One morning, I completely fell apart. I told my husband I wanted to die and he rushed me to the emergency room. I was prescribed an antidepressant and things immediately started improving.

I was suffering from major postpartum depression, which in my experience was like living in a completely different world from everyone I loved. I could see them laughing and smiling, but I couldn’t participate despite how hard I tried. I felt cut off, cut out, and on the verge of being discarded. I was completely convinced that I would keel over at any moment.

Still, I was very much a part of my son’s life. I played with him, breastfed, cleaned house, walked my dog, exercised, ate healthy, and generally attempted to enjoy life.

My moods oscillated between nervous trepidation and complete despair. My friends noticed that I was very sensitive and didn’t laugh the way I used to, but just assumed it came with the territory of new motherhood. My family noticed that I had lost my confidence, but couldn’t decipher any real problem.

It started almost immediately after giving birth. I was wholly unprepared to be a mom; totally unprepared for the overwhelming feeling of love and joy my son would bring me. Unfortunately, he suffered from colic, which despite everything I tried continued until he was four months old. Then, at four months, he stopped sleeping. My husband and I would manage two hours of sporadic sleep throughout the day. It was sheer torture. After a month of this I had lost myself. My husband said I would wander around the house mumbling under my breath.

We finally decided to hire a pediatric sleep specialist. She was a godsend. At six months, he would take two solid naps and sleep 10-12 hours a night. I finally had the opportunity to sleep. We thought things would improve for me too.

I slept better, certainly, but not well. My son still cried occasionally, like any normal baby, but to me it was agonizing. His occasional fits would cause me to breakdown. I would sob and shake until he stopped crying. We went on like this for two more months.

After eight months of this I’d become a different person. My son was healthy, happy, and sleeping well, but I couldn’t see it. I had somehow convinced myself that he wasn’t doing well, and that it was my fault. I had convinced myself that he had suffered from colic and sleep issues because of me, and that if he’d had a better mother he would have been happy and healthy from the very beginning.

And so, that one morning (described above), my husband took me to the ER and I got help.

Things have continued to improve. I’ve read hopeful and helpful stories on coming back from postpartum depression. My therapist cleared me a few months ago, and I see a psychiatrist every two months. I admit I was afraid taking antidepressants would make things worse, but it has truly helped. I never expected treatment to be this rewarding. Life is completely wonderful and I have the tools and support to enjoy it with my family. Getting help was the best thing I could have done.

My hope in writing this is that it encourages you, or someone you know, to get the help they need. No one should have to be afraid of treatment. Always consult your family physician when seeking any kind of medical care. The most important thing to remember with postpartum depression is that your well being is essential to the health of your child. Your baby needs you, everything else is secondary.

Howard County Library System has loads of books on parenting and mental health. I personally loved Pamela Druckerman’s Bringing up Bebe : One American Mother Discovers the Wisdom of French Parenting.

Brenna Godsey is a Customer Service Specialist at Central Branch. She lives in Columbia and is a proud mother of one boy and a golden-doodle. She enjoys reading, napping, and playing with her growing family.

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As winter slides into spring, I start to crave fresh fruits and vegetables. However, some members of the household can be more reluctant when it comes to this bounty.

Beautiful glossy photographs and simple rhyming text feature fresh, seasonal fruits and vegetables. Walking through the farmer’s market April Pulley Sayre in Go, Go, Grapes celebrates the familiar cherries and the unfamiliar rambutan. Even the pickiest of eaters will “Reach for peach. Fuzz is fine.” Rah, Rah, Radishes is an exuberant paean to the greens. Broccoli, bok choy, cucumbers, and fennel never looked so good!

Both of these books contain back matter for parents on the importance of whole fruits and vegetables in the diet and how to make them more appealing to a child. Sayre notes that “No vegetables were harmed or mistreated in the making of this book. Most, however, were later eaten.”

Take your child to the grocery store. Let them see the beauty of the produce department and encourage them to try ‘just a little bit’ of something new. Try different strategies with your reluctant eater. Just like reluctant readers they sometimes just need the right book (or fruit).

In Ciara Gavin’s third Bear book, she tackles the problem of the favorite food. Bear is a member of a duck family (read Room for Bear for a great story about blended families). When Bear discovers jam, he forgets to how to share, and won’t eat anything but jam. Mama is worried about Bear, and warns “no more jam until Bear eats vegetables.” There is the classic struggle. Refuses breakfast, refuses dinner. Bear’s siblings come to the rescue with classic food games (stick the peas to your nose and lick them off and corn as buried gold under the mashed potatoes). “Now Bear eats vegetables every night.”

Siblings can be great allies in the food wars. Just the idea that my brothers would eat it if I wouldn’t was enough to clear the plate.

Appreciation. Gratitude. “As we sit round this table, let’s give thanks as we are able, to all the folks we’ll never meet, who helped provide this food we eat.”

Another simple, perfect read aloud book about all that is has to happen before the meal that is in front of us can be enjoyed. Before We Eat: from Farm to Table, uses colorful woodcut prints to show the farmers, beekeepers, packagers, drivers, and finally grocery store workers who made this feast happen. Small children can still assist in small ways to prepare a meal. Being part of the process changes the child from a consumer to a creator. That creator may be much more willing to consume the fruits of his labor.

Try it, you’ll like it! And we have a book, DVD, e-resource that might help. See you at the library.

Shirley ONeill works for Howard County Library System as the Children’s and Teen Materials Specialist. She cannot believe she actually gets paid to do this job.

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Jeniah Simpson wearing a red hat from the American Heart Association's Little Hats, Big Hearts for heat disease awareness.

Jeniah Simpson wearing a red hat from the American Heart Association’s Little Hats, Big Hearts. Supporters knit and crochet red hats to give to thousands of babies at participating hospitals during American Heart Month.

Congenital heart defects are the most common type of birth defect. But despite great advances in screening and diagnosis, congenital heart disease can go unnoticed for a long period of time until heart damage has progressed enough to cause detectable symptoms.

While we celebrate Valentine’s Day this week, it also marks Congenital Heart Disease Awareness Week. The pediatric cardiologists at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center and elsewhere remind both parents and their pediatricians to watch for any subtle signs that could signal the presence of congenital heart disease.

What Is a Congenital Heart Defect?

When the heart or blood vessels around it do not develop properly or develop abnormally before birth, a condition called congenital heart defect occurs (congenital means “existing at birth”). Congenital heart defects occur in close to one percent of all babies born, affecting some 40 thousand infants annually in the U.S. That’s about eight babies for every one thousand children born in the U.S. Most young people with congenital heart defects live into adulthood now, but may require more than one intervention or surgery to treat their condition.

Types of Congenital Heart Defects

  • A hole between two chambers of the heart (common defect)
  •  The right or left side of the heart is not formed completely (hypoplastic)
  • Only one ventricle is present
  • Both the pulmonary artery and the aorta arise from the same ventricle
  • The pulmonary artery and the aorta arise from the “wrong” ventricles

Signs and Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Disease

In infants, the classic signs include the following:

  • Fatigue
  • Sweating around the baby’s head during feeding
  • Slow growth
  • Breathing fast while at rest and/or asleep
  • Irritability
  • Bluish or pale skin, a sign of abnormally low oxygen levels

In older children, typical signs of congenital heart defects include:

  • Complaints of heart palpitations
  • Feelings of dizziness
  • Getting tired very easily with physical exertion
  • Inability to keep up with other kids

Cause of Congenital Heart Defects

In most cases, the cause is unknown. Sometimes a viral infection in the mother causes the condition. The condition can be genetic (hereditary). Most heart defects either cause an abnormal blood flow through the heart, or obstruct blood flow in the heart or vessels.

Treatment for Congenital Heart Problems

As children grow, some minor heart defects such as small holes may repair themselves. But when a defect requires correction, there are both non-surgical and surgical treatments available today which are less invasive and involve cardiac catheterization, medical device insertion, and minimally invasive heart surgery. In rare cases, a heart transplant may be needed.

Learn more about congenital heart defects from Johns Hopkins Medicine’s Pediatric Cardiology.


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Promoting Girl Power Is Healthy

Do we need Girl Power today when girls have caught up and often outperform boys in school STEM-related subjects? When they are earning more college diplomas than boys, and are increasingly represented in STEM-related careers? So then, why Girl Power?

At the Central Branch of Howard County Library System, girls have an outlet for building self-confidence, developing friendships, and doing STEAM-related activities. If you ask these tween customers why they feel Girl Power is important, this is what you’ll hear:

“So we can encourage girls to do anything in the world.”- Anne (Age 10)
“Friendship!”- Marianne (Age 11)
“I believe that every single girl has power inside of them.”- Alexis (Age 9)
“It teaches girls to be brave & strong.”- Abby (11)
“It helps bring my inner voice come out.”- Trisha (Age 11)
“Because we want to fight back from being bullied.”- Brooke (age 9)

Research shows that as girls approach puberty and their bodies start to change, their self-esteem may decrease. An astounding number of tween and teen girls are unhappy with their bodies, and research shows that girls being worried about the way they look can influence their participation in activities. Thanks to national, state, and community initiatives in recent years, girls’ participation and success in STEM-related subjects has significantly improved. However, girls with lower self-esteem who believe in gender stereotypes such as “boys are better at math” suffer academically and consequently are less likely to pursue STEM-related careers.

There is good news! Positive female role models help combat negative female stereotypes. Likewise, getting hands-on experience in STEM-related subjects and activities can help give girls the confidence to pursue more STEM-related activities and/or careers. Another way to hone into that inner Girl Power is to check out the list of girl-empowering reads at the end of this post!

It’s also important to remember that not every girl will aspire to be a scientist or a mathematician, and that is perfectly okay! Girl Power is all about girls having the confidence to reach their individual potential and feel an inner happiness. Allison, an HCLS Girl Power attendee, sums up best why girls still need opportunities to explore and embrace their inner power: “To empower girls not to be afraid to do anything we put our minds to.” Check out hclibrary.org to register for the next Girl Power class.

TWEEN FICTION

100-dressestuesdayharriet-the-spy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

elevenprincess-academypenderwicksmocking-bird

TWEEN NONFICTION

brown-girl-dreaming smart-girl-money

women-in-science

 

 

 

 

 

 

TEEN GIRL FICTION

star-girl graceling gayle-foreman fan-girl

 

 

 

 

 

 

TEEN GIRL NONFICTION

girls-in-computers gutsy-girl rad-women-worldwide red-star-girl

 

 

 

 

 

Jillianne Crescenzi is a part-time Children’s Instructor & Research Specialist at Central Branch. She loves empowering young women and sharing great books with all.

 

 


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The Kids’ Guide to Staying Awesome and In Control

kids-guide-staying-awesome-controlA wonderful resource for children, caregivers, teachers, and practitioners, The Kids’ Guide to Staying Awesome and In Control: Simple Stuff to Help Children Regulate their Emotions and Senses is remarkable and even life-changing. Author Lauren Brukner knows how to keep things real and simple and sincere and children and emotions are two topics that go together and need to be talked about more, especially in the frank and charming way that Brukner does. Though it is specifically designed for children (and it is children who need it the most), I think there is something here for adults too. There’s something we ALL can learn from as we daily navigate the sometimes rocky road of emotions.

When Lauren Brukner was a child she had difficulty paying attention in class. She couldn’t express what was bothering her, and calming down after she she got sad, mad, or frustrated was nearly impossible. She would often struggle with feeling she had little control over her life. These experiences inspired her desire to help children identify not only “what” or “how” they were feeling, but ways for them to control or change (or at least improve) those feelings. She introduces us to “anywhere body breaks.” These are small body exercises to bring calm and focus.

“Anywhere body breaks” is based on proprioceptive input which is letting your body know where you are in space and which, in turn, can help stabilize you emotionally and keep you more centered and focused. To first understand what is going on, it is important to label that feeling as physical (in your body) or emotional (in your mind or heart) . Then, within those two categories, whether those feelings are: slow and tired, fast and emotional, or fast and wiggly. Brukner uses simple language and pleasing, welcoming visuals in a manner that never talks down to the reader. Truly, this could only have been written by someone who has been there herself.

Robin F. of Savage Branch & STEM Education Center

Robin F. models the “arm pretzel.”

One of the simplest “body breaks” (that has worked, even for me) is called the “arm-pretzel.” In doing this exercise a child should cross her arms with her palm touching as she interlaces her fingers. Then she should twist her arms, bringing them in close to the chest. This is designed for when children feel slow and tired or fast and wiggly.

Full of insightful and easy-to-grasp examples so that children can learn to self-regulate their emotions and senses, Brukner’s guide helps them face difficult feelings head on and feel calm, cool and collected. The Kids’ Guide to Staying Awesome and In Control gives children self-control, direction, and ownership of their emotions and ways to feel and function better anywhere and at any time.

It also helps children understand and truly recognize what they are feeling, whether those feelings are slow and tired, fast and emotional or fast and wiggly, and empowers them with coping techniques they can use to feel just right. In a world where even the most basic of emotions can be trying on both adults and children, a book like this is invaluable and not soon to be forgotten.

sitting-still-like-a-frog

Sitting Still Like a Frog

Another terrific book for children and their parents is Sitting Still Like a Frog: Mindful Exercises for Kids (and Their Parents). This book takes on feelings by developing attention and awareness of our surroundings and ourselves, in what is better known as mindfulness. Author Eline Snel also advocates for what she calls “heartfulness,” which includes being kind toward oneself and others. In one instance, she has readers imagine channeling a frog because it is capable of enormous leaps yet it can also remain very still and not react right away, even though it is aware of everything going on around it. The frog sits still and breathes, preserving its energy instead of getting carried away by all the ideas that keep popping into its head. By painting this very vivid picture, Eline Snel gives the reader a model on which to try and best attain their emotional state. With 189 reviews (70% of which are 5 star) on Amazon, Sitting Still Like A Frog is extremely well-received and the perfect companion for The Kids’ Guide to Staying Awesome and In Control.

Additional resources regarding children and the self regulation of their emotions:

i-have-feelings

superheroselfcontrol parenting-a-child-who-has-intense-emotions

 

Self Regulation, Promoting Self Regulation, Learning Self Regulation

Angie Engles has been with the Howard County Library System for 22 years, 14 of which were at the Savage Branch. She works at the Central Branch primarily in the Fiction and Audio-visual departments. Her interests include music, books, old movies, and cats.

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Flu Shot Tips for Comforting Children

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the flu is more dangerous than the common cold for children. Children younger than 5 years old typically need medical care, and severe cases are more common in children younger than 2 years old. Children with chronic health problems like asthma, diabetes and brain and nervous system disorders are especially at high risk of developing serious complications from the flu.

The CDC recommends flu vaccinations for children as being the single best way to protect them from the flu. Common vaccination methods have included the nasal mist and shot. However, recent research has found the nasal mist to be ineffective, and because of this the CDC is only recommending the shot as an effective vaccination method.

Convincing children to get the shot is likely to be a hurdle for parents, but parents can make the experience less stressful with these tips from Laura Hagan, Howard County General Hospital Pediatric Emergency Room nurse manager, and her little helpers.

Parents may also find it helpful to try these following tips:

  • Taking slow, deep breaths – Deep breathing can help children relax and concentrate on something other than the shot. For this reason, parents should ask their children to breathe all the way down to their belly.
  • Focusing on something in the room – Parents can distract their children by getting them to concentrate on the details of a poster, picture or sign in the room. For example, if there’s a picture, they can count the number of flowers, animals or other images in the picture. In the case of a sign, they can try to think of new words from the same letters that are in the sign.
  • Coughing – Encouraging children to cough as the needle goes in may help them feel less pain during the process.
  • Relaxing the arm – A tense arm can make a shot hurt more, so parents should try to get their children to relax their arm.

For more information, view Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital’s Five Tips for Surviving Shots.


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