Type 1 vs Type 2 Diabetes

Type 1 vs. Type 2 Diabetes [Credit: Teabrew] / [Dreamstime]

Diabetes is known as a “silent disease” because many of the signs and symptoms are not noticeable, yet approximately 1.4 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes every year.

If you’re like many who think nothing can be done to change your diagnosis, think again. According to Mark Corriere, M.D., an endocrinologist on staff at HCGH, you are in charge and, through lifestyle changes and education, you can be in control of your diabetes.

Get educated.
Diabetes is a disease where self-management and self-awareness are key. Dr. Corriere tell his patients that “you will have this for the rest of your life, so the more you know about it, the better you can manage it.” Take classes and arm yourself with knowledge. Mike Taylor, RN, MHA, CDE, HCGH diabetes clinical program manager, recommends finding a source you trust and ask questions.

Understand the toll of pounds.
Patients underestimate the impact weight loss can have on diabetes. Just losing 10 percent of your body weight can have a dramatic effect, according to Dr. Corriere. Through diet and exercise, you can gain control of your diabetes.

  • Food – When it comes to food, people need to consider portion size. “Everyone wants to talk about cutting carbs, but in reality, the kind of food we eat is not completely to blame; it is also the portion sizes. Just because something is labeled as healthy does not mean it’s true. Products and branding labels can be misleading; instead, read the ingredient label or eat natural foods. For example, using fat-free ranch salad dressing is like putting fat-free ranch-flavored pancake syrup on your salad,” said Taylor.
  • Exercise – Taylor also cites exercise as being the most important thing you can do, outside of your diet, and is more important than any medication. He recommends moving a minimum of 30 minutes each day, four days a week. “You don’t have to start there, but you should get there,” said Taylor. Learn more about the effects of exercise on diabetes.

Have a positive attitude.
You may have a lot going on in your life, but diabetes does not have to stop you from living your life. You can do this. There is help available to guide you through the process.

Embrace change.
Treating diabetes is more than a diet. You have to maintain a level of dedication. It is a behavior change for life.

Begin now.
How you care for yourself during the first few years following your diagnosis can have a real impact. Taylor recommends being involved in defining your goal with your physician and discussing how you are going to achieve it. According to Dr. Corriere, controlling your diabetes from the beginning can make a difference—especially in reducing long-term complications over your lifetime.

Do you have other helpful tips and resources for our readers? Share them. They’ll be glad you did.

Mark Corriere, M.D. is an endocrinologist on staff at HCGH and at Maryland Endocrine. To schedule an appointment, call 301-953-2080.
Mike Taylor, RN, MHA, CDE, is HCGH diabetes clinical program manager. To schedule an appointment, call 410-740-7601.

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Woman Consoling Man [Credit: Monkeybusinessimages] / [Dreamstime]

April is Defeat Diabetes month and we thought we’d write about a subject that isn’t often written about, how friends and family can provide emotional support to loved ones who have diabetes.

A diabetes diagnosis can be overwhelming emotionally for loved ones as well as the person with the disease. Friends and family don’t always know the best way to help. Licensed psychologist Lisa Hoffmeyer, Ph.D., a diabetic herself, gives friends and family the following advice:

Offer to Help
Ask what kind of help the diabetic needs and wants, and take a collective approach, “What can we do together to make sure you are healthy in the future?” Newly diagnosed diabetics wrestle with the notion that their life will be terribly different moving forward. They often feel their body has failed them. They might be angry. They need support as they make the necessary lifestyle adjustments to manage the disease.

In addition, the patient should also ask their family, “What are you scared of? How can I help you understand my disease? How can you feel safe and know that I am going to be OK?”

Be Informed
If someone with diabetes is open to it, attend doctor visits and educational classes together, but respect their independence. If your loved one has hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), you should know what signs indicate a possible emergency and what to do if your loved one loses consciousness. Family and friends should learn everything the patient does, with one caveat, they should not be the experts—the patient should.

Plan for the Future
Seniors with diabetes may face many challenges and they are twice as likely to get dementia versus non-diabetics. It is important that caregivers be prepared should the diabetic not be capable of managing their care. Have conversations about managing diabetes before it becomes an issue.

Don’t Police
It is important for friends and family to realize the patient needs to own their disease and, unless impaired, they must be in charge of managing it. A lot of family members become the ‘diabetes police,’ and that’s not helpful. Instead of asking, “Are you sure you should be eating that?” a better way to help a loved one with diabetes is to ask, “What can I do to support you and help you succeed?”

Understand Insulin
Many patients with type 2 diabetes will become insulin-dependent or choose to go on insulin pumps. It isn’t a sign that they are doing anything wrong. Insulin may be the best treatment for some people and not necessarily a sign of worsening health. My recommendation is that the diabetic does what it takes to be healthy in the moment.

For more information about diabetes, view:

Do you have other support tips? Share them with us and our readers.


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You Can Still Be a Foodie with High Blood Pressure

woman eating a high blood pressure friendly meal

Woman Eating a High Blood Pressure Friendly Meal

Everyone loves a delicious dish, including yourself, right? Though when you suffer from high blood pressure (hypertension) you’re likely to think you’ve got two choices when it comes to eating: eating incredibly tasteless bland food for the rest of your life or continue eating the way you typically do and see where it takes you, after all, there’s medication.

The problem with the latter is it can contribute to taking more medication or worse yet, lead to heart disease and stroke.

But, there’s good news, you can take care of your blood pressure and be a foodie at the same time, you just have to be a smart foodie. Start being a smart foodie with these six simple tips.

  1. Understand how to read food labels
    The nutrition facts label is a key tool when making healthier food choices. The most important number on food labels … serving sizes. According to Johns Hopkins Exercise Physiologist, Kerry J. Stewart, Ed.D., “a lot of people don’t pay attention to serving size when they read nutrition labels, so they wind up getting double, triple or even quadruple the amount of calories, carbs, fats and so on.” Once you know the serving size, you can better measure calories and choose your nutrients wisely – taking in more fiber, potassium and vitamins A and C and reducing cholesterol, sodium, sugars, saturated fats and trans fats, which can also be found in hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated oils.
  2. Stay hydrated
    It is important for the body to have adequate fluids, especially water. Water helps prevent dehydration, flushes out excess sodium, assists with weight loss, and helps with the digestion and absorption of key nutrients. Your water intake doesn’t always have to be straight out of the tap, try spring water or add a twist of lemon or lime for some added flavor. Unless you’re advised otherwise by your physician, you can still have your favorite beverages, though you’ll want to limit your intake of them because of their added sugars or salt. Make these an indulgence rather than an everyday occurrence.
  3. Reduce your sodium intake
    Too much salt or sodium can cause your body to retain fluid, which can increase blood pressure. To reduce your sodium intake eat fresh produce, use herbs and spices for flavor and choose low- sodium or no-added-salt “convenience” foods.
  4. Include a variety of colorful vegetables
    Vegetables add important heart-healthy nutrients and fiber that help you feel satisfied and full. If you’re a vegetable lover, try eating more vegetarian meals. Vegetarian diets tend to be higher in potassium, magnesium and calcium. You can find loads of vegetarian recipes online. Experiment, try new dishes and see what you like.
  5. Eat fresh, in-season fruit
    It’s healthier, more refreshing, and best of all, requires very little prep work from you. Though, if you like creating in the kitchen, try various fruit salad combinations and add it to other foods for extra pizazz. Either way, fruit is a good multi-purpose food; you can start or end your day with it or snack on it in the middle of the day and on the go. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, the following fruits are available during the following seasons:fruit by season
  6. Choose nuts and seeds for fun snacks
    Nuts and seeds make for great snack foods. They’re rich in sources of energy, magnesium, protein and fiber. But, if you’re going to snack on these, remember to choose salt-free. The National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute recommends eating almonds, hazelnuts, mixed nuts, peanuts and sunflower seeds.

With these six tips, you now have a starting point for eating delicious dishes with a healthy twist.

For more help on managing high blood pressure, enroll in our Living Health with Hypertension class.

What are your favorite high blood pressure friendly foods? Share with us and our readers.


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Colonoscopy, It’s Better Than You Think

Colon Cancer Screening Ten Second Assessment

Colon Cancer Screening Ten Second Assessment

Between hearing the dreaded prep stories and the thought of having a device inserted into your bottom, it’s no wonder you’re probably questioning … is colonoscopy screening really necessary?

Yes, it is! According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States and the third most common cancer in men and women. Yet, it’s one of the most curable types of gastrointestinal cancer, if detected early.

It all starts with a small polyp that grows in the colon’s lining. If untreated, the polyp grows larger and larger, to the point of becoming cancerous. When it’s at that point, the cancer starts to spread.

Now knowing why it’s necessary, let’s get to the truth behind the myths.

The prep drink tastes awful and you have to drink a lot of it.
While it might not taste like your favorite beverage, the good news is bowel prep has become easier. Products have greatly improved, as recently as within the last few years, and many physicians are prescribing a split dose – half the night before and half the morning of the procedure.

Expect to live in the bathroom.
To say you will live in the bathroom during your prep is an exaggeration, but you will visit it often, so it’s best that you spend your time in a comfortable setting with a bathroom close by.

No food the day before your procedure.
Not exactly, though you can expect to be on a limited diet. Physicians will typically instruct you to only eat a light breakfast and lunch before noon. After noon, you can expect to be on a clear liquids diet, but don’t worry, it’s not just water. You can drink your favorite juices, tea, coffee (without cream), soda and indulge your sweet tooth with jello, popsicles and Italian ices, so long as they don’t include pieces of fruit.

The goal is to have a clean colon so the physician can easily detect any polyps.

Having a device inserted in your bottom must hurt.
The device is a colonoscope. It’s a flexible camera that can easily move through the colon, allowing the physician to examine your colon and detect and remove any polyps.

While this may sound uncomfortable, you’ll be given a sedative before the procedure, so that you’re in a comfortable, drowsy, twilight sleep while this is happening. You probably won’t even remember the procedure when you wake up or feel any discomfort – most don’t.

No symptoms, no family history means no need for screening.
Colon cancer typically starts as precancerous growths. Precancerous growths don’t usually display symptoms, so feeling fine doesn’t exempt you from getting screened. And, if you think you can escape colon cancer because it doesn’t run in your family, think again. Everyone is at risk.

Screening should start at age 50 and younger if you do have a family history of colon cancer or if you are African-American or Eastern European Jewish decent.

Don’t let myths or fears stop you from getting screened. If you have additional question and concerns, speak with your physician. But if you’re ready to get screened, make an appointment with our physicians.


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Simple Steps to Avoid Heart Disease

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in men and women in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease and Prevention (CDC). Unfortunately, you may not realize that you are at risk of having a heart attack until it’s too late.

While there is very little you can do to change your family medical history, you can make lifestyle changes to lower your risk. First, learn about the behaviors that increase the risk of heart disease, and then start taking preventive steps.

Behaviors that Increase Heart Disease Risk

Preventive Steps

Eat a heart-healthy diet

Add these following foods to your diet. They are considered to be the main ingredients of a heart-healthy diet.

  • Vegetables – greens (spinach, collard greens and kale), broccoli, cabbage and carrots
  • Fruits – apples, bananas, oranges, pears, grapes and prunes
  • Whole grains – plain oatmeal, brown rice and whole-grain bread or tortillas
  • Fat-free or low-fat dairy foods – milk, cheese or yogurt
  • Protein-rich foods – fish high in omega-3 fatty acids, lean meats, poultry, eggs, nuts, seeds, soy products and legumes (lentils and some bean types)
  • Oils, butters, nuts and seeds – canola, corn, olive, safflower, sesame, sunflower and soybean oils; nut and seed butters; walnuts, almonds and pine nuts; and sesame, sunflower, pumpkin and flax seeds

Aim for a healthy weight 

Body mass index (BMI), a measure of weight relative to height, is commonly used for determining weight category (underweight, healthy weight, overweight and obese). Adults are typically considered to be at a healthy weight when their BMI ranges from 18.5 to 24.9.

Use Johns Hopkins Medicine’s BMI calculator to help determine your BMI.

Lower stress

Improve your emotional and physical health by learning to manage stress and practice stress-reducing activities, including:

  • Seeing a mental health care provider
  • Joining a stress management program
  • Meditating
  • Being physically active
  • Practicing relaxation therapy
  • Speaking with friends, family and community or religious support systems

Increase physical activity

Routine physical activity can lower bad (LDL) cholesterol and increase good (HDL) cholesterol levels, control high blood pressure and help with losing excess weight.

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute recommends the following:

  • Moderate-intensity aerobic exercise – at least 2 hours and 30 minutes per week
  • Vigorous aerobic exercise – 1 hour and 15 minutes per week

Before starting a new exercise program, you should first ask your doctor how much and what physical activities are safe for you.

Quit smoking

Speak with your doctor about programs and products that can help you quit smoking, and try to avoid secondhand smoke. If you are having trouble with quitting on your own, consider joining a support group.

Visit your doctor

According to David Jackson, M.D., a cardiologist on staff at HCGH, one of the critical steps to keeping your heart healthy is seeing your doctor for a routine physical exam. Your doctor checks your blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar – the big three indicators for heart attack and stroke.

“If your numbers start to become abnormal, you may not feel different or experience symptoms, so it’s important to have them checked periodically and more frequently as you age,” says Dr. Jackson. “Having a primary care physician monitoring your care to identify trends in your numbers is important.”

Learn more about why primary care physicians are important to your health.

More Information

For more details on heart-healthy living, view the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute’s Heart-healthy Lifestyle Changes.

Share Your Thoughts

Do you have any heart-healthy tips – recipe, exercise, stress reducing or other tips? We’d love to hear them, and our readers will appreciate them too. Share them in the comments area.

 


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My Recent Experience with Sensorineural Hearing Loss

Last April, something strange and unexpected happened to me. I noticed that my left ear felt clogged up, as if water was trapped in my ear canal, which was entirely possible from bathing or swimming. I went around for a week or two shaking my head wildly left and right, tugging on my ear lobe and repeatedly Googling terms such as “my ear feels clogged up” and “how to remove water trapped in your ear.” All to no avail. After a few more weeks of waiting for this mysterious symptom to resolve, I made an appointment with an Ear, Nose and Throat specialist (AKA an otolaryngologist, but try saying that three times with your mouth full!), who, after a thorough examination, referred me for a hearing test with an audiologist.

At this point I was a little confused but not at all concerned. It did seem weird that even after having impacted ear wax removed at the ENT’s office, the strange muffled sensation in my ear persisted. The hearing test, my first as an adult, revealed that I have a moderately-severe high frequency loss in my left ear, as well as mild loss in the right ear. Further testing revealed my hearing loss was permanent, unexplained, and that I would need hearing aids for both ears! Trust me when I tell you, I was in complete shock.

I was diagnosed with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). What does this mean? Well, there are three main types of hearing loss: SNHL, conductive, or mixed. SNHL is the most common type of hearing loss. It’s caused by damage to the inner ear or to the nerve pathway from the inner ear to the brain. When SSNL occurs over the course of just a day or two, it is known as sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Some possible causes of SNHL include genetics, aging, head trauma, exposure to loud music, or even certain ototoxic medications that have a deleterious effect on hearing. The truth is, though, like in my case, often a cause can not be determined.

Conductive hearing loss involves the middle or outer ear, and can be caused by things such as colds, allergies, ear infections, Eustachian tube dysfunction, impacted ear wax, or the presence of a foreign body, to name a few. In contrast to SNHL, conductive loss is more frequently treatable and reversible. A mixed hearing loss involves having both sensorineural and conductive loss at the same time.

As soon as I found out that I had partial but irreversible hearing loss that is likely to only get worse over time, I wanted to make sure that I was doing everything in my power to mitigate the communication difficulties that accompany hearing loss. I wasted no time in getting fitted for high quality hearing aids. Hearing aids have come a long way from the “ear trumpets” of days gone by. The latest hearing aids are state of the art, programmable, and designed to be comfortable and unobtrusive. An audiologist works with the patient over time to tweak the settings for optimal effectiveness.

In addition to wearing hearing aids, I am planning on taking a speech/lip reading class, as this skill can be important to help fill in the blanks when in noisy environments such as restaurants. I have only just started to explore assistive listening technologies such as hearing loops and captioning in public venues, as well as personal listening devices. Finally, I have found many organizations online that offer advocacy, education, and support for those affected by hearing loss and related conditions. Having hearing loss is a highly individual experience, but it can be isolating, so it is wonderful to connect with others who understand what it is like and who can offer advice and support.

Sadly, a stigma still surrounds hearing loss in our society. This is part of the reason I wanted to share my personal experience. Stigma makes people feel ashamed and so they keep information to themselves that may actually benefit others also experiencing the same problem. Silence perpetuates stigma, stereotypes, and misinformation. I have decided that even though I may sometimes feel embarrassed or uncomfortable, it is in my best interest to advocate for myself and to be honest about my hearing loss.

My personal advice to anyone experiencing a change in your hearing is to see your doctor ASAP. Even if you think you just have a cold or a clogged up ear, do not delay seeking treatment because some types of sudden hearing loss may be reversible if treated immediately. However, even if you have been avoiding getting treatment for a long-standing problem, please stop burying your head in the sand – there is help! I recently read a statistic that the average hard of hearing person waits seven years before seeking treatment for their hearing loss. People will suffer in silence because of fear or shame rather than admit to a problem that can be effectively treated and managed, leading to an enhanced quality of life.

Depending upon severity and individual circumstances, the effects of hearing loss upon an individual can range from mildly inconvenient to completely life altering, but by addressing your particular situation head on, you can minimize further negative consequences and take control of your life.

There is life after hearing loss!

Andrea L. Dowling has been with HCLS since 2006, and is currently an Assistant Customer Service Supervisor at the HCLS East Columbia Branch. Andrea’s interests include genealogy, travel, reading banned books, and collecting vintage cook books.

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