I love carbs! Technically, our bodies and brain NEED carbs. But the carbohydrates I’m referring to are the “bad” ones. The ones I grew up with: white rice, white potatoes, taro, and all kinds of breads. Frankly, I have a potato problem. I love potatoes in all their glorious forms! However, I am partial to a giant mountain of home made mashed potatoes. So, in order to keep an eye on my blood sugars, I trick myself with one of my favorite low-carb sides: garlic cauliflower mash. It’s a surprisingly delicious way to enjoy cauliflower while simultaneously satisfying those carb cravings for mashed potatoes.

cauliflower mashIngredients: cauliflower, minced garlic, salt, pepper, olive oil, butter, milk (optional: paprika, spinach, white beans, pesto)

Chop a head of cauliflower into florets. You can either blanch the florets in boiling water for 15 minutes, or stem the florets in the microwave or on the stove. You just need to get the cauliflower tender for “mashing.” While florets are cooking, get a small fry pan going with medium heat- then, drizzle a bit of olive oil, add a minced garlic clove. (At this point, you could add add a handful of spinach to lightly wilt in the pan or white beans or pesto or additional seasonings.) Whatever healthy, brave concoction you’ve created in your garlic pan, add to a food processor. Then, drain the water from your blanched cauliflower and add florets to the food processor as well. Blend in food processor with a little bit of salt/pepper, up to 1 Tbsp of butter, and splash of milk until its nearly smooth. Scrape down the sides occasionally. Keep an eye on its consistency so you don’t put it over the edge as a puree. You can also do this step manually with a fork or masher. Either way, it’ll be tasty. Dress up your mash with chives or other fresh herbs.

Another delicious and simple way to get more cauliflower into your diet: cauliflower rice!

My sister-in-love (as opposed to sister-in-law) bought some cauliflower rice from the store the other night. It was basically a head of cauliflower that was pulsed in a food processor and repackaged in a foam tray with a price tag and plastic wrap. Save yourself the extra cost and just get a head of cauliflower. Once your raw cauliflower is pulsed to the point of rice (or cous cous) texture, you should set a fry pan on medium heat with a drizzle of olive oil. You can then add a clove of garlic minced, along with a small white/yellow onion minced, maybe a handful of baby portobellas chopped. Saute until mushrooms are soft and onions are nearly translucent. At that point, add the cauliflower. This is a great base for any and all flavors you’re interested in creating. Simply season with salt and pepper or anything your heart desires! What’s great about cauliflower is that (like rice) it will absorb the seasoning beautifully. I’ve seen Indian cauliflower rice with cumin, turmeric, ginger, etc. The pellets of cauliflower will also absorb the colors of your herbs and spices! Try something fun like a Spanish style cauliflower rice or something Guam-style like achote red-rice (annatto seeds).  

Cauliflower is pretty easy to work with, you just need to put in time. There’s all kinds of great recipes for cauliflower tots (like potato tots), cauliflower soup, cous cous like salad, cauliflower popcorn (deep fried cauliflower), “steaks”, tortillas- the only limit is your imagination! Try out our Paleo cookbooks for more ideas!

 


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“When it comes to eating right, I find it’s so important for food to be tasty, so that you’ll want to keep eating well for a lifetime,” so goes the opening to the super neat and scrumptious The All-Natural Diabetes Cookbook, which covers everything from classic comfort foods to more exotic fare.

all natural diabetesThere are so many good cookbooks out there, but sometimes you just want a few that you can count on again and again to provide you with you healthy (and even happy) meal choices that will never disappoint or deny you enjoyment in your eating life. Whether it is Diabetic Living’s beautiful and wonderful Diabetes Meals by the Plate: 90 Low-Carb Meals to Mix & Match, Jackie Newgent’s The All-Natural Diabetes Cookbook, or Kate Gardner’s The New Diabetes Cookbook: 100 Mouthwatering, Seasonal, Whole-Food Recipes, you will not only want to eat healthy, you will be excited about doing so!

Essential to Jackie Newgent’s philosophy is simplicity, both with time in the kitchen and in choosing the freshest, least-processed foods. One of my favorite recipes in her book is “Buckwheat Banana Pancakes with Walnuts” (page 26). I was surprised to discover that buckwheat is not wheat at all but an herb of Russian descent. Central to Newgent’s cookbook is the idea that non-starchy vegetables promote an essential (and delicious) plant-based approach and that some vegetables can become the entrée, such as yummy cauliflower “steak” (see pages 256-257) “A good rule of thumb,” the registered dietitian nurse says, is “to fill half of your plate with non-starchy vegetables, whether grilled, steamed, roasted, microwave-baked or raw.”

diabetes meals by the plate useJessie Shafer, Food and Nutrition Editor for Diabetic Living, supports the half plate non-starchy veggies “ideal” as well. In the intro to the fabulously colorful and very user friendly cookbook Diabetes Meals by The Plate she explains that the trick to healthful eating is in how you arrange your plate. “Visually divide your plate in half and fill one of those halves with nonstarchy vegetables,” she begins, then “divide the remaining half of the plate in two and fill one quarter with a protein. Fill the last quarter with a serving of grains or other starchy food.” Diabetes Meals by The Plate features dozens of pretty, but more importantly, very tasty and healthy recipes. There are lots of offerings for people who like their meat, but also (and in a very neat and unique way) there are offerings for the vegetarian and “Caribbean Tofu and Beans” (see pages 182 and 183) just jumps off the page with vibrancy and the promise of a terrific meal, even for those normally wary of tofu.

new diabetes cookbookPerhaps the most “foodie” of the cookbooks mentioned here, in terms of looks and taste, though (thankfully) not complexity, is the gorgeous (and mouthwatering) The New Diabetes Cookbook. One of my favorite recipes in the book is for “smoked gouda and broccoli lasagnettes.” (see pages 94 and 95) If you love lasagna as much as the author does then you might understand what she means when she says that one of the things she does not like about it is how easy it is to overeat it. That’s where “lasagnettes,” not lasagna, come in. Lasagnettes are mini lasagnas made in a muffin tin, where wontons are used instead of pasta, which saves on both both carbs and calories. Lasagnettes also travel very well and make for easy on-to-go snacks AND they freeze well.

Kate Gardner wrote The New Diabetes Cookbook knowing that cooking and eating well with diabetes is not always easy. There are the worries about carbohydrate content, blood sugar and making the “right” choices. All three cookbooks mentioned here focus on the belief that eating well with diabetes means eating whole, unprocessed foods in moderate portions. Jackie Newgent calls it “eating real” and makes cooking with vegetables a real joy, even to those who are not veggie lovers. Each color group provides distinctive health benefits and makes for terrific presentation in your meals as well as a tasty treat for your palate. It is the position of the American Diabetes Association that there is not “a one size fits all” pattern to eating and that is delightfully evident in all the wonderful and varied choices delivered in these three cookbooks.

Angie Engles has been with the Howard County Library System for 17 years, 14 of which were at the Savage Branch. She currently works at the Central Branch primarily in the Fiction and Audio-visual departments. Her interests include music, books, and old movies.

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February is American Heart Month. President Obama stated in his proclamation, “Every person can take steps to reduce the risk factors associated with heart disease in themselves and in those they care about –whether as parents, caretakers, or friends—by encouraging healthy eating, physical activity, and by discouraging the use of tobacco.”

go freshOne of the ways to keep your heart healthy is to eat well. Howard County Library System has an extensive collection of cookbooks to help you get started. Go Fresh: A Heart-Healthy Cookbook with Shopping and Storage Tips is one of the cookbooks in a series by the American Heart Association. What I liked best about this cookbook is that most of the ingredients cited I have on hand in my kitchen or I know I can find easily in the grocery store. This cookbook includes in an appendix a list of the approximate equivalents in weight and volume for the most common vegetables and fruits. Also included in the appendices, are vegetable cooking times and a food storage guide. I learned it is best to store fresh herbs, such as parsley, dill, and cilantro, in the refrigerator in a juice glass half-filled with water and, covered loosely with plastic. Now let’s get to the recipes, which by the way, include desserts! My boys liked the Peppered Sirloin with Steakhouse Onions (p.167) and I liked the Ancho Chicken and Black Bean Salad with Cilantro-Lime Dressing (p.96). We are going to try the Buffalo Chicken with Slaw (p.147) next. I think I can even convince them to try one of the vegetarian entrées, especially if we can have Soft-Serve Blueberry-Cinnamon Ice Cream (p. 297) for dessert! Visit the library to find more cookbooks from the American Heart Association, including titles on slow cooking, reducing sodium, and reducing bad fats.

secrets of healthy cookingI also recommend Barbara Seelig-Brown’s Secrets of Healthy Cooking: A Guide to Simplifying the Art of Heart Healthy and Diabetic Cooking published by the American Diabetes Association. This cookbook is great for the new cook because it includes sections on building a pantry for healthy cooking, an essential equipment list, a kitchen glossary, how to read a recipe, and the must-know basic wine pairing. I found the fish know-how section very helpful. I am not a fan of seafood, so I liked the tip “…if you don’t like fish, then disguising it with strong flavors is for you.” There are colorful pictures throughout the book that illustrate step-by-step how to, for example, cook in parchment, steam shrimp, peal and chop garlic, cut a mango, cook with wine, make pizza/calzone dough, or a phyllo pie crust. My favorite recipes were the salad pizza (p. 28) and the crunchy quinoa stuffed zucchini (p. 99). The next time my kids are all home I might just feel brave enough to try the lemon garlic shrimp on a cucumber flower (p. 82). What I liked about this cookbook is that it is perfect for both the beginner cook and the experienced cook.

Healthy eating and cooking can make a difference in improving your cardiovascular health. Some of the foods that are heart-healthy include fish high in omega-3s, such as salmon and tuna, healthy nuts such as almonds or walnuts, berries, such as blueberries and strawberries, dark beans, such as kidney or black beans, and red, yellow, and orange veggies. You can find more information on heart healthy foods at  Johns Hopkins Medicine. This month when you’re shopping for your valentine, remember that your loved ones need you to take care of the most important heart of all, your own. After looking at these cookbooks in your local library, you might just be inspired to cook a healthy-heart meal instead of making that reservation.

Nancy Targett is an Instructor & Research Specialist at the Miller Branch. She lives in Columbia and is the proud mom of three boys and a girl and a Siamese cat.

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thanksgiving diet tips

[© Dmitriy Shironosov | Dreamstime.com]

And Any Upcoming Holiday Meal!

Everyone loves the holidays – a time for family and friends gathering and sharing meals and memories. Between turkey and stuffing and pies, this is also a time that is easy to fall off the healthy eating wagon and gain unwanted pounds. However, Thanksgiving does not always have to sabotage your waistline.

Below are some tips to enjoy your Thanksgiving while staying healthy:

  • Don’t overeat: It is easy on Thanksgiving with so many options and food in front of us to overeat. Skip the seconds by waiting at least twenty minutes after your meal to let your body realize if it is full or not. Have the turkey be the only thing that is stuffed this year!
  • Exercise: Put in a little extra exercise around the holidays before treating yourself to your Thanksgiving feast. Increasing the length of your workout and exercising to burn off the calories before you consume them is a good trick. In addition to exercising before your Thanksgiving meal, take a walk after dinner and plan a workout date for the following day.
  • Stay hydrated: Drinking water throughout the day will keep you hydrated and keep hunger pains, that may actually be thirst, to a minimum. Also, go easy on alcohol where calories can sneak up on you.
  • Eat breakfast: Many follow the myth of skipping breakfast to save their appetite for the Thanksgiving feast – but this could actually be detrimental. Not eating until later in the day can easily lead to binging.
  • Eat fewer appetizers: By staying away from appetizers that you can have any day of the year, you save your appetite for the main course.
  • Try healthier recipes: If you are cooking or bringing a dish to Thanksgiving, lighten up your dishes by using less sugar and fat. Typically, no one will notice the difference if you scale back and use lower calorie ingredients.

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Thanksgiving dinner has to be the most favored hedonistic joys of the holidays. It kicks off the season of excused gluttony with family and friends. Thanksgiving dinner is second only to the Halloween candy binge and is truly the beginning of bad food decisions for the winter months. Oh, the sheer excitement of pigging out with those you love only to collapse in a heap on the couch to watch football. Oh yes, I LOVE Thanksgiving, but the results of the aforementioned food binge don’t help me meet my health goals. Believe me, losing weight, staying healthy, and making food decisions around the holidays is tough, but it’s necessary. Here are some swaps to consider.

  1. Cauliflower mash is awesome. I was skeptical myself at first, but this is one really tasty way to make your Thanksgiving dinner less fattening and more interesting. Check out this recipe for garlic cauliflower mash, 600 plus reviewers can’t be wrong, right? Also, try Brassicas for more healthy vegetable based dishes.
  2. Sweet potatoes slathered in butter and toasted marshmallows are sweetly decadent. Unfortunately, for most people, and particularly diabetics, the extra sugars (and fat) in this traditional dish would require a serious bolus shot of insulin and a several days of cross fit sessions to counteract the damage. Instead, opt for a savory herb casserole packed with flavor not with empty calories. Vegetable Literacy may have the right recipe for you. Please, stay strong, you don’t need those toasted marshmallows, you just want them.
  3. Stuffing is, in my book, a hearty, gratifying, carb-city of deliciousness. Unfortunately, this dish is a real pain for many of my family members. Celiac is no joke and stuffing is a nightmare of sorts for those living with the disease. Celiac Creations for Multiple Allergies is a 2015 title that may help find the right substitute to satisfy that stuffing craving.
  4. Lay off the booze or seriously reduce your intake. I get it, everyone wants to have a drink once in a while, but sometimes it seems like people use the holidays as an excuse to… well, binge. Listen, I know you’ve either been to a holiday party (or heard about) where someone went overboard with the punch and, well, got a little too “punchy.” Trust me, that’s never pretty. Binge drinking hurts your body in numerous ways. Instead, opt for a small glass of sparkling juice or mix sparkling water with fresh fruit if you need a little bubbly. Cool Waters has some great low and no-cal drinks you can try. If you do choose to drink, limit your intake, and always have a plan for getting around town or getting back home. A glass of wine or a couple beers may not hurt you, but you could hurt someone else.
  5. Go for a walk or play a game of touch football in the yard. O.K. I know this isn’t a “food swap,” but it’s definitely a way to switch things up. Instead of sinking into that couch post-turkey feast to watch the Panthers & Cowboys, go outside and take a walk around your neighborhood. Besides, the Bears-Packers game will be much more interesting (what with the recent jinx conspiracy based on Ditka doing that fast food commercial wearing Packers’ gear). Basically, if you don’t do any Thanksgiving food swaps, but do go for a walk or do some exercise after your meal, you’ll reduce your blood sugars and, at least, feel like you’re burning a few of those extra calories.

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It’s summertime which means cookout season is in full swing! Whether you are hosting or attending a cookout, it is always difficult to stick to your diet or a healthy eating plan with all the delicious temptations surrounding you. Just keep in mind there are a variety of alternatives to add a healthier menu to your cookout which go beyond the traditional hot dogs and hamburgers!

Healthy tips for your next cookout:

 

  • Ditch the Chips – Substitute potato chips and French onion dip for raw veggies accompanied by hummus, salsa or guacamole. These snacks are not only better for you, they taste great and keep you full! Still crave that crunch? Try kale chips or a pickle! [© Jenifoto406 | Dreamstime.com]
  • Grill Outside the Box – Trade your regular ground beef burger for a lean meat such as chicken, sirloin, fish, pork or skinless turkey breast. Other popular, tasty options are salmon (or any fish!), black bean, portobello or veggie burgers. Don’t limit yourself to meat. Pineapple, peaches and vegetables are great grillers, too! Or fill a skewer with mushrooms, peppers, tomatoes, zucchini, squash and tomatoes. [© stockcreations | Dreamstime.com]
  • Talking Turkey (Dogs) – Switch your regular frank for a turkey dog to get that great hot dog flavor at a fraction of the calories and fat. If you are on a reduced sodium diet, read the label. [© Trudywilkerson | Dreamstime.com]
  • Calorie Counting – Using 100 percent whole grain sandwich thins is an easy way to cut down the calories. Go even lighter by ditching the bun altogether or prepare meat that doesn't require a bun. You can also say no to mayo in your salads by using a lighter alternative such as Greek yogurt or vinegar. [© Cardiae | Dreamstime.com]
  • Be Fruitful – Dessert doesn’t have to be a sugary sweet. Replace cookies and cakes with a naturally sweet fruit or fruit salad. [© Photodeti | Dreamstime.com]
  • Sweet Drinks – Trade your sugary beverages for water and add flavor by infusing with lemons, fresh strawberries or other fruit, mint, ginger or cucumbers! Low sugar lemonade or teas are also great options. [© Evgenyb | Dreamstime.com]

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