinated people out there, it is important that you monitor how much caffeine is in the food and drinks you consume and listen to your body if you think you could be experiencing a reaction or withdrawal. Speak with your primary care doctor about your caffeine intake to see what is right for you.


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trio booksAs you may already know, the Central Branch of HCLS closed its doors for an exciting three-month renovation (it’s going to be so cool when it reopens!). Central team members have been temporarily relocated to the East Columbia and Miller Branches during this time. Both East Columbia and Miller have been welcoming and accommodating beyond belief. Moving, however, is never without stress, confusion, and a bit of nerves. It occurred to me, as an adult woman, that if a temporary move into a more-than-friendly territory gives me the jitters, then a young person encountering his or her first move into a new home must be completely freaked out.

So if you’re getting ready to move and you’ve lost your mind (as well as your keys and match to every other sock) in a slew of boxes, and you haven’t accidentally packed the kids, then they may be just as stressed out, if not more so, than you. The first thing you can do is head to the library and pick up some books that might ameliorate your kids’ unease.

peanut butter and cupcakeOne of my favorites out of the gate is one from our Summer Reading 2015 picks, Peanut Butter & Cupcake by Terry Border. A simple tale about newly transplanted Peanut Butter who wanders around his new town with a soccer ball looking for a new friend to play with. Don’t be fooled by the simplicity and humor of this story; one of the biggest fears of a child who is moving is finding new friends.

lenny and lucyContinuing with the theme of friendship, but also focusing on the anxiety caused by how “scary” a new place can be, is the charming Lenny & Lucy by Phillip C. Stead. This American Library Association Notable Books for Children pick and Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year for 2015 will reassure your kids that their feelings are perfectly normal and that things will get easier.

before i leaveBefore I Leave by Jessixa Bagley takes a different tack. This sweetly sad picture book focuses on the fear of leaving behind a beloved friend with a new move. And the heartwarming Ice in the Jungle by Ariane Hofmann-Maniyar touches on the loss of the familiar and how alien a new place can seem. While Eve Bunting’s Yard Sale explores the theme of loss even more deeply as the main character must watch her family sell off some of their possessions to move from a house to an apartment. And if you want a book that that’s less of a story and more of an aid to help you start a conversation about the fears your child may be having about the move, then a nonfiction book such as Moving by Caitie McAneney might be what’s needed.

trio books 2This is just a drop in the bucket of books covering this topic (a catalog search on moving, household will give you many more options). We even have some books for the older kids such as Seven Dead Pirates by Linda Bailey for middle grade readers (if you think moving is hard, try moving into a house occupied by the ghosts of seven pirates). There’s also Tell Me Three Things by Julie Buxbaum for teens (about a teen grappling with grief, navigating a new school and step-family, and corresponding online with a mysterious new “friend”). Or maybe a graphic novel such as Lost in NYC: A Subway Adventure by Nadja Speigelman will provide some comfort.

Moving, at any age, can be a trying experience. A book might bring a sense of peace (or at least help alleviate some of the loneliness and anxiety) for a kid. Even adults need support and comfort during a move. That being said, if you get a chance, I hope you’ll swing by the East Columbia Branch and say hi to me sometime during the next three months.

Joanne Sobieck-Lingg is glad to blog about her many, disparate interests (though expert in none, except maybe parenthetical asides). In past lives, she was a writer, proofreader, editor, project manager, teacher, and even co-coordinator of a certain health blog. She has been happily ensconced among the fiction and teen books at the Central Branch of HCLS since 2003.

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anemia and your heart

[© Skypixel | Dreamstime.com] Some common anemia symptoms include lack of color in the skin, increased heart rate, fatigue, headaches, and irregular or delayed menstruation. When anemia is left untreated or is severe, it can affect your whole body—especially your heart.

Many people suffer from anemia but do not realize how it can affect your heart’s function. Anemia can cause your heart to work harder to pump blood and result in a rapid or irregular heartbeat.

What is Anemia?
Anemia is a common blood disorder that occurs when there are fewer red blood cells than normal, or there is a low concentration of hemoglobin in the blood. “Anemia stems from a variety of conditions,” says Karl Kasamon, M.D., a hematologist on staff at Howard County General Hospital, “but the most common cause is iron deficiency.” Common symptoms include lack of color in the skin, eyes and lips, increased heart rate, fatigue, breathlessness, irritability, headaches, irregular or delayed menstruation and jaundice.

“Those at the highest risk for anemia are menstruating females and generally elderly patients who have gastrointestinal related blood loss or bleeding,” says Dr. Kasamon. When anemia is left untreated or is severe, it can affect your whole body—especially your heart.

“The connection between anemia and heart complications is clear,” says Dr. Kasamon. “Red blood cells carry oxygen from lungs to tissues. When your red blood cells are low (you are anemic), your heart has to pump and carry blood cells much faster to deliver the same amount of oxygen. This strains the heart to contract faster and more intensely than normal.”

If you already have a heart condition, the condition can worsen if you develop anemia. Other factors, such as demographics, can determine the risk of anemia linking to heart conditions. “For example, 20 year olds with severe anemia rarely have dangerous complications, whereas older adults are at a much higher risk even if they are just mildly anemic,” says Dr. Kasamon.

Getting Treatment
Anemia is a reversible disorder. To optimize heart health, seek treatment for anemia to correct the red-blood-cell level back to normal, which will take strain off and positively affect your heart. Treatment varies depending on the cause of anemia and can include iron supplements, changes in diet, vitamins, prescription medication, blood transfusions or bone marrow transplant.

Dr. Kasamon also encourages those with anemia symptoms to be screened by a physician. “Patients often assume their anemia is caused by iron deficiency and self-medicate with iron. In some cases, this can cause iron overload and ironically lead to a variety of complications, including heart failure.”

Karl Kasamon, M.D., is a hematologist with Chesapeake Oncology-Hematology Associates in Columbia.

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I love carbs! Technically, our bodies and brain NEED carbs. But the carbohydrates I’m referring to are the “bad” ones. The ones I grew up with: white rice, white potatoes, taro, and all kinds of breads. Frankly, I have a potato problem. I love potatoes in all their glorious forms! However, I am partial to a giant mountain of home made mashed potatoes. So, in order to keep an eye on my blood sugars, I trick myself with one of my favorite low-carb sides: garlic cauliflower mash. It’s a surprisingly delicious way to enjoy cauliflower while simultaneously satisfying those carb cravings for mashed potatoes.

cauliflower mashIngredients: cauliflower, minced garlic, salt, pepper, olive oil, butter, milk (optional: paprika, spinach, white beans, pesto)

Chop a head of cauliflower into florets. You can either blanch the florets in boiling water for 15 minutes, or stem the florets in the microwave or on the stove. You just need to get the cauliflower tender for “mashing.” While florets are cooking, get a small fry pan going with medium heat- then, drizzle a bit of olive oil, add a minced garlic clove. (At this point, you could add add a handful of spinach to lightly wilt in the pan or white beans or pesto or additional seasonings.) Whatever healthy, brave concoction you’ve created in your garlic pan, add to a food processor. Then, drain the water from your blanched cauliflower and add florets to the food processor as well. Blend in food processor with a little bit of salt/pepper, up to 1 Tbsp of butter, and splash of milk until its nearly smooth. Scrape down the sides occasionally. Keep an eye on its consistency so you don’t put it over the edge as a puree. You can also do this step manually with a fork or masher. Either way, it’ll be tasty. Dress up your mash with chives or other fresh herbs.

Another delicious and simple way to get more cauliflower into your diet: cauliflower rice!

My sister-in-love (as opposed to sister-in-law) bought some cauliflower rice from the store the other night. It was basically a head of cauliflower that was pulsed in a food processor and repackaged in a foam tray with a price tag and plastic wrap. Save yourself the extra cost and just get a head of cauliflower. Once your raw cauliflower is pulsed to the point of rice (or cous cous) texture, you should set a fry pan on medium heat with a drizzle of olive oil. You can then add a clove of garlic minced, along with a small white/yellow onion minced, maybe a handful of baby portobellas chopped. Saute until mushrooms are soft and onions are nearly translucent. At that point, add the cauliflower. This is a great base for any and all flavors you’re interested in creating. Simply season with salt and pepper or anything your heart desires! What’s great about cauliflower is that (like rice) it will absorb the seasoning beautifully. I’ve seen Indian cauliflower rice with cumin, turmeric, ginger, etc. The pellets of cauliflower will also absorb the colors of your herbs and spices! Try something fun like a Spanish style cauliflower rice or something Guam-style like achote red-rice (annatto seeds).  

Cauliflower is pretty easy to work with, you just need to put in time. There’s all kinds of great recipes for cauliflower tots (like potato tots), cauliflower soup, cous cous like salad, cauliflower popcorn (deep fried cauliflower), “steaks”, tortillas- the only limit is your imagination! Try out our Paleo cookbooks for more ideas!

 


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congestive heart failure (CHF)

[Credit: Nastco]/[iStock]/Thinkstock] Common CHF may be due to a weak heart muscle, leaking or narrowed valves, untreated high blood pressure, cardiac arrhythmias and, less often, diseases of the sac around the heart. Our Dr. George Groman offers advice for managing CHF.

The human body is a sponge, and for those with congestive heart failure (CHF), keeping their heart from being overwhelmed by too much fluid accumulating in their body can be an ongoing challenge.

According to George Groman, M.D., a cardiologist on staff at Howard County General Hospital, common causes of CHF can include a weak heart muscle damaged by a heart attack; leaking or narrowed valves; untreated high blood pressure; some cardiac arrhythmias; and, less often, diseases of the sac around the heart. These conditions can make the heart too weak to pump blood adequately. Another cause of CHF is diastolic dysfunction—when the heart is stiff and can’t sufficiently relax to fill with blood. This dysfunction becomes increasingly common with age and uncontrolled blood pressure as well as other causes.

Preventing Fluid Complications
If you have CHF, to reduce fluid buildup, Dr. Groman recommends you should:

  • Limit salt intake. Use pepper or herbs and spices instead. Check with your doctor before using a salt substitute, which could cause a dangerous elevation of potassium.
  • Be evaluated for sleep apnea if you snore.
  • Use alcohol prudently—it can weaken the heart in some cases.
  • Not use illicit drugs.
  • Not smoke.
  • Eat heart healthy—minimize saturated fat, trans fat and sugar.
  • Maintain a healthy weight, and monitor your weight daily. If you see a progressive increase of three or more pounds in a week, call your cardiologist, who may adjust your diuretic dose.
  • Exercise.
  • Take medications prescribed by your cardiologist.

Treating Fluid Buildup: New Hospital Service
“There can come a time when your small intestine becomes so waterlogged that your medications cannot be adequately absorbed,” says Dr. Groman. “This can result in further fluid buildup and may put you at risk for needing hospitalization and other types of intensive care.” To help patients avoid having to stay in the hospital, HCGH has begun an outpatient IV diuresis service to which your cardiologist can refer you. Appointments are offered weekdays in the hospital’s Infusion Center and last several hours to allow your nurse to record urinary output in response to the diuretic.

During treatment, nurses will speak with you about your diet and medications. All patients will receive a referral for a home care evaluation and remote, nursing-based patient monitoring. Lab work will be done (primarily to evaluate kidney function) and reviewed prior to you returning home.

“This collaborative effort between the patient’s physician, clinic nurses and home health has the potential to keep patients out of the hospital—and that is a very good thing,” notes Dr. Groman.

George Groman, M.D., is a cardiologist with Cardiovascular Specialists of Central Maryland in Columbia.

 


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8 Ways to Avoid Sitting Disease

sitting disease

[© Nruboc | Dreamstime.com] One way to avoid sitting all day at a desk job is to take your calls while standing up.

You Can Start By Reading This Blog Standing Up

Sitting for many hours a day is a common practice. Without realizing it, many people are falling victim to sitting disease. The American College of Cardiology defines sitting disease as being sedentary for many hours with little movement and calls it a lifestyle risk factor for cardiovascular disease, blood clots, heart attack, stroke, diabetes and a variety of other conditions.

Even those who incorporate exercise into their routine can have sitting disease. “Going to the gym three days a week to get your heart rate up is not sufficient. You actually need to incorporate movement throughout your daily routine as well,” says Kabir Yousuf, M.D., a cardiologist on staff at Howard County General Hospital. “Often people try to plan out their physical activity too much and get wrapped up with a trainer or a gym class exercise regimen instead of getting out and just moving. My philosophy is to just get up and move—the more the better. This is especially important if you have a sedentary job. Moving doesn’t have to be scheduled—every step and minute you spend doing physical activity counts and can reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease.”

Desk Jockeys: 8 Ways to Stay Fit

  • Take the stairs
  • For every hour you sit, move for five minutes. If you can’t do this every hour, do it every two hours and increase your movement to 10 minutes.
  • Instead of sitting while on the phone, stand.
  • Park further away in the parking lot to take advantage of walking.
  • Have walking meetings instead of sitting in meetings throughout the day. If you even take a quarter of your meetings outside of the conference room and walk somewhere, it is beneficial.
  • When you are at a store—instead of shopping right away—take a lap or two around the store before buying anything.
  • Get a partner or a friend to motivate you—you will be more apt to be active when you have a partner.
  • Incorporate technology—using activity trackers, websites and apps, you can track your activity and be reminded to move throughout the day.
Kabir Yousuf, M.D., is a cardiologist with Maryland Cardiovascular Specialists. To schedule an appointment, call 410-740-0549

 


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Hdrivenbyemotionsave you ever experienced an emotion that you could not explain or describe? If you have, you can attest to this unexplained emotion leading to even more indescribable emotions. Before you know it, you are left feeling like you don’t understand yourself.

I have had experiences where loved ones have told me to “be happier” or “calm down” after I try to explain what I’m feeling. These dismissive responses have caused me to repress my emotions at times; as if they didn’t exist. You can’t just “be happy” because someone told you that you should be. In fact, you shouldn’t tell someone how and when to feel a certain way. Instead, be respectful of their feelings and find ways to help them.

Many people living with depression and/or anxiety can’t always put their feelings into words. Much less, explain why it’s happening, just that it is. The society we live in is very good at prescribing solutions to fix, assist, or aid in one’s physical health. If we tell a friend we’ve broken our arm, the solution is a cast. If we have any kind of  physical illness or disease we have everything from physical therapy to surgery to address these ailments. Unfortunately, when it comes to emotional health (and intelligence) our friends and family aren’t always able to come up with tangible solutions. In fact, mental wellness is often seen as a more abstract concept and, sadly, isn’t always taken seriously.

Working to recognize your emotions (and the emotions of others) and the ability to distinguish between different feelings is key. Once you’re able to identify your emotions and the feelings that come with them, you can use that information to guide your thinking and behavior. Having a plan and taking action to healthfully address your state of mind is an essential step in managing your wellness. A few examples include: examining your diet and exercise regimen, trying meditation, exploring a new hobby, exploring the outdoors, making time for yourself, talking with a close friend or therapist, and coloring. These are just a few ways you can find positive behaviors that can make you both happier and healthier.

Each person experiences life, and the world around them, in a different way. So, the answers to their emotional needs will be just as diverse. Let’s find more ways to be more understanding and practice compassion when the people around us are comfortable sharing their feelings. Besides, we’re on this planet to help each other.

Laci Radford is a Children’s Instructor & Research Specialist at Miller Branch. She is a music lover, writer, and an avid reader. She enjoys attending concerts, plays, and other forms of live entertainment. Her favorite activities include scoping out unique items at thrift stores, bonfires with friends, and having tie-dye parties. She is studying Psychology and plans to become a music and art therapist sooner rather than later.


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