calendar_2015_blog

Tuesday, Jan. 27, 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. $35. Dietary Counseling with a registered dietitian one-on-one to discuss your dietary concerns and goals including weight loss, healthier bones, high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol in Howard County General Hospital’s Wellness Center.

Thursday, Jan. 29, 10:15 a.m. & 11:30 a.m. Healthy Kids at Miller. Explore simple health concepts inspired by children’s literature. Ages 3-5 with adult; 45 min. Multi-week series. Well & Wise event. Limited space; tickets available at Children’s Desk 15 minutes before class. Ticket Required.

Monday, Feb. 2, 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Glenwood Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

Monday, Feb. 2, 5:30-7 p.m. Free  Weight Loss through Bariatric Surgery presentation about surgical weight loss options available through the Johns Hopkins Center for Bariatric Surgery in Howard County General Hospital’s Wellness Center. Hear program requirements and how to navigate the insurance approval process. Call 410-550-KNOW.

Tuesday, Feb. 3, 7:00 p.m. Guided Meditation at Miller Branch.  Enjoy a guided mindfulness meditation designed to impart a feeling of peacefulness and connection. Please bring a cushion or meditation pillow. Presented by Star Ferguson, M.Ac., L.Ac. Registration is required. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

Tuesday, Feb. 3, 7:00 p.m. Conflict Resolution Techniques on the Sidelines at Miller Branch. Learn diplomatic and effective methods to handle conflicts at sporting events and everyday situations. Discover basic techniques to identify the conflict and how to use non-defensive language to diffuse the situation. Presented by Cecilia B. Paizs, Esq., of The Mediation Center in Ellicott City. Registration is required. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

Monday, Feb. 9, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Savage Branch.  Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. 2nd Mondays. No registration required.

Monday, Feb. 9, 7:00 p.m. Calming Crafts at Miller Branch. Research shows that creative activities can boost serotonin levels. Join us as we use artistic expression to improve our moods. All levels of artistic ability welcome. Registration is required. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.


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Ah, January. That magic time of year when you resolve to lose weight, eat healthy, and get more exercise. I think April would be a much better time to make those kinds of resolutions. But even in these short, cold days there are always opportunities to get up and get moving. Childrens’ classes at Howard County Library System are great places to shake your sillies out. Join us and find some great picture books to help the whole family get their groove on.

kitchen dance“Scrape! Splash! Clunk! Clang! … I hear kitchen sounds,” says the curly-headed narrator as she and her little brother wake up to the sounds of their parents’ kitchen dance. Creeping downstairs, they see mother and father as “side by side with stacked plates they glide,” turning the routine of washing-up into a tango. When Mama spots the two children, she and Papa sweep them up into an affectionate foursome, all singing, “Como te quiero!” Maurie J. Manning depicts this Afro-Latino family with bright colors providing movement and warmth as Papa and Mama strut their stuff. Their joyful inclusion of the kids makes this book read like one long hug—as the narrator says, after being tucked back into bed with a couple extra besitos, “Umm, hmm.”.

Take the opportunity to bust out your favorite moves with your littles and create a family moment.

you are a lionThe popularity of yoga has even babies practicing asanas, and this picture book is a fun way to get toddlers started. Paired spreads introduce a pose in simple non-rhyming verse, accompanied by an image of a child on a small circle of grass in the middle of white pages; the spread that follows reveals the pose in a nature setting along with the creature the pose imitates. The instructions for the poses are extremely basic and the illustrations encourage participation. The sweet, colorful illustrations include an ethnically diverse group of children demonstrating such poses as a lion, a cobra, and downward-facing dog. The soft hues and natural settings convey the spirit of a yoga class. The text reads almost like haiku. There is no discussion of yoga and the activities could be used to corral the energy of a rowdy group or an individual child.

Yoga is one of the few forms of exercise I practice consistently. It can be as vigorous or as gentle as the season and mood demand. HCLS has a great collection of books and DVDs to start a home practice.

i got rhythmRhythm is everywhere in this celebratory jaunt through an urban neighborhood, from the drummer in the park to playground games to the subtle beat of butterfly wings. The straightforward narrative captures the engaging ways the narrator finds her own rhythm exploring the world around her. Schofield-Morrison’s text pulses with a beat of its own and practically demands audiences to clap along. Each double-page spread offers interactive elements presenting each way the narrator catches the rhythm (hands, knees, feet, and more) to the fun readers can have joining in and keeping the rhythm with their own bodies. Morrison’s oil-on-canvas illustrations complement the story with expansive spreads crackling with movement, the saturated color palette helps the action jump off the page. The urban setting and varied cast depict diversity as an integral part of everyday life.

From board books like Sandra Boynton’s Philadelphia Chickens (cow chorus lines!) to Steve Jenkins’ Move! (a fascinating pictorial study of animal movement)- picture books will help everyone “Get Active.”

Shirley ONeill works for Howard County Library System as the Children’s and Teen Materials Specialist. She cannot believe she actually gets paid to do this job.

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diet soda canRecent studies have shown that intake of artificial sweeteners may contribute to glucose intolerance. Those of us who enjoy diet drinks and cut calories by selecting foods with sugar substitutes may decide that the trade-off is not the healthy choice. We may want to think twice before satisfying cravings for Diet Coke and go for an unsweetened iced tea instead.

Glucose intolerance is a serious health risk because it can lead to diabetes as well as metabolic syndrome. Diabetes is characterized by the body’s inability to produce insulin to process sugar intake. Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas that is needed by the body to regulate glucose levels. Metabolic syndrome is a set of biochemical changes that increases one’s risk for heart disease and diabetes. The physiologic changes in metabolic syndrome include glucose intolerance, abnormal lipid levels, insulin resistance and obesity.

The human intestines are filled with microscopic living organisms, the so-called “gut flora.” A normal intestinal environment is home to these organisms, most of which are bacteria. A study published in the 9/18/2014 issue of Nature described findings that intake of artificial sweeteners changes the composition and function of this flora. The researchers fed mice three of the most commonly-used sugar alternatives: aspartame (Equal), saccharin (Sweet’N Low) and sucralose (Splenda). The mice drinking the artificially-sweetened water had altered intestinal bacteria and marked glucose intolerance. Antibiotics administered to kill this bacteria resulted in resolution of the glucose intolerance.

Additional research was carried out on a limited number of human subjects. Nondiabetic subjects who reported artificial sweetener use were more likely to develop glucose intolerance over time than were those who stated they did not use artificial sweeteners. These participants also were more likely to show changes in gut flora. The researchers gave seven human subjects high levels of saccharin over six days, and four of thee subjects then had abnormal sugar levels. The scientists theorize that the altered combination of bacteria causes a change in glucose metabolism, blocking the sugar levels from declining as quickly as they should.

Although the study’s authors point out that the percentages supporting their findings are statistically significant, they note that more studies are needed. Over the past several years, evidence has accumulated that intake of artificial sweeteners increases sugar cravings. Some studies have even shown that those who use artificial sweeteners are more likely to be overweight. Now with the possibility that these additives can have serious health effects such as diabetes, the support for decreased ingestion of artificial sweeteners grows. The research findings indicate that it might be time to cut back on total intake, perhaps drinking one fewer can of diet soda per day and selecting a snack of nuts or blueberries rather than sugar-free cookies. Limited consumption of products with artificial sweeteners could be important to limiting the associated health risks. Similar to other medical recommendations regarding nutrition and fitness, the guidance at this point is moderation.

Cherise Tasker is an Instructor & Research Specialist at the Central Branch and has a background in health information. Most evenings, Cherise can be found reading a book, attending a book club meeting, or coordinating a book group.

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Saturday, Jan. 17, 2:00 p.m. I’m Going to Be a Big Brother or Sister at Central Branch. Prepare for the arrival of a baby in this class for new siblings. Enjoy stories, activities, and bring a favorite doll or stuffed animal to practice holding your baby. Resources for parents, too. Families; 30 – 45 min. Ticket required.In partnership with Howard County General Hospital: A Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. Limited space; tickets available at Children’s Desk 15 minutes before class.

Saturday, Jan. 17, 3:00 p.m. Hands Only CPR & AED at Savage Branch. You could save a life! Learn about cardiac arrest, how to recognize it’s happening, and the three simple steps of hands-only CPR for victims over 8 years old. Receive a basic overview of an automated external defibrillator (AED). Ages 9-18; 60 min. Registration is required. Register online or by calling 410.313.0760.

Tuesday, Jan. 20, 5:30-7 p.m. Free  Weight Loss through Bariatric Surgery presentation about surgical weight loss options available through the Johns Hopkins Center for Bariatric Surgery in Howard County General Hospital’s Wellness Center. Hear program requirements and how to navigate the insurance approval process. Call 410-550-KNOW.

Thursday, Jan. 22, 10:15 a.m. & 11:30 a.m. Healthy Kids at Miller Branch.  Explore simple health concepts inspired by children’s literature. Ages 3-5 with adult; 45 min. Multi-week series. Well & Wise event. Limited space; tickets available at Children’s Desk 15 minutes before class. Ticket Required.

Thursday, Jan. 29, 10:15 a.m. & 11:30 a.m. Healthy Kids at Miller. Explore simple health concepts inspired by children’s literature. Ages 3-5 with adult; 45 min. Multi-week series. Well & Wise event. Limited space; tickets available at Children’s Desk 15 minutes before class. Ticket Required.

 


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destructive relationshipsI have bonded with many people throughout my life; building a lot of different relationships of varying degrees, some lasting longer than others. I have friends that I have known since elementary school that I still make a point of seeing, even if it’s not as often as we’d all like. The great thing about it is that we always fall right back into rhythm and savor that comforting familiarity. I also have close friends that I get to see more often and enjoy spending the majority of my free time with them because they bring me a tremendous amount of joy. However, this doesn’t mean that everyone I have met so far has been a “keeper.”

As we all start a new year, it’s important to set goals for ourselves, try something new, change a bad habit, or create any other sort of resolution that we need in our lives. This year, I decided to skip the fad diet that I won’t stick to. Instead, I want to continue to explore what defines my own happiness so I can make the necessary changes. A big part of this has to deal with eliminating the people in my life that are bringing me down.

It’s important to evaluate all of your relationships and ask yourself how each one affects you and your happiness. It’s never easy to cut people out of your life, but in many cases it may be for the better. Maybe someone is holding you back or isn’t willing to make the necessary changes in their own life to grow and mature. You must respect yourself enough to say “no” to those toxic people who are demanding of your time and energy.

ten minutes ten months ten yearsIt’s not easy to admit, but I’ve allowed toxic people to be an important part of my life for longer than they deserved. I gave them too many chances and then, gave them “one more” so they could prove to me that I wasn’t making a mistake in doing so. Sadly, it was a mistake. Those chances only left me confused. How could a person I cared about disregard all of my kindness and continue on with their selfish and inconsiderate pattern? Once I realized that the problem didn’t come from my end, I was able to accept that sometimes a person needs to reach a certain point in their life on their own. Sure, I could have kept being supportive, but to what end? What difference did it make if I wasn’t really getting through to the person? I didn’t want to be disappointed anymore. I realized that my own happiness was more important. I decided that instead of being ever-so-willing to do favors for others that I needed to do the biggest favor of all for myself: take care of me. Allowing myself to let go of someone that I loved and wishing them nothing but the best was tough, but necessary.

Digging deep and coming to the conclusion that I needed to follow through with a difficult decision didn’t make me any less of the genuine person I have worked toward being. It didn’t make me stop being kind to others or even discourage me from helping those who need it. Instead, I felt like I had gained a new level of respect for myself. This year, I hope you not only succeed in all of the goals that you have set for yourself, but also take the time to really look at who enhances your happiness and simply let go of those who aren’t on that list.

Laci Radford is an Instructor & Research Specialist at the Savage Branch and STEM Education Center. She is a music lover, writer, and an avid reader. She enjoys attending concerts, plays, and other forms of live entertainment. Her favorite activities include scoping out unique items at thrift stores, bonfires with friends, and having tie-dye parties. She is studying Psychology and plans to become a music and art therapist sooner rather than later.

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you know when the men are goneNow, more than ever, American readers owe it to themselves to gain a deeper understanding of the emotional, psychological, spiritual, and social toll that war – and its after-effect has on U.S. military families.

In, You Know When The Men Are Gone, Siobhan Fallon’s exquisitely linked short story collection, eight distinct experiences, become ours as well:

Meg Brady, of 12A, has become obsessed with her neighbor, Natalya Torres, whose self-serving behavior and Heidi Klum beauty belie terrible secrets—some of which Meg cannot help, nor resist overhearing on the other side of their thin, shared wall. Frantic Ellen Roddy forgoes an imperative visit to her oncologist when she learns that her troubled fifteen-year-old daughter may have kidnapped her own baby brother. And a woman wants to go back in time when she stumbles on an email that could alter her life forever.

Drama and deployment are illuminated in You Know When The Men Are Gone, by first-time author, and army major wife, Siobhan Fallon.
Set on army housing at Fort Hood, Texas, these stories have a dynamic relationship, as characters you meet in one move through the pages of another—surprising, even shocking readers.
And although Fallon is not gender exclusive, her focus is indeed the wives: their intricate kinships and ability to steel themselves for everything from homework to gossip to military readiness is, at times, heart-wrenching.

But best of all, Fallon writes with amazing grace, capturing the fragility and resilience of an American culture sworn to protect us in the event of war.

Aimee Zuccarini

Aimee Zuccarini is an Instructor & Research Specialist at the East Columbia Branch. She facilitates several book discussions and writes the book reviews for The Maryland Women’s Journal.

 


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calendar_2015_blogMonday, Jan. 12, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Savage Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. 2nd Mondays. No registration required.

Monday, Jan. 12, 10:30 a.m. & 11:15 a.m. Tae Kwon Do: Tiny Tigers at Miller Branch. Sykesville Tae Kwon Do instructors focus on motor skills, listening, and taking turns. Wear athletic shoes and loose fitting pants or shorts. Well & Wise event. Ages 3-5 with adult; 30 min. Registration and a signed release form is required.
10:30 a.m. Registration & Signed Release Form
11:15 a.m. Registration & Signed Release Form

Monday, Jan. 12, 7:00 p.m. Calming Crafts at Miller Branch. Research shows that creative activities can boost serotonin levels. Join us as we use artistic expression to improve our moods. All levels of artistic ability welcome. Registration is required. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

Tuesday, Jan. 13, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Elkridge Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. 2nd Tuesdays. No registration required.

Thursday, Jan. 15, 10:15 a.m. & 11:30 a.m. Healthy Kids at Miller Branch. Explore simple health concepts inspired by children’s literature. Ages 3-5 with adult; 45 min. Multi-week series. Well & Wise event. Limited space; tickets available at Children’s Desk 15 minutes before class. Ticket Required.

Saturday, Jan. 17, 2:00 p.m. I’m Going to Be a Big Brother or Sister at Central Branch. Prepare for the arrival of a baby in this class for new siblings. Enjoy stories, activities, and bring a favorite doll or stuffed animal to practice holding your baby. Resources for parents, too. Families; 30 – 45 min. Ticket required.In partnership with Howard County General Hospital: A Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. Limited space; tickets available at Children’s Desk 15 minutes before class.

Saturday, Jan. 17, 3:00 p.m. Hands Only CPR & AED at Savage Branch. You could save a life! Learn about cardiac arrest, how to recognize it’s happening, and the three simple steps of hands-only CPR for victims over 8 years old. Receive a basic overview of an automated external defibrillator (AED). Ages 9-18; 60 min. Registration is required. Register online or by calling 410.313.0760.

 


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icecream-ipodHappy New Year, and welcome to 2015! Will the babies born this year be the start of a new generation, or will they fall into the growing cohort of “Generation Z”? What will define them? What qualities will they possess? How will the other generations view them? Should we even give a flying fig?

Believe it or not, it is that last question that interests me most of all. Yes, you read correctly; I am most concerned with whether or not we should “give a flying fig.” (Has she lost her mind? Is she recovering from too much New Year celebrating? Is she just desperately trying to fill blog-space?) Well, the last one may be a little true, but I assure you, for the most part, I am legitimately posing this question: Why are we so keen to label and define generations, and is there any validity or potential danger in doing so?

Don’t get me wrong; classifying certain periods of time, especially by some specific events that helped shape the way people lived during those times, is not without use. Even creating handy labels can make discussing a particular generation flow a little better. (Face it, it’s easier to say “The Lost Generation” than “people typically born between 1883 and 1900 who were disillusioned by the war.” Thank you, Gertrude Stein.)

It was The Lost Generation that seemed to really set the trend for naming generations in Western Civilization, particularly the U.S. After that, we have The Greatest Generation (born around 1901 through 1924); The Silent Generation, sometimes called Traditionalists, (1925 through 1942); the Baby Boomers (1943 up through the early 1960s); Generation X (early 1960s through early 1980s); Millennials (early 1980s through early 2000s); and Generation Z (which, at the moment seems to be anyone born in or after the late 1990s or early 2000s through the present. As with most generational labels, however, Z will be more clearly defined after some time has passed).

fast futureThese generational cohorts are interesting and the people born into them do seem to exhibit some shared characteristics (mainly defined by shared events that they’ve experienced, such as economic or political climate, or world events like war or technological advances). Books or studies that examine say, for instance, how many Millennials are comfortable with technology, having been born into it, and how this is affecting the world, like in Fast Future by David Burstein, seem useful, or at least interesting. Other media discussion of generations, some that even focuses on negatives, like the economic worries caused by the larger number of Baby Boomers retiring, as discussed in The Next America by Paul Taylor, also seem realistic, or at least measurable.

But is it fair or right or even healthy to make broad generalizations about someone born during a particular time period? Can we really assume that Millennials are entitled, that Gen Xers are cynical, that Boomers are workaholics, that Traditionalists are rigid rule followers? (On the flip side, we can’t assume that all Millennials value diversity, that all Gen Xers are self-reliant, that all Boomers are optimistic, or that all Traditionalist are loyal.)

the next americaI’m raising this issue now because 2014 seemed like the year of the “generation generalization” to me. I couldn’t go online without seeing something claiming that “Millennials are this” and “Baby Boomers are that.” I found all these claims upsetting for a number of reasons: 1. Many of the claims were less than flattering (Millennials are especially taking a hit, and that is a shame for any group, but especially for one just starting to make its way in the world); 2. I have friends and colleagues of all ages, and I don’t want them to be stereotyped or discriminated against because of age, nor do I want to be; 3. As someone born smack in the middle of the Gen X group, I remember the uncomfortable and stigmatizing feeling I had, particularly as a young adult, when I was “defined” as being shiftless and morbid and apathetic; and 4. Respectable thinkers, news organizations, employers, and many other surprising sources seem to be taking these generational descriptions a little too much to heart, to the point that it is causing some strife for young and old. (Plus, I believe it is irresponsible, lazy science. ←If you do nothing else, please click on this link; I love this article.)

Seriously, reading all these descriptions of how a certain generation is supposed to behave, what that generation values or not, and why that generation is often to blame for some world problems was really starting to upset me. Plus the consequences can be severe; generational biases can even lead to stereotype threat, which is kind of like self-fulfilling prophecies, but with the stereotype determining the action of the person or people being stereotyped. I kept wondering if my reaction to this was the result of too much social media exposure (that’s another topic for another time). So I began to look around and found, happily, that plenty of organizations, from the APA to the AMA, are acknowledging that these generation generalizations can be wrong, hurtful, and limiting. I’m sure that we can see the dangers of all the different kinds of stereotypes in the world and have long fought to dispel many of them.

My wish for everyone for 2015, myself included, is to begin to question all these generational generalizations as well. I think this should be the year that we try to banish any gross assumptions and start making our judgments one individual at a time, as we get to know each person.

Joanne Sobieck-Lingg is glad to blog about her many, disparate interests (though expert in none, except maybe parenthetical asides). In past lives, she was a writer, proofreader, editor, project manager, teacher, and even co-coordinator of a certain health blog. She has been happily ensconced among the fiction and teen books at the Central Branch of HCLS since 2003.

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calendar_2015_blogMonday, Jan. 5, 10:30 a.m. & 11:15 a.m. Tae Kwon Do: Mommy & Me at Miller Branch. Mommy and child participate in a fun-filled activity, led by instructors from Sykesville Tae Kwon Do, while developing movement awareness, motor skills, balance, coordination, flexibility, and agility. Wear athletic shoes and loose fitting pants or shorts. Well & Wise event. Ages 2-3 with adult; 30 min.
10:30 a.m. Registration and a signed release form is required.
11:15 a.m. Registration and a signed release form is required.

Monday, Jan. 5, 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Glenwood Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

Tuesday, Jan. 6, 7:00 p.m. Guided Meditation at Miller Branch. Enjoy a guided mindfulness meditation designed to impart a feeling of peacefulness and connection. Please bring a cushion or meditation pillow. Presented by Star Ferguson, M.Ac., L.Ac. Registration is required. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

Thursday, Jan. 8, 10:15 a.m. & 11:30 a.m. Healthy Kids at Miller Branch. Explore simple health concepts inspired by children’s literature. Ages 3-5 with adult; 45 min. Multi-week series. Well & Wise event. Limited space; tickets available at Children’s Desk 15 minutes before class. Ticket Required.

Thursday, Jan. 8, 7:00 p.m. Cutting Edge Discoveries in Neuroscience to Boost Your Brain (Part 3) at Miller Branch. As this three-part series continues, Majid Fotuhi, M.D., Ph.D., teaches how to boost brain capacity at any age. The founder and chief medical officer of NeurExpand, Fotuhi has written three books about brain health: Boost Your Brain: The New Art and Science Behind Enhanced Brain Performance; The Memory Cure; and The New York Times Crosswords to Keep Your Brain Young: The 6-Step Age-Defying Program. Fotuhi received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School and his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His research findings have been published in The Journal of Neuroscience, The Lancet, Nature, Neurology, Neuron, and The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Fotuhi has been featured on PBS, The Dr. Oz Show, CNN, Discovery Channel, NBC’s TODAY show, and numerous other national media.Registration is required. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.


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Welcome to 2015! We’ve got a clean slate and 364 more days to achieve our new goals. So, what exactly are you hoping to do in 2015? I asked readers to answer the question: “What’s your New Year’s resolution?” Here’s what they said:

My New Year’s Resolution? Sure, I’d like to lose some weight, eat better, exercise more, learn some thing (or things) new, work harder, smile more, kvetch less… But really, I’d like to work on being kinder, a bit more patient, and a better citizen of the world. These should be my everyday resolutions. – Joanne

Training for and running my first marathon. – Anna

Gratitude. I want to be more grateful for my comfortable existence and appreciative of all the wonderful people in my life. – Cherise

Get married. – Jake
Eat Healthier. – Diane
Stay alive. – Rosalie

Touch it once! [An example:] Take off your shoes – and instead of leaving them in the hallway, put them away. – Tracy

Keep a Gratitude List. – Maryam

Say “no,” more often. – Monica S.

Play the piano, again. – Carolyn

Cook more! – Monica L.

Keep one resolution for the entire year – OK, maybe just until spring! – Nancy

I would like to be more creative for food. Why not meatball waffles? – TJ
Life is about milestones not the Government’s stamped bill. 2015 I plan to continue my exploration of my photographic passion. My focus will further my son in school and continue showing him school can be fun. And finally I want to further my relationship with my wife. Marriage will never plateau. – Matt
 
To turn 42 unscathed! – Stephanie
 
Travel. Always travel. – Beth
 
To have a kitchen. Oh wait… I’ll go with self-care. – Rachel

To unpack the boxes that have been upstairs for 6 months! – Megan

Walk. – Shirley
 
Clean out my basement. – Eileen

To work harder and be nicer. – Tim
 
To travel more! – Nik

I have signed up for “52 Weeks to an Organized Home” (I do well with lists), joined “One a Month Meals,” and developed a financial plan to help with [managing] my money better. My goal this year is to organize my life. Disorganization sucks time and energy. I am so lucky to have so many wonderful people in my life, I need to get [myself] together so I have more time and energy to spend with them. – Colleen
 
My resolution is no to never make any more resolutions! – Karl

To dis-assemble my “need to please” wiring and learn how to say “NO,” and be a more patient mommy too. – Sarah
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Making resolutions is easy; following through is the hard part.

this year I willM.J. Ryan, author, notable publishing CEO, and business consultant, wrote a book about this difficult task of making lasting change in our lives. Her book, This Year I Will– : How to Finally Change a Habit, Keep a Resolutionor Make a Dream Come True (2006), is absolutely relevant today and more profound than I expected for a “self-help” book. Briefly and effectively, Ryan offers credible advice and insight to the struggles we have with achieving our goals via vivid anecdotes, explanations of the advances in neurological science, and sound, logical reasoning. Possibly one of the best “how-to” books I’ve come across in a while, this book will make you feel like change is not only possible, but achievable.

This book will help you understand what’s holding you back and give you the tools you need to “try, try again.” Motivation is gift, and there’s plenty of it in this title to give you a good push in the right direction- especially if you’re feeling a bit stuck, or overwhelmed by the resolutions you’ve set for yourself. If you’re doing pretty well and feel good about the direction of your life, this book will only help you find that spark of inspiration that you didn’t realize you were missing.

As for me, I think 2015 is going to be a year in which I do all that I can to explore, reinvent, and pay attention to what I need to maintain a wholly healthy life.

I hope 2015 is the year you drive change in your life for a better, healthier, happier you.

JP is the HCLS Editor & Blog Coordinator for Well & Wise. She is also a Children’s Instructor & Research Specialist at the Savage Branch & STEM Education Center. She is a storyteller, wannabe triathlete, KPOP-addict, baker of cupcakes, cancer survivor, and liver transplant recipient.

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Much is being written about the “anti-inflammation diet” and the foods which definitely cause inflammation. Believe it or not, you have always known a great deal about inflammation. Consider the first time you fell down, bumped your knee, and it swelled and reddened; that’s the beneficial protective process our body uses to heal itself after being injured. However, that’s not the kind of inflammation I’m talking about.

When the immune system goes awry and attacks healthy cells, chronic inflammation occurs. Autoimmune diseases—Bright’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease and psoriasis—take over. Research indicates that chronic inflammation may also play a role in heart disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s disease. Research is still ongoing. We have much to learn about the immune system and inflammation.

While no one food has been proven to eliminate inflammation, the impact of certain foods may suppress it. We do not yet know how much of these foods is needed, how often, and in what specific situations. Beware of claims that consumption of a certain herb or food will heal your ills! Evidence supporting the foods and inflammation is limited. However, some research suggests that fatty fish, berries, and tart cherries may play a part in reducing inflammation.

Dieticians promote a well-rounded healthy diet to reduce inflammation. This includes:

  • Whole grains as opposed to refined ones
  • Plant-based sources of protein (nuts, legumes, quinoa) rather than red meats
  • Lean meats and limited low-fat dairy
  • Fatty fish such as salmon and sardines
  • Healthy oils such as olive oil, avocados, nuts and seeds, rather than animal fats
  • A variety of vegetables and fruits, especially dark leafy greens, berries, and the orange carotein-rich vegetables

Finally, remember that your entire lifestyle dictates your health: quality sleep, exercise, and keeping a healthy weight are also vital to maintain a healthy immune system.

A Selection of Topical Books from Howard County Library System

anti inflammation zone clean cuisine digestive health with real food perricone weight loss diet.

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anti inflammatory foods for health.anti inflammation diet for dummies idiots guide anti inflammation diet anti inflammation diet and recipe book

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Author’s Sources: HCLSHopkins MedicineWebMd, EatRight, & Epicurious.

Jean has been working at Howard County Library System’s Central Branch for nearly nine years. She walks in the Benjamin Banneker Park whenever she gets a chance.

 


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Through Jan. 4, 2015 Symphony of Lights, a 20-minute drive through more than 70 larger-than-life holiday light displays, benefiting Howard County General Hospital, is open nightly from 6 to 10 p.m. through Jan. 4, 2015 (closed on Tuesdays and Dec. 31). The display, presented by Macy’s, is in Columbia’s Symphony Woods. Admission is $20 per car or van up to eight. $5 off coupon.

Wednesday, Dec. 31, 5-8 p.m. Midnight at 7 at Columbia’s Symphony of Lights is a New Year’s Eve celebration for families with fireworks at 7 p.m. (weather permitting). The event includes a walk through holiday light displays, music, entertainment and giveaways. Proceeds benefit Howard County General Hospital.

Monday, Jan. 5, 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Glenwood Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

Tuesday, Jan. 6, 7:00 p.m. Guided Meditation at Miller Branch. Enjoy a guided mindfulness meditation designed to impart a feeling of peacefulness and connection. Please bring a cushion or meditation pillow. Presented by Star Ferguson, M.Ac., L.Ac. Registration is required. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

Thursday, Jan. 8, 10:15 a.m. & 11:30 a.m. Healthy Kids at Miller Branch. Explore simple health concepts inspired by children’s literature. Ages 3-5 with adult; 45 min. Multi-week series. Well & Wise event. Limited space; tickets available at Children’s Desk 15 minutes before class. Ticket Required.

Thursday, Jan. 8, 7:00 p.m. Cutting Edge Discoveries in Neuroscience to Boost Your Brain (Part 3) at Miller Branch. As this three-part series continues, Majid Fotuhi, M.D., Ph.D., teaches how to boost brain capacity at any age. The founder and chief medical officer of NeurExpand, Fotuhi has written three books about brain health: Boost Your Brain: The New Art and Science Behind Enhanced Brain Performance; The Memory Cure; and The New York Times Crosswords to Keep Your Brain Young: The 6-Step Age-Defying Program. Fotuhi received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School and his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His research findings have been published in The Journal of Neuroscience, The Lancet, Nature, Neurology, Neuron, and The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Fotuhi has been featured on PBS, The Dr. Oz Show, CNN, Discovery Channel, NBC’s TODAY show, and numerous other national media.Registration is required. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.


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‘Tis the season to feed our friends, families, co-workers, and strangers. Across all cultures, food holds the center of our celebrations. The holiday potluck is one of my favorite ways to share cooking and culture. I have sampled wonderful foods from many lands, and heard wonderful stories that begin “My Grandmother always….” Thank you to the wonderful picture book creators who share their talents and their food stories with us.

bee-bim bopWhat could be more festive than cooking dinner with the family? Bee-bim Bop! (the name translates as “mix-mix rice”) is a traditional Korean dish of rice topped and then, mixed with meat and vegetables. A hungry child helps her mother make bee-bim bop: shopping, preparing ingredients, setting the table, and finally sitting down with her family to enjoy a favorite meal. The energy and enthusiasm of the young child are conveyed in the whimsical illustrations, which bring details from the Korean artist’s childhood to his depiction of a modern Korean American family. Even young readers who aren’t familiar with the dish will recognize the pride that comes from helping Mama, the fun of mixing ingredients together in a bowl, and the pleasure of sharing delicious food.

For those who have not sampled this delicious treat, there are so many great Korean restaurants here in Howard County. Get out, meet your neighbors, share a food and a culture.

feat for 10One of my favorite read-alouds, Cathryn Falwell’s counting book Feast for 10, takes us with an African-American mother and her children as they shop for and prepare a festive family dinner. At the supermarket, the count begins with one grocery cart and ends with ten hands helping to load the car. Back at home, the father joins in the preparations and the numbers build a second time to “ten hungry folks” seated around a table ready to share a tasty meal. The expressive collage work exudes family and warmth; even the page numbers are made from cozy fabric prints. Deceptively simple, Feast for 10 shows, rather than tells, the story that shared food is shared love.

Another great read-aloud, and a classroom staple, Derek Munson’s Enemy Pie is the hysterical story of very smart Dad and a really good pie.enemy pie

What should have been a perfect summer is ruined when Jeremy Ross moves in and becomes number one on the narrator’s enemy list. Fortunately, his father has a secret recipe for a pie that is guaranteed to help get rid of enemies. While Dad works on the pie, he explains his son’s role in the plan: “-you need to spend a day with your enemy. Even worse, you have to be nice to him.” It sounds tough, but the boy decides to give it a try. Predictably, between throwing water balloons, playing basketball, and hiding out in the tree house, he decides that Jeremy is not so bad after all. There’s still the problem of the pie, however. When his father serves up the pie, he decides to warn Jeremy that it is “poisonous or something.” However, it seems that both his father and his new friend are just fine, and what’s more, the pie is delicious.

If you are looking for ways to share food and culture, you can’t go wrong with Norah Dooley’s books: Everybody Cooks Rice, Everybody Bakes Bread, Everybody Serves Soup, and Everybody Brings Noodles all share in celebrating our diversity.

everybody cooks riceeverybody bakes breadeverybody serves soupeverybody brings noodles

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Happy New Year. Spend a day with your enemy and be nice to him.

Shirley ONeill works for Howard County Library System as the Children’s and Teen Materials Specialist. She cannot believe she actually gets paid to do this job.

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success through stillness meditationI have always been a person who appreciates the idea of meditation and its benefits more than the act itself. Having many friends who practice meditation, I have heard it all: “You should really try meditation.” (or the more direct) “You NEED to meditate!” That turned me off (somewhat) from the whole practice. I feel like meditation is a spiritual and calming journey that one must come to on their own terms. While I appreciate others wanting to offer their insight, I couldn’t force myself to be someone who meditates on a regular basis.

Don’t get me wrong, I have had pleasant experiences with meditation. For example, I participated in a guided meditation in one of my college classes and found it to be very enjoyable. The instructor had the entire class close their eyes and simply focus on the words she was speaking. After being lead across an open field until we saw a forest in front of us, we discovered our spirit animals. Mine is an owl. This form of meditation was very successful for me because I had someone telling me what to focus on. I have always felt as if I wasn’t meditating the right way because my thoughts would be scattered and unorganized. I’d jump from one thing to the next and couldn’t “turn my mind off.” However, this isn’t necessarily the goal of meditation. It is perfectly all right to acknowledge all thoughts as they surface as long as you don’t get caught up on them and lose focus.

art of stillnessI recently completed a meditation course through Gale Courses. These free courses can be accessed through the research section of Howard County Library System’s website. Just enter your library card number and you can access a variety of subjects. This course in particular explored the origin of meditation, the health benefits, as well as various techniques. Mindfulness meditation was especially interesting to me. It involves focusing on your breath or bodily sensations, acknowledging distracting thoughts in a non-judgmental manner, and then returning to the present moment. After completing the entire lesson on mindfulness meditation, I was familiar with the seven key factors of the practice. They include: Non-judging, Patience, Beginner’s mind, Trust, Non-striving, Acceptance, and Letting go. As a whole, mindfulness meditation is about being in the now. You are to release the need to judge or change thoughts and not get caught up on the past or future. You are to be open and accepting about what occurs during meditation and trust your awareness. In addition, you have to be able to “just be” and realize in that particular moment there is nowhere else for you to be and nothing to be attained. You are then able to allow things to naturally unfold and “let go” of expectations. I was drawn to this technique because it’s basically saying that you are allowed to acknowledge thoughts as they arise as long as you don’t let them consume you. It encourages the one meditating to place their focus where it needs to be; in the present moment.

Practicing mindfulness is something I try to do in everyday life. I take note of the colorful leaves on the trees and each foot step as I walk up to my apartment building. I keep a non-judging attitude in daily interactions and stay aware of my moment-to-moment experiences. Learning about the various ways to meditate has allowed me to find a technique that will work for me. I am looking forward to mindfulness meditation becoming a part of my regular routine and seeing all the ways that it enhances my life and well-being.

Laci Radford is an Instructor & Research Specialist at the Savage Branch and STEM Education Center. She is a music lover, writer, and an avid reader. She enjoys attending concerts, plays, and other forms of live entertainment. Her favorite activities include scoping out unique items at thrift stores, bonfires with friends, and having tie-dye parties. She is studying Psychology and plans to become a music and art therapist sooner rather than later.

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Through Jan. 4, 2015 Symphony of Lights, a 20-minute drive through more than 70 larger-than-life holiday light displays, benefiting Howard County General Hospital, is open nightly from 6 to 10 p.m. through Jan. 4, 2015 (closed on Tuesdays and Dec. 31). The display, presented by Macy’s, is in Columbia’s Symphony Woods. Admission is $20 per car or van up to eight. $5 off coupon.

Wednesday, Dec.31, 5-8 p.m. Midnight at 7 at Columbia’s Symphony of Lights is a New Year’s Eve celebration for families with fireworks at 7 p.m. (weather permitting). The event includes a walk through holiday light displays, music, entertainment and giveaways. Proceeds benefit Howard County General Hospital.

Monday, Jan. 5, 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Glenwood Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

Tuesday, Jan. 6, 7:00 p.m. Guided Meditation at Miller Branch. Enjoy a guided mindfulness meditation designed to impart a feeling of peacefulness and connection. Please bring a cushion or meditation pillow. Presented by Star Ferguson, M.Ac., L.Ac. Registration is required. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

Thursday, Jan. 8, 10:15 a.m. & 11:30 a.m. Healthy Kids at Miller Branch. Explore simple health concepts inspired by children’s literature. Ages 3-5 with adult; 45 min. Multi-week series. Well & Wise event. Limited space; tickets available at Children’s Desk 15 minutes before class. Ticket Required.

Thursday, Jan. 8, 7:00 p.m. Cutting Edge Discoveries in Neuroscience to Boost Your Brain (Part 3) at Miller Branch. As this three-part series continues, Majid Fotuhi, M.D., Ph.D., teaches how to boost brain capacity at any age. The founder and chief medical officer of NeurExpand, Fotuhi has written three books about brain health: Boost Your Brain: The New Art and Science Behind Enhanced Brain Performance; The Memory Cure; and The New York Times Crosswords to Keep Your Brain Young: The 6-Step Age-Defying Program. Fotuhi received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School and his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His research findings have been published in The Journal of Neuroscience, The Lancet, Nature, Neurology, Neuron, and The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Fotuhi has been featured on PBS, The Dr. Oz Show, CNN, Discovery Channel, NBC’s TODAY show, and numerous other national media.Registration is required. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.


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Photo by David Fournier with Thanks to The Magic Hour FoundationWinter is a time when the days get shorter, the nights get longer, and temperatures dip to their lowest. However, winter is also a time when some dealing with the “winter blues,” and are overcome with tell-tale signs of depression– a medical condition that affects a person’s thoughts and feelings as well as the body, and can be associated with various physical problems in areas such as sleep, appetite, energy, libido, and thinking (Albrecht/Herrick16). The feelings and sensations, or lack thereof, associated with depression may be experienced by a person for any number of reasons specific to the individual and their circumstances. However, depression, which occurs regularly during certain times of the year, and which most typically affects people during the cold, dark, months of winter, is known as Seasonal Affective Disorder or SAD.

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness or NAMI, “the classic characteristics of recurrent winter depression include oversleeping, daytime fatigue, carbohydrate craving and weight gain. Additionally, many people may experience other features of depression including decreased sexual interest, lethargy, hopelessness, suicidal thoughts, lack of interest in normal activities and decreased socialization.” One might ask why is it that a person becomes more prone to these feelings of depression during winter versus other times of the year. While the onset of SAD symptoms “usually begin in October or November and subside in March or April, in a minority of cases, symptoms occur in the summer rather than winter. There are certain factors (circadian rhythm, serotonin levels, and melatonin levels) that have been identified as influencing the occurrence of SAD and its symptoms, but a specific cause has not yet been identified.

sadIn order to better understand how SAD affects individuals, let’s take a closer look at the three influential factors mentioned above: circadian rhythm, serotonin levels, and melatonin levels. Exposure to decreased light may disrupt the body’s internal clock, or circadian rhythm, which helps us time our wake and sleep cycles, and determines when various important biological processes (ex: sleep, appetite, digestion, etc.) will take place. For instance, most of us are acclimated to how the presence or absence of sunlight influences when we wake up (in the morning), when we are at our most productive (during the day), and when we go to bed (in the evening after the sun has set).

Serotonin, aka “happiness hormone,” is a monoamine neurotransmitter biochemically derived from tryptophan, which regulates intestinal movements, as well as mood, appetite, sleep, and muscle contraction. The less light there is, the lower the production of serotonin, which disrupts the way the neurotransmitter effectively communicates with nerve cells, and leads to symptoms of SAD.

Melatonin is a hormone produced by the pineal gland when it is dark, in order to make us feel sleepy. On the other hand, when there is light, the hypothalamus inhibits production of this hormone, which causes us to feel awake.

In conclusion, the darker days of winter cause the circadian rhythm to be affected by the lowered levels of serotonin, as well as the increased levels of melatonin. The body responds as if it were in pseudo-hibernation mode, and the SAD sufferer feels sleepier, increasingly tired, has less energy, appetite decreases, and mood is dampened. In order to curb and combat the symptoms of SAD, there are effective forms of treatment available, which consist of antidepressants, light therapy, and psychotherapy.

If you or anyone you know may be experiencing SAD, talk with your health care provider, or a qualified professional. For more information regarding SAD, and/or available treatment options, the following local resources are just a phone call away: NAMI (410-884-8691); Howard County Mental Health Authority (410-313-7350); Thrive Center (410-740-3240); Congruent Counseling Services (410-740-8066).

When Jinelee De Souza isn’t channeling her inner super-heroine at Howard County Library System as an Instructor & Research Specialist, she’s doing so at the gym, during impromptu photoshoots with her bff, and everywhere in between.

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Comfort foodHave you ever told yourself, “Just one more potato chip,” and then proceeded to finish off the entire bag? Or have you bought a box of cookies with the intention of eating them in reasonable portions – and later, finding yourself stressed, eating the entire box in one sitting? I have and you are not alone.

It has been proven that women, more so then men, particularly stress about what and how much they eat. Why do we feel so guilty when we overeat? Personally, some of the reasons I find myself eating more to soothe feelings of anger, boredom, loneliness, and stress (and as a result, end up feeling guilty too). This is something I struggle with on a regular basis and it becomes a vicious cycle. Once I have overeaten for the day, I feel guilty and continue to overeat thinking, “What’s the point? I’ve already eaten poorly today.”

According to Lisa Elaine Held from an article that was published in Prevention magazine in May 2012, “Media messaging doesn’t help. Women’s magazine headlines are full of “guilt-free” burgers, snacks, and desserts. The underlying message is clear: If the foods in this article are guilt-free, then those others you’re eating are guilt-y.” So, how do we distinguish between eating as a source of nourishment and emotional eating?

10 day detoxAnother important question to consider is, “Are certain foods physically addictive?” According to The Blood Sugar Solution 10-day Detox Diet by Mark Hyman, MD, “Foods that spike blood sugar are biologically addictive. So yes, food addiction is very real. It’s the root cause why so many people are overweight and sick. They are stuck in a viscous cycle of cravings.” I know that once I’ve gotten a taste of something sweet, there’s no doubt in my mind that the phenomenon of craving is overpowering and hard to shake.

“For some people giving up certain foods proves as difficult as it may be for an addict to give up alcohol or drugs. The same components of addiction are present and the brain may be affected in the same way. For many people their relationship with food is comparable to that of a drug user’s with drugs,” states Kimberly Steele, who is a bariatric surgeon at The Johns Hopkins Center for Bariatric Surgery.

What can we do to separate food with emotions? Ask ourselves some honest questions. I think the best question to ask yourself is, “Am I physically hungry or am I trying to fill some emotional need with food?” What has worked for me, is maintaining a daily food diary. I’m honest in my reporting, even when I feel I have “messed up” that day with overeating or eating junk food. This helps me see just how food and my emotions are intertwined. I know that this may not work for everyone, but maybe we should cut ourselves a break and try to separate food and guilt.

Alex Hill is a Customer Service Specialist at the East Columbia Branch. She has worked for Howard County Library System in the Customer Service department for more than 5 years. Alex enjoys giving movie recommendations, talking to East Columbia’s teens and in her spare time, taking pictures.

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calendar_2014smMonday, Dec. 15, 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Glenwood Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

Wednesday, Dec. 17, 10:15 a.m. I’m Going to Be a Big Brother or Sister at Savage Branch. Prepare for the arrival of a baby in this class for new siblings. Enjoy stories, activities, and bring a favorite doll or stuffed animal to practice holding your baby. Resources for parents, too. Families; 30 – 45 min. Ticket required.In partnership with Howard County General Hospital: A Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. Limited space; tickets available at Children’s Desk 15 minutes before class.

Monday, Jan. 5, 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Glenwood Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

Tuesday, Jan. 6, 7:00 p.m. Guided Meditation at Miller Branch. Enjoy a guided mindfulness meditation designed to impart a feeling of peacefulness and connection. Please bring a cushion or meditation pillow. Presented by Star Ferguson, M.Ac., L.Ac. Registration is required. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

 


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Many thanks to Kelly Mack for her contributions to Well & Wise.

In my farewell reflections, I want to share my thanks for allowing me to tell some of my health stories and lessons learned. I view health as a journey, trying to find a good balance in our daily life. With this approach, taking a look back at the path can be very helpful for planning next steps.

In my case, I made some great steps in physical therapy and gaining strength following knee replacement surgery. While I still have additional goals, I have found regular exercise to be very beneficial in my recovery and overall health. On the more challenging side, my chronic rheumatoid arthritis (RA) provides more adventure than I would like. This year I went on a new medication, but the side effects of weakening my immune system have led to bronchitis, pneumonia, and similar issues.

For me, health is a tricky balance. I don’t often feel I have a handle on it, but try to approach health as a daily practice. When I can string together some healthy days, I feel encouraged. A few weeks and I get ecstatic. I’m never 100 percent, but I’m always working on my health.

For the coming year I have a good foundation to build on. I’m happy with my exercise practice and feel I’ve made great improvements to my eating habits with the help of a nutritionist. I plan on incorporating meditation to help manage stress and pain from my RA. Continuing to gain strength will always be an important goal while also trying to maintain (or even improve) my quality of life with RA.

More elusively, I need to find a better balance with my RA treatment’s side effects and the attack of the disease. Unfortunately, I don’t have a plan for this piece, but need to consult with my doctor and work step-by-step to find a way.

With this in mind, how would you assess your year in health? Made some improvements? Noted some setbacks? Can you pick out one or two new practices you can embrace every day to support your health? It may sound crazy, but I’ve found making a change to daily habits can build gradually over time and give the confidence that long term health goals are possible to achieve.

Best of luck in your assessment and hope you can stake out some wins in the New Year!

Kelly Mack lives in Washington, DC, and works for a marketing communications firm.

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As we approach the holiday season, many of us experience extra stress in our lives. Some of our stress is due to the hectic schedules that we endure, family situations, staying healthy and eating well, or traveling. So, what can you do to lessen your stress and enjoy the holidays this year?

For stressful family situations, I recommend Happier at Home by Gretchen Rubin and A is for Attitude by Patricia Russell-McCloud.

happier home a is for attitude

If staying fit and eating well are bothering you, check out: Breaking the Food Seduction by Dr. Neal Barnard, 50 Ways to Soothe Yourself Without Food by Susan Albers, Psy.D., Crave by Cynthia M. Bulik, Ph.D., and Eating Well for Optimum Health: The Essential Guide to Food, Diet, and Nutrition.

breaking food seduction50 ways to soothe yourself without foodcraveeating well for optimum health

 

 

 

 

 

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If travel is a concern (or while you’re waiting at the airport), try some of our new services at hclibrary.org. Zinio is great for reading magazines, while Hoopla has music, audiobooks, television, and movies available. What a stress-free way to enjoy those long hours at the airport or while riding in a car! I love getting my favorite magazine through Zinio to read on my tablet.

Lastly, try journaling. Journaling is a wonderful way to relieve stress. I keep a gratitude journal beside my bed. Every night, I write five things in my journal that I am grateful for that day. I found that it helps me to sleep better at night, reduces my stress while making me more gracious for many of life’s blessings that I experience every day.

Remember, enjoy the upcoming season while building those memories to cherish with friends, family, and loved ones. Until we meet again, happy trails!

Anna Louise Downing is a Customer Service Specialist at the Miller Branch. She is an avid reader and enjoys Disney, music and her passion for running. She has been a race ambassador for several local races, is a Sweat Pink Ambassador for promoting women’s health. Follow her journey towards being physically fit with running and healthy lifestyle choices here on Well & Wise.

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calendar_2014smMonday, Dec. 8, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Savage Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. 2nd Mondays. No registration required.

Monday, Dec. 8, 6-10 p.m. Military Appreciation Night at Howard County General Hospital’s Symphony of Lights, a 20-minute drive through more than 70 larger-than-life holiday light displays in Columbia’s Symphony Woods, benefiting the hospital. Show military ID for $10 off regular admission cost.

Monday, Dec. 8, 7:00 p.m. Cutting Edge Discoveries in Neuroscience to Boost Your Brain (Part 2) at Miller Branch. As this three-part series continues, Majid Fotuhi, M.D., Ph.D., teaches how to boost brain capacity at any age. The founder and chief medical officer of NeurExpand, Fotuhi has written three books about brain health: Boost Your Brain: The New Art and Science Behind Enhanced Brain Performance; The Memory Cure; and The New York Times Crosswords to Keep Your Brain Young: The 6-Step Age-Defying Program. Fotuhi received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School and his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His research findings have been published in The Journal of Neuroscience, The Lancet, Nature, Neurology, Neuron, and The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Fotuhi has been featured on PBS, The Dr. Oz Show, CNN, Discovery Channel, NBC’s TODAY show, and numerous other national media. Registration Required.

Tuesday, Dec. 9, 10:30 a.m. I’m Going to Be a Big Brother or Sister at Glenwood Branch. Prepare for the arrival of a baby in this class for new siblings. Enjoy stories, activities, and bring a favorite doll or stuffed animal to practice holding your baby. Resources for parents, too. Families; 30 – 45 min. In partnership with Howard County General Hospital: A Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. Registration is required. Register online or by calling 410.313.5579.

Tuesday, Dec. 9, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Elkridge Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

Tuesday, Dec. 9, 4:15-6:15 p.m. Twinkling Tots is a walk through Columbia’s Symphony of Lights for families with young children. Experience the 1.4 mile lighted path of more than 70 larger-than-life holiday light displays at this event that benefits Howard County General Hospital. Children in strollers and wagons are welcome.

Wednesday, Dec. 10, 10 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Free Medicare 101 presentation to review Original Medicare (Part A Hospital and Part B Medical) and Prescription Drug Coverage (Part D). Learn what is covered, your costs, how Medicare works and available benefit programs in Howard County General Hospital’s Wellness Center. Register here. A Medicare 102 session is available on Dec. 17.

Thursday, Dec. 11, 5:30-9 p.m. $55 Adult, Child and Infant CPR/AED will teach you the skills needed to clear an airway obstruction, perform CPR and how to use an AED. At the successful completion of this course, you will earn a two-year American Heart Association completion card. Located in the Howard County General Hospital Wellness Center.

Monday, Dec. 15, 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Glenwood Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

Monday, Dec. 15, 4-5:45 p.m. Due to inclement weather, Bike the Lights in Columbia’s Symphony of Lights has been rescheduled for Dec. 15. Experience the lighted path of these larger-than-life holiday displays on two wheels at this Howard County General Hospital benefit event. Bikers of all ages and abilities welcome; non-bikers may walk with bikers through the 1.4 mile course. You can also take a 20-minute drive through the lights nightly from 6 to 10 p.m. through Jan. 4, 2015 (closed for walk-through events on Tuesdays and Dec. 31). Drive-through Admission is $20 per car or van up to eight. $5 off coupon.

Wednesday, Dec. 17, 10:15 a.m. I’m Going to Be a Big Brother or Sister at Savage Branch. Prepare for the arrival of a baby in this class for new siblings. Enjoy stories, activities, and bring a favorite doll or stuffed animal to practice holding your baby. Resources for parents, too. Families; 30 – 45 min. Ticket required.In partnership with Howard County General Hospital: A Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. Limited space; tickets available at Children’s Desk 15 minutes before class.


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It’s upon us again – the resplendence and clamor of the holiday season.

Panic (admit it), set in back in October when Target brought out their windfall of mini lights. And then, there are those lavender Uggs – size 6 – you simply cannot find. The ones (if you don’t get them for her) your fourteen-year-old will remember her whole adult life. Football and menfolk will soon have squatter’s rights to the big screen in the living room. You’ll endure ear-deafening touchdowns, Velveeta on the new down pillows, and some nimrod always gives the dog the last of the chili with beans. From the kitchen you stare darkly at the remains of Aunt Celeste’s Waldorf Salad. Aunt Celeste, who’s now decided to stay through New Year’s. We won’t discuss the bathroom scale.

“Your brain,” says Scientific American, “is telling you to STOP! It’s full. It needs some downtime.”
But how to retreat from the holiday madness?
It’s as simple as black and white… the creature comfort of a feel-good book.
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  • Lottery by Patricia Wood
    Lottery by Patricia Wood -- Perry L. Crandall (L. is for “Lucky”) is a mildly retarded young optimist who, as the sudden winner of the twelve million dollar Washington State Lottery, is just as suddenly everyone’s best friend!
Aimee Zuccarini is an Instructor & Research Specialist at the East Columbia Branch. She facilitates several book discussions and writes the book reviews for The Maryland Women’s Journal.

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desktopAre you, like me, still recovering from the overeating, carbfest known as Thanksgiving? Rich mashed potatoes, candied veggies (only on Thanksgiving can we justify candying our vegetables) buttery rolls, whipped cream on a slice of pie… (sorry, lost myself there for a moment). After that kind of meal, the last thing on your mind is probably dairy, but let me throw an unlikely word (composed of two dreaded words) out there: Buttermilk.

Despite its name, buttermilk (traditionally, the liquid left after churning milk to butter) has fewer calories than whole milk (99 calories in a cup to whole milk’s 157) and less fat (2.2 grams vs. 9 grams per cup). So, buttermilk is generally better for you than regular milk, having just as much calcium and being more easily digestible. Buttermilk is also believed to aid in overall digestion. This is mainly attributed to the fact that it is an excellent source of probiotics. If you’ve heard “probiotic” tossed around quite a bit but were never really quite sure what it referred to, MedlinePlus explains that it’s a “preparation (as a dietary supplement) containing live bacteria (as lactobacilli) that is taken orally to restore beneficial bacteria to the body; also: a bacterium in such a preparation.” And, for those of you keeping track, probiotics are my new best friends since my run-in with C. Diff last year.

Buttermilk has things besides just probiotics going for it. As mentioned, it still has plenty of calcium (284 milligrams per cup). There’s also phosphorus, riboflavin, and potassium in there. And for those of you looking to boost energy, there’s 8 grams of protein and 12 grams of carbohydrates in one cup of buttermilk. It has also been suggested that buttermilk consumption might be associated with reduced cholesterol. Buttermilk is also believed to be helpful against dehydration, boost immunity, and benefit skin.

hungry girl 300 under 300 breakfast lunch dinnerButtermilk frequently comes up as a replacement for richer dairy products in heart-healthy recipes. That doesn’t mean it still doesn’t have a dark side. It pops up in such deliciously naughty books as Fried & True: More Than 50 recipes for America’s Best Fried Chicken & Sides (although I make a pretty tasty oven-fried chicken with buttermilk that I got from Mark Bittman’s How to Cook Everything) and a lovely and tempting book simply called Buttermilk: A Savor the South Cookbook. But, to defend buttermilk’s newly won reputation, it also features in books such as Hungry Girl 300 Under 300: 300 Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Recipes Under 300 Calories and Deliciously G-Free: Food so Flavorful They’ll Never Believe It’s Gluten Free. So, unless you are dairy-free, you may want to give the deceptively named buttermilk a second look.

Joanne Sobieck-Lingg is glad to blog about her many, disparate interests (though expert in none, except maybe parenthetical asides). In past lives, she was a writer, proofreader, editor, project manager, teacher, and even co-coordinator of a certain health blog. She has been happily ensconced among the fiction and teen books at the Central Branch of HCLS since 2003.

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calendar_2014smMonday, Dec. 1, 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Glenwood Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

Monday, Dec. 1, 7:00 p.m. Calming Crafts at Miller Branch. Research shows that creative activities can boost serotonin levels. Join us as we use artistic expression to improve our moods. All levels of artistic ability welcome. Registration is required. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

Bike the Lights in Columbia’s Symphony Woods on Tuesday, Dec. 2, 4:15-6:15 p.m. Experience the lighted path of 70 larger-than-life holiday light displays on two wheels at Howard County General Hospital’s Symphony of Lights. Bikers of all ages and abilities welcome; non-bikers may walk with bikers through the 1.4 mile course. You can also take a 20-minute drive through the lights nightly from 6 to 10 p.m. through Jan. 4, 2015 (closed for walk-through events on Tuesdays and Dec. 31). Drive-through Admission is $20 per car or van up to eight. $5 off coupon.

Monday, Dec. 8, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Savage Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. 2nd Mondays. No registration required.

Monday, Dec. 8, 7:00 p.m. Cutting Edge Discoveries in Neuroscience to Boost Your Brain (Part 2) at Miller Branch. As this three-part series continues, Majid Fotuhi, M.D., Ph.D., teaches how to boost brain capacity at any age. The founder and chief medical officer of NeurExpand, Fotuhi has written three books about brain health: Boost Your Brain: The New Art and Science Behind Enhanced Brain Performance; The Memory Cure; and The New York Times Crosswords to Keep Your Brain Young: The 6-Step Age-Defying Program. Fotuhi received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School and his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His research findings have been published in The Journal of Neuroscience, The Lancet, Nature, Neurology, Neuron, and The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Fotuhi has been featured on PBS, The Dr. Oz Show, CNN, Discovery Channel, NBC’s TODAY show, and numerous other national media. Registration Required.

Tuesday, Dec. 9, 10:30 a.m. I’m Going to Be a Big Brother or Sister at Glenwood Branch. Prepare for the arrival of a baby in this class for new siblings. Enjoy stories, activities, and bring a favorite doll or stuffed animal to practice holding your baby. Resources for parents, too. Families; 30 – 45 min. In partnership with Howard County General Hospital: A Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. Registration is required. Register online or by calling 410.313.5579.

Tuesday, Dec. 9, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Elkridge Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

 


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each kindnessWe don’t all come out the box as kind, compassionate little Buddhas. It can be a tough road, instilling character traits such as empathy and forgiveness. Thank you to the wonderful picture book authors who are able bring these concepts to children in a discussable and enjoyable format, and to the artist/illustrators who make these books a joy to share with both the children and adults in our lives

Jacqueline Woodson and E.B. White’s collaborative reflection on kindness and missed opportunities is both harsh and beautiful. New girl to the school, Maya, tried very hard to make friends with the girls in her class. Chloe and her friends wanted nothing to do with the ragged, poor girl, deliberately leaving her out. The teacher leads an exercise in kindness, throwing a pebble in a bowl of water and watching the ripples move out, asking the class to recount acts of kindness they have shown. Chloe’s realization that she has never been kind to Maya is coupled with Maya’s never returning to the school, having moved away. Chloe’s sorrow and remorse are real, as is the feeling that Chloe has learned a valuable lesson.

Income disparity is even more apparent in this season of giving. What a great message, reminding us to seize the opportunity in front of us to be a little kinder.

forgiveness gardenBased on the Garden of Forgiveness that was built in Beirut after the Lebanese Civil War that ended in 1990, two fictional villages are separated by a stream and years of argument. Using the Sanskrit words for Us and Them as village names, Lauren Thompson tells of a child who throws a stone, and a child who chooses not to throw it back. Instead they build a Forgiveness Garden, between the two villages. It is not an easy task, and Thompson does not make light of how hard it is to forgive. When the garden is complete, Sama and Karune sit together and talk. “What do you think they said?” asks the author.

There is no better gift than that of forgiveness. It enriches both the recipient and the giver. You never even have to tell the person you have forgiven them; it will still powerfully impact both of your lives for the better.

invisible boyWith all the kids who “take up a lot of space,” it is easy to see how quiet Brian can be overlooked in the classroom, on the playground, and in the lunch room. Drawn in grey tones, when everything else is in color, Brian’s “invisibility” and exclusion are apparent to the youngest reader. When a new boy, Justin, is made fun of for eating bulgogi, Brian slips an illustrated note to make him feel better. Justin sees the wonderful comics and cartoons that Brian has been drawing. The more Brian is “seen,” the more color is added, until others notice Brian’s talents and he becomes full color. This Black Eyed Susan picture book nominee for 2014-2015 provides a lesson in how one person can make a difference in the life of another by giving them the precious gift of time and attention. The back matter, containing discussion questions and a well chosen reading list, make this the complete package for teaching empathy.

Supertramp was right all those years ago: “Give a Little Bit…send a smile and show you care.”

Shirley ONeill works for Howard County Library System as the Children’s and Teen Materials Specialist. She cannot believe she actually gets paid to do this job.

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One of the ironic things about becoming sick and living with a chronic illness is that you increasingly appreciate good health and feeling well. Although I have lived with rheumatoid arthritis since I was a small child, I still admire wellness in others.

For example, I have difficulty walking and yet enjoy watching others—how easy it looks in comparison to the gait I practice with great effort and thoughtful concentration. It amazes me just not only how people can walk without thinking about it, but that they can run. To me, running is akin to flying—an amazing feat.

Maybe my favorite healthy person to watch is a toddler. They have such beautifully healthy and flexible joints! I love how they can tumble and play—moving without an ounce of effort and filled with energy. Living with a joint disease has led me to appreciate bones that are not painful, that are flexible and healthy.

When I had my knee removed, all I wanted was a good, functioning knee. When I had my new knee replacement, I wanted strength and to be able to lift my leg on my own power. Gradually I got there, but it was keeping that goal of better health in my mind that helped me to achieve it. Sometimes seeing good health and knowing what it is to you can be an inspiration for a goal. Other times it is something you can appreciate and admire.

I know that I will not be cured of my rheumatoid arthritis and return to perfect health. I live with an ongoing condition that can also cause other issues. However, I appreciate the relative health I do have. No matter how bad we’re feeling, I think it’s possible to find a bright side—like a steady heartbeat, breath of fresh air, or the feeling of sun on our skin.

Appreciating good health, means being glad of it for others and counting our blessings even during an illness.

Kelly Mack lives in Washington, DC, and works for a marketing communications firm.

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Symphony of Lights, a 20-minute drive through of more than 70 larger-than-life holiday light displays, benefiting Howard County General Hospital, is now open nightly from 6 to 10 p.m. through Jan. 4, 2015 (closed for walk-through events on Tuesdays and Dec. 31). The display, presented by Macy’s, is in Columbia’s Symphony Woods. Admission is $20 per car or van up to eight. $5 off coupon. You can also participate in a Group Walk-Through. They’re perfect for scouts, school groups and more (Tuesdays through Dec. 30, pre-registration required, pets prohibited).

Monday, Dec. 1, 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Glenwood Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

Monday, Dec. 1, 7:00 p.m. Calming Crafts at Miller Branch. Research shows that creative activities can boost serotonin levels. Join us as we use artistic expression to improve our moods. All levels of artistic ability welcome. Registration is required. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

Monday, Dec. 8, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Savage Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. 2nd Mondays. No registration required.

Monday, Dec. 8, 7:00 p.m. Cutting Edge Discoveries in Neuroscience to Boost Your Brain (Part 2) at Miller Branch. As this three-part series continues, Majid Fotuhi, M.D., Ph.D., teaches how to boost brain capacity at any age. The founder and chief medical officer of NeurExpand, Fotuhi has written three books about brain health: Boost Your Brain: The New Art and Science Behind Enhanced Brain Performance; The Memory Cure; and The New York Times Crosswords to Keep Your Brain Young: The 6-Step Age-Defying Program. Fotuhi received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School and his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His research findings have been published in The Journal of Neuroscience, The Lancet, Nature, Neurology, Neuron, and The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Fotuhi has been featured on PBS, The Dr. Oz Show, CNN, Discovery Channel, NBC’s TODAY show, and numerous other national media. Registration Required.

 


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fotor_(48)Now that I am surrounded by folks with fall colds, and woke up this morning congested, it’s time to address a critical question. Is blowing my nose advisable or not? Will blowing my nose relieve the stuffy feeling? Will it shorten the length of my symptoms?

A 1999 study at the University of Virginia used four healthy human subjects to measure the pressures generated by nose blowing. Nose blowing generated over ten times as much intranasal pressure as coughing and sneezing did. CT scanning was then used to see if nose blowing, coughing or sneezing caused contrast medium to be pushed into the paranasal sinuses. Only nose blowing resulted in contrast movement. In two of the subjects, some contrast had moved into the maxillary and frontal sinuses after the subjects had blown their noses.

Does this mean that nose blowing increases the risk for a cold progressing to a sinus infection? Are the viruses or bacteria in the nose being propelled into the paranasal sinuses? Given the small scale of this research, there would need to be more studies to answer the question definitively. The preliminary conclusion that the pressure generated by nose blowing can increase the risk of furthering an infection makes logical sense, however.

Health care providers recommend that nose blowing only be done gently. If you feel your ears popping, you are definitely using too much force. Holding one nostril closed while blowing out the other nostril helps to control the pressure. Blowing through one nostril at a time also assists in assuring that both sides are somewhat cleared. Another good way to lower the pressure is to keep your mouth open while blowing your nose.

Wiping your nose or using saline nasal rinses may be less traumatic to your nasal passages than blowing your nose. These more gentle measures could possibly decrease the risk of pushing the infection into the sinuses. Inhaling steam or taking decongestant medication can help thin the secretions and ease the drainage of the congestion. Of note, much of the feeling of congestion is due to swollen membranes and dilated blood vessels rather than actual mucus. For this reason, blowing your nose may not even relieve the stuffy feeling.

Finally, if you’ve decided to blow your nose, wash your hands when you’re done. Try to avoid touching your face throughout the day. It is easy to spread the cold to others if you then touch something like a shared keyboard or door handle.

Cherise Tasker is an Instructor & Research Specialist at the Central Branch and has a background in health information. Most evenings, Cherise can be found reading a book, attending a book club meeting, or coordinating a book group.

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animal madnessShe called him “beast.”

He was a noble Bernese Mountain Dog, and next to her new husband, the love of Laurel Braitman’s life.

But after only a few months, the big dog she named Oliver, began to exhibit a series of profound behaviors: snapping at invisible flies, licking his paws into sodden masses, and eventually jumping out a third-story window – his unknown demons chasing close behind.

Serious medication and intense intervention were stepped up, but in the end Oliver succumbed to both emotional and physical trauma. Braitman, unlike her husband, was inconsolable, and soon his curious lack of empathy signaled a tipping point in the marriage.

Alone, Braitman now sought serious closure and catharsis: What exactly did Oliver feel or perceive that impaired his ability to function normally? And why the heck was it so eerily close to what humans feel? Braitman, a doctor of medical history, began to buttonhole the experts – animal psychologists, ethologists — even an animal trainer or two. Do we share an underlying brain structure that not only “exists across animal species,” but can similarly malfunction when an emotional state is compromised? More importantly, can understanding animal behavior benefit our own – even if we don’t speak the same language? The answers, Braitman found, were in the nine phyla of the animal kingdom.

From the adrenaline-charged cervidae for example. When pursued by predators, deer experience a blood-pressure spike not dissimilar to the white-coat hypertension I know I feel in a doctor’s office.

To the laws of attraction: Who knew bees were as picky about the flowers they pollinate as humans browsing online dating profiles? And then there are the giggling rats, the embarrassed octopus, and the bullied bonobo with PTSD. What, you might ask, was 17th century philosopher, Rene Descartes thinking when he arrogantly pronounced all beasts as “nothing more than automatons”?

Generous and engaging, Animal Madness: How Anxious Dogs, Compulsive Parrots, and Elephants in Recovery Help Us Understand Ourselves will have readers looking in the mirror more than once.

Curious George would give this one two opposable thumbs up.

Aimee Zuccarini is an Instructor & Research Specialist at the East Columbia Branch. She facilitates several book discussions and writes the book reviews for The Maryland Women’s Journal.


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Symphony of Lights, a 20-minute drive through more than 70 larger-than-life holiday light displays, benefiting Howard County General Hospital, opens nightly from 6 to 10 p.m. Nov. 17 through Jan. 4, 2015 (closed on Tuesdays and Dec. 31). The display, presented by Macy’s, is in Columbia’s Symphony Woods. Admission is $20 per car or van up to eight.  $5 off couponDazzle Dash kicks off Symphony of Lights with a run/walk through the lights as well as activities, food, music, entertainment and giveaways this weekend: Nov. 15.

Monday, Nov. 17, 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Glenwood Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

Thursday, Nov. 20, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Great American Smokeout  in the Howard County General Hospital lobby: includes information and literature to help you stop smoking. Free event.

Monday, Dec. 1, 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Glenwood Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

Monday, Dec. 1, 7:00 p.m. Calming Crafts at Miller Branch. Research shows that creative activities can boost serotonin levels. Join us as we use artistic expression to improve our moods. All levels of artistic ability welcome. Registration is required. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950

Monday, Dec. 8, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Savage Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. 2nd Mondays. No registration required.

Monday, Dec. 8, 7:00 p.m. Cutting Edge Discoveries in Neuroscience to Boost Your Brain (Part 2) at Miller Branch. As this three-part series continues, Majid Fotuhi, M.D., Ph.D., teaches how to boost brain capacity at any age. The founder and chief medical officer of NeurExpand, Fotuhi has written three books about brain health: Boost Your Brain: The New Art and Science Behind Enhanced Brain Performance; The Memory Cure; and The New York Times Crosswords to Keep Your Brain Young: The 6-Step Age-Defying Program. Fotuhi received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School and his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His research findings have been published in The Journal of Neuroscience, The Lancet, Nature, Neurology, Neuron, and The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Fotuhi has been featured on PBS, The Dr. Oz Show, CNN, Discovery Channel, NBC’s TODAY show, and numerous other national media. Registration Required.


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blueberry muffinsI love breakfast. Sundays are really the only morning my vegan husband and I can prepare and enjoy a long, lazy breakfast together. As the non-vegan, I have two strict rules of our vegan breakfast: it must be tasty, and it must not be recognizably vegan.

Most of the books I check out from the library are cookbooks. I like to flip through them and find recipes that we can both enjoy. Usually, I’ll need to convert baking recipes to a vegan format. Replace eggs with Ener-G. Substitute soy milk for regular milk. Create my own vegan buttermilk with soy milk and vinegar.

flour tooMy friend and colleague, Debbie, brought to my attention the cookbook Flour, Too by Joanne Chang. Ms. Chang is an accomplished pastry chef and owner of Flour Bakery in Boston, MA. She has quite of a number of recipes that are vegan, but not labeled as such. One recipe labeled as vegan, the Vegan Vanilla Mixed Berry Muffin comes with a short personalized story about how this muffin was created to serve her vegan customers- and that it has many fans who are not vegan. The beautiful photograph of the muffins in their tarnished silver muffin tin is gorgeous. Now, I love vanilla. (I even tried it plain once, straight out of the bottle, because I loved it so much. I never did that again.) I love blueberries. I love raspberries. Although my own garden grown blueberries and raspberries were exhausted (I wish I had found this book earlier in the summer when they were abundant), I knew this was one recipe that I had to share.

“Honey? Let’s go to the grocery store. I need to get some fresh blueberries and raspberries.”

Now, I did forget to add a few things to the recipe. I forgot to add salt, and I didn’t add the sprinkling of sugar on top of the muffin.

My hubby really liked the muffins. I added a few extra berri es to the batter because I love berries and because I thought the recipe could have used more berries. Next time, I think I’ll just plop extra berries on the top of the muffins. These muffins were not dense at all, but rather on the light side (probably because of the mixture of the vinegar and the baking soda).

The next time I’m in Boston, I’ll be heading to Joanne Chang’s Flour Bakery and possibly enroll in one of her baking classes.

Oh, I’m almost forgot! I had some leftover blueberries and raspberries (even after using more than called for in this recipe) and made myself a chocolate raspberry sandwich.
I still don’t know what I’m going to do with the leftover blueberries.

Anyhow, here’s how you can make your own chocolate raspberry sandwich snack:
Cut the raspberries in half so they’re flattened. Spread vegan bread with vegan chocolate spread. I used Dark Choco Dream spread because it’s vegan.
Place flattened raspberries on top of the chocolate spread and finish with another plain slice of vegan bread. Yum!

Mio Higashimoto is an Instructor & Research Specialist at the East Columbia Branch. She has a background in history and spends much of her spare time knitting, reading, hiking, and watching Star Trek reruns.

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Howard County Library System has so many good books on all kinds of subjects; I was sure that I would find lots of help researching how to eat for good health. Sure enough, the cookbook shelves are full of wonderful new books on how to cook healthful foods for all kinds of conditions.

Diabetes is the elephant in the middle of the room as far as special diets are concerned. If you need to cook for a person with diabetes you will find many trustworthy sources. The Healthy Carb Diabetes Cookbook (2008) by chef Jennifer Bucko and nurse Lara Rondinelli, is published by the American Diabetes Association. It teaches what constitutes healthy complex carbohydrates and promises “favorite foods to fit your meal plan.”

Another helpful book is Diabetes Meal Planner (2010) from the American Diabetes Association’s “Month of Meals” series. The result is over 500 meals, over 600 recipes and snacks giving you unlimited menu combinations. There are 167 meal suggestions with accompanying recipes in each of the sections—breakfast, lunch, and dinner, followed by snack suggestions and recipes grouped by calorie count. Special meals follow, including picnics, holiday meals, and vegetarian meals. The nutrition information will be invaluable for diabetes patients, but it does make the pages look “busy” and rather daunting.

The Betty Crocker Diabetes Cookbook is a team effort with the International Diabetes Center. This 2012 revision is an update of the 2003 edition, with USDA’s MyPlate food symbol instead of the pyramid in the opening pages. There is much wise advice here, followed by eight chapters taking us from breakfast to desserts. The new edition includes 40 new recipes with all new photos.

Another choice, America’s Best Cookbook for Kids with Diabetes (2005) by Colleen Bartley, doesn’t carry the same institutional support as the previous titles, but each recipe has nutritional information and most are followed by a “Dietitian’s Message.” There are a few photos scattered rather randomly throughout the book. And to be frank, nothing about this book yells “kids will love these recipes!” However, it does offer well-thought-out nutrition for a child with diabetes.

Nutrition for a person undergoing cancer treatment is a daily struggle. The Essential Cancer Treatment Nutrition Guide and Cookbook (2012) by Jean LaMantia, RD with Dr. Neil Berinstein, MD, begins with over 100 pages on the ways cancer therapies can affect ones nutrition and how to manage side effects. The recipes are one-to-a-page and easy to follow, if not colorfully illustrated. Tips, survivor wisdom, and make-ahead advice are included where appropriate as well as notes on what symptoms each recipe is recommended to help.

The Cancer-Fighting Kitchen (2009) by Rebecca Katz, features “150 science-based, nutrient-rich recipes” that stimulate appetite and address treatment side effects. The nutrition information is there but unobtrusive and the photos alone will speed recovery!

And once treatment is done? Barbara Unell and Judith Fertig offer a beautiful book to celebrate recovery after treatment for breast cancer. In their 2012 Back in the Swing Cookbook 150 healthful recipes are interspersed with segments like “Who knew” (followed by a quick Q & A) and “Did you hear the news?” offering quick factoids, and “Professor Positive’s” affirmations. The book itself is just beautiful and uplifting and would make a wonderful gift for a friend in recovery.

Allergies are the biggest health challenge for many families. Try Cybele Pascal’s 2012 Allergy-free and Easy Cooking, “recipes for 75 everyday favorites…30-minute meals without gluten, wheat, dairy, eggs, soy, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, and sesame.” Yes, you will have to be careful to purchase ingredients that don’t contain your specific allergen, and search for special ingredients, but the recipes look easy and appetizing. Nutrition information is not included.

For those who need to eat for a “healthy heart” (and who doesn’t?) there’s the American Medical Association Healthy Heart Cookbook. Complete nutrient analysis and fat count is included for each of the 60 well-photographed recipes.

The American Heart Association’s Diabetes & Heart Healthy Cookbook (2nd edition 2014) looks plain vanilla and no-nonsense, inside and out—even the beautiful heart-shaped white bowl on the cover—but
the recipes are planned to tackle diabetes, a major risk factor for heart disease and they don’t need embellishment.

The many books at Howard County Library System should keep you supplied with healthy ideas for whatever your cooking challenges, but do be sure to choose information that is backed by credible research.

  • 6 Cookbooks for Better Health from The Farmers' Market Chef
Barbara Cornell joined the Howard County Library System in 1993 as Assistant Branch Manager at the new Elkridge Branch. Since 2000 she has enjoyed a shorter commute to the Glenwood Branch.

 


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calendar_2014smSaturday, November 8, 2:00 p.m. I’m Going to be a Big Brother or Sister. Prepare for the arrival of a baby in this class at the Central Branch for new siblings. Enjoy stories, activities, and bring a favorite doll or stuffed animal to practice holding a baby. Resources for parents, too. Well & Wise event. Families; 30 – 45 min. Tickets available at Children’s Desk 15 minutes before class.

Saturday, November 8, 2:00-4:00 p.m. Time for a Spa-liday. Need to relax before the holidays? Paint your nails, learn relaxation techniques, listen to soothing music, and make spa treats such as coconut oil hand scrub, bath fizzies, and glycerin soap scrubbies at the Savage Branch. Recipes and ingredients provided. Ages 8-13. Register online or by calling 410.313.0760.

Monday, November 10, 10:00-12:00 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring at the Savage Branch offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

Monday, November 4, 10:15 & 11:15 a.m. Turkey Twist and Shout. Sing and shake your turkey tail to tasty tunes at the Elkridge Branch! Ages 2-5 with adult; 30 min. No registration required.

Thursday, November 13, 1:00 p.m. A World of Kindness. CCome to the East Columbia Branch and celebrate random acts of kindness. Share books, songs, and make a craft. Choose Civility event. Ages 3-5; 30 min. Tickets available at Children’s Desk 15 minutes before class.

Wednesday, Nov. 19, 7 to 9 p.m. Happiest Baby on the Block in Howard County General Hospital’s Wellness Center. Learn successful techniques that can quickly soothe your crying newborn and promote a more restful sleep for your infant. Parent kits are included in the $50 couple fee.

Thursday, Nov. 20, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Great American Smokeout in the Howard County General Hospital lobby: includes information and literature to help you stop smoking. Free event.


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overwhelmed work love and playMy son called me from college this past Sunday to ask me how he was going to find the time to take his bike to the shop to get fixed. He was already overwhelmed with classes, work, and applying to graduate school. How was he supposed to find the time to do everything that he needed to do? I did not have any easy answer for him, and I most certainly did not have an answer he wanted to hear at the time. About an hour later my son called again, and said he no longer needed to take the bike to the shop because while he was driving around campus, trying to find a free place to park, he drove into a parking garage with the bike on top of the car! He had forgotten that the broken bike, the same one we had talked about less than an hour ago, was still on top of the car! I think we can all relate to this story. I am sure most of us feel like there is never enough time to do everything we need to do. We try to do more than one thing at a time, and we wind up not doing anything well. Our to-do lists are never-ending. How can we live saner lives?

The first thing we all need to do is to take time for life. The world is not going to stop so we can finish our to-do lists. When my four children were younger my mantra was “we can only do our best and our best is not the same as someone else’s best, but as long as it is our best it is good enough.” Yes, sometimes my kids had to hand in papers printed in blue or even pink ink because our black ink cartridge had run out and all the stores were closed, but what was important was that the assignment was done and printed. We did our best with what we had at the time. At home and at work, we need to give ourselves permission not to have to do it all. We can start doing this by setting realistic expectations and be willing to realign those expectations, as needed.

It is not easy to find time in the day for ourselves. Advances in technology have made our lives easier, but those same advances have also made our lives more stressful. We are now “available” 24/7 to answer questions from work, school, family, and friends. Brigid Schulte in her book Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time says in chapter 7 there are three questions that drive much of the unending overwhelmedness: How much is enough? When is it good enough? How will I know? These questions are addressed in her book. “Great,” you are thinking, “but when am I going to have time to read a book?” Luckily for you Brigid Schulte will be at HCLS’s Miller Branch on Friday, November 7 at 7pm.

my age of anxietyScott Stossel, editor of The Atlantic, and author of 2014 New York Times bestseller My Age of Anxiety: Fear Hope, Dread, and the Search for Peace of Mind will also be there. Together they will discuss their most recent works. You can register for Scott Stossel and Brigid Schulte in Conversation online at hclibrary.org, by phone at 410-313-1950, or in person at any branch. Their books are availablefor borrowing at the library. Books will also be available for purchase and signing at the event.

We all need to make time for ourselves and what is important to us, which is why I am going to put attending this event on the top of my to-do list. I made a choice to find the time to read Brigid’s book and now I am making the choice to find the time to read Scott’s book this week. It will take courage to make the tough choices needed so we can be healthier both physically and psychologically. I do not want to wait until it is too late to live a good life. Do you?

Nancy Targett is an Instructor & Research Specialist at the Miller Branch. She lives in Columbia and is the proud mom of three boys and a girl and a Siamese cat.

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I want to be healthier, I want to make healthful choices, and, doggone it, I will eat nutritious foods! Okay, all Stuart Smalley affirmations aside (does anyone remember Stuart?), I do not always eat the best foods for me. I try to feed my family well, but when I’m on the go, like many people, I often go for the quick and easy. In fact, when my hubby travels for work, I’ll often make dinner for my kids and then eat something quick (often while standing over the sink like a stereotypical bachelor or college student) after the kids have gone to bed.

I know, I know, this is not good. My doctor has been brutally honest, “Eat better, exercise more, lose weight because now that you are {AGE MYSTERIOUSLY DELETED}, it’s only going to get harder to keep the pounds off.” Darn it, I hate her! (Okay, not really, but the truth is not a pretty one and it makes me cranky and want a candy bar.)

See what I’m up against? I am my own worst enemy and resort to comfort eating too often. So, maybe the first baby step I need to take is to change the foods I associate with comfort. I am trying to take a page from my dear and wonderful colleague who recently wrote about her coming around to Brussels sprouts. I do happen to like a lot of vegetables, but I’m not always as creative or varied.

Again, this is where working for the library comes in super-handy. (Have I mentioned recently how I have the best job?) I did have to leave my comfort zones of Fiction and Teen and venture upstairs to the Nonfiction books. There are a ton of books in the recipe section focused on healthful foods.

the sprouted kitchenThe one that happened to catch my eye this time was The Sprouted Kitchen by Sara Forte, in part because Hugh Forte (Sara’s husband and the book’s photographer) has captured how gorgeous his wife’s recipes turn out, a feast for the eyes as well as the palate. The other reason, I’m ashamed to say, is that any book that promises to be a “tastier take on whole foods” and has chapters entitled “Snacks to Share,” “The Happy Hour,”(!)and “Treats”(!!) can’t be all bad. And it certainly is not. The directions are simple to follow, there is a nice balance of recipes with easy-to-find ingredients and a few on the exotic side (although with the abundance of organic and fresh markets, exotic is not that hard to find these days), and the recipes seem to celebrate the taste of the whose-food ingredients (not try to hide healthful foods in “fun” recipes some like books. In short, this seems to be a “health cookbook” for people who actually like food.

At my home, we tried the mango guacamole with baked corn chips, and it was a huge hit. It felt like a much naughtier and more indulgent snack than it was. Next on our “to try list” are: heirloom tomato stacks with bocconcini and kale pesto, beer bean-and cotija-stuffed poblanos, polenta squares with raw corn and blueberry relish, two-bite grilled cheese (brilliant!), and cocoa hazelnut cupcakes. There is not a lot in this book I wouldn’t be willing to try, and I’m happy to report that Sara Forte has an award-winning blog, so I can keep trying her wholesome-yet-satisfying creations. The Sprouted Kitchen has really given me hope for adopting a completely new approach to comfort food. I may never be a health-food expert, but at least I can feel better about using the best ingredients to make slightly more healthful yet still delicious meals and snacks. (Take that, candy bar!)

Joanne Sobieck-Lingg is glad to blog about her many, disparate interests (though expert in none, except maybe parenthetical asides). In past lives, she was a writer, proofreader, editor, project manager, teacher, and even co-coordinator of a certain health blog. She has been happily ensconced among the fiction and teen books at the Central Branch of HCLS since 2003.

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calendar_2014smMonday, November 3, 10:15 a.m. Just for Me. A class at the Savage Branch for children who are ready for an independent class that includes creative expression, listening comprehension, and early reading skills. Ages 3-5; 30 min. Tickets available at Children’s Desk 15 minutes before class. Also offered at 2 p.m. at the Miller Branch and 11/5 at 10:15 & 11:15 a.m. at the Elkridge Branch.

Monday, November 3, 2:00-6:00 p.m. HiTech Symposium. Join us at the Savage Branch for a dynamic event for students, parents, and educators, featuring STEM industry leaders and showcasing classes and various projects built by HCLS’ HiTech students (including a hovercraft, catapult, weather balloon, and music in our new sound booth). Learn how middle and high school students can participate in this STEM education initiative that teaches cutting-edge science, technology, engineering, and math via project-based classes. HiTech is funded in part through a federal grant from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Institute of Museum and Library Services.Sponsors include Friends of Howard County Library, Frank and Yolanda Bruno, and M&T Bank. Register online or by calling 410.313.0760.

Monday, November 3, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring at the Glenwood Branch offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

Tuesday, November 4, 7:00p.m. Shell Shock: A Study in Medical History from Florence Nightingale to World War I.
Philip Mackowiak, M.D., comes to the Central Branch to discuss the impact of war trauma on Florence Nightingale and the combatants in World War I as he explores shell shock and post-traumatic stress disorder. He is a professor of medicine and the Carolyn Frenkil and Selvin Passen History of Medicine Scholar-in-Residence at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Register online or by calling 410.313.7800.

Tuesday, November 4, 7:00p.m. Guided Meditation. Enjoy a guided mindfulness meditation designed to impart a feeling of peacefulness and connection at the Miller Branch. Please bring a cushion or meditation pillow. Presented by Star Ferguson, M.Ac., L.Ac. Well & Wise event. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

Friday, November 7, 7:00 p.m. Scott Stossel and Brigid Schulte in Conversation. Do you make notes in a book’s margins? Imagine having a conversation with the author about your thoughts. Scott Stossel and Brigid Schulte indulge in the opportunity to discuss their most recent works and ask the pressing questions they’ve penned in the margins of each other’s books. Scott Stossel, editor of The Atlantic, is the author of the 2014 New York Times bestseller, My Age of Anxiety: Fear, Hope, Dread, and the Search for Peace of Mind. An award-winning journalist for The Washington Post, Brigid Schulte wrote the New York Times bestselling Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

Wednesday, Nov. 19, 7 to 9 p.m. Happiest Baby on the Block. Learn successful techniques that can quickly soothe your crying newborn and promote a more restful sleep for your infant in Howard County General Hospital’s Wellness Center. Parent kits are included in the $50 couple fee.


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5216891238_228367e57b_zI love Halloween! I love dressing up, handing out candy to neighborhood kids, and attending as many costume parties as I can. I’ve already worn three different costumes this year, and I still have one more chance to be something else this weekend! Most of all, I love Halloween because of the candy. It’s not just the candy, it’s the way we share and indulge in all that sugary goodness. I know it’s bad to eat 30 mini Twix bars or 25 bite sized Snickers bars in one sitting- I mean, it’s not like I downed a bag of sour gummy worms or maybe about 45 squares of Starburst fruit chews…

Well, I actually didn’t this year, I only ate an entire bag of mini Kit-Kats and a bag of mini Twix bars over a 5 day period sometime in September. I know, I got the bug early this time around, but I can’t say the same for years past. This year, my Halloween candy intake allowance is going to be small, maybe one or two chocolate treats versus an entire bag.

Too much candy is bad for you. There! I said it.

eat this not thatI spent the last two days reading every Eat This, Not That! book that Howard County Library System (HCLS) owns and I learned a few things:

(1) America is fatter than ever.

(2) Labels lie, but nutrition facts don’t.

(3) A couple Twix candy bars have the fat content equivalency of 12 strips of bacon. I’m surprisingly both intrigued and disgusted by that. Also, I feel like there’s probably a Pinterest pinned recipe or something on Reddit about bacon-wrapped-Twix hors d’oeuvres. (Update: I did find something “Twinkie” not “Twix” related and I think my arteries just clogged)

(4) Food products that use beloved characters, movies, etc. to market to children usually have terrible nutritional content.

(5) Eating healthy isn’t always cheaper, but it’s worth it.

(6) Just because something is “low-fat” or “low/zero-sugar” doesn’t mean you can eat more of it.

(7) Knowing is ⅓ the battle. Practicing good food swaps is ⅓. Exercising is (at least) the last ⅓.

(8) These books aren’t an excuse to eat whatever you want. These are practical guides to navigating your daily food choices in not-so-ideal situations. It’s imperative to read these titles cover-to-cover to benefit from the information therein.

(9) What constitutes as “food” these days is kinda scary.

(10) Candy is a terrific!

And when3000245257_9d3416db69_b I say “terrific” I mean massively intense, terror-inducing “terrific.” After reading through the statistics and comparative nutritional facts, I ran the gamut of emotions. I felt validated and then, duped. The pendulum swung from “I already knew that!” and “That’s so obvious!” to “How can we fix ourselves if we’re so deep in it?”

Candy cravings seem to intensify the moment you say you can’t have it or it’s just a “once in a while treat.” Also, candy is so cheap and accessible- and it makes us feel good. The pleasure centers in our brain get over-excited and the cravings for more “feel good” edibles takes over like an addict’s yearning for an abused substance. With just hours before welcoming kids onto my patio and giving them handfuls of sugar & fat laden bombs also known as Kit-Kat and Snickers bars the guilt settles in…

Has the annual Halloween candy haul turned into a slow, painful death-march of candy-drenched-diabesity? No. Truly, we are responsible for what we eat and put into our bodies. Having a few bite sized candy bars isn’t going to kill you, but if you can’t pass up the candy, or find yourself sneaking around for that taboo junk food- there’s a problem and it needs to be addressed. Recall our friend, Sugar Addict Anonymous.

All I want to impart with you is this: Halloween candy may be something you and your children struggle with over the next week or so. Be strong. Be prepared. Make good real food choices, and don’t be so hard on yourself if (when) you mess up.

Zinczenko’s books basically say three things:

(1) Be aware of and eat healthy foods when you’re truly hungry.
(2) Treat yourself once in a while, not once an hour, and not after every meal.
(3) Change is challenging and may feel time consuming, but it’s not impossible. Making one or a few healthier exchanges each day will help you trade up to that healthy, balanced diet you know you need.

Happy Halloween and good luck! I know I’ll need it!

JP is the HCLS Editor & Blog Coordinator for Well & Wise. She is also a Children’s Instructor & Research Specialist at the Savage Branch. She is a storyteller, wannabe triathlete, KPOP-addict, baker of cupcakes, cancer survivor, and liver transplant recipient.

hocoblogs@@@


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troubleAren’t necessarily about the undead, hip vampires, or psychotic galpals.

Sometimes what makes them scary is just that they’re too graphic – even for that precocious adolescent reader.

Parents who take the time to peruse what’s between some of those Skittle-colored book jackets may need to be a little more diligent about what’s out there in Young Adult land.

Take Non Pratt’s nonstarter, Trouble.

Sexually explicit; (with one scene reading like a ‘how to’ manual), Trouble explores the amoral rompings of Hannah; a British fifteen-year-old.

Without brains or a shred of virtue for that matter, Hannah has unprotected sex with so many lackluster guys, (including her stepbrother), that she isn’t sure who gets her pregnant.

Still she rallies on in her teeny skirt and badly applied eye makeup.

A dismal, and as I’ve said, scary read indeed.

Yet, according to a recent New York Times article, teen readers are hunting for titles like Trouble, Slammed, Easy, and Losing It because they all provide “significantly more sex . . .”

Scarier still is what author Abbi Glines believes such books deliver — like “good narrative . . . and emotional intensity . . .”

I say, “Hmmm…” to that.

Most parents (even if they’re not comfortable with it) understand that sexual content in literature is as old as time. Coming of age novels almost always promise that one’s sexuality – as a rite of passage – will be a big part of the fictional journey.

The criteria is that it mirrors real life and the myriad feelings that come with intimacy — like Rainbow Rowell’s haunting Eleanor and Park or Una LaMarche’s, sometimes sensual, Like No Other.

like no othereleanor and park

So, it might just be more worthwhile for older teens to stretch their legs and wander over to adult fiction. There they’ll discover what the cold, hard consequences are when clueless characters like Hannah grow up.

Jean has been working at Howard County Library System’s Central Branch for nearly nine years. She walks in the Benjamin Banneker Park whenever she gets a chance.


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miscarriage_webIt’s baby season on Facebook these days. I love seeing my friends post their exciting news, especially knowing that I have my own special news that I am quietly enjoying right now.

I wonder about the friends that stay quiet. Those that I know love and want kids, but have not posted an announcement for themselves. I wonder if they are feeling that sting that comes with being happy for their friends, but wondering if it will ever be their turn, or knowing that they will never have that turn, or worse yet, knowing they had a turn and it was cut short.

This summer, my husband and I lost a baby. My midwife thought I was farther along than I did, but it didn’t matter. It still hurt. I shared the news gradually with a very small group of people, mostly because I didn’t know how to feel.

I felt bruised. I was sad. I wasn’t devastated, but I still hurt. I had no idea how I would answer the question, “How many kids do you have?” I wanted to say, “Three.” – but people wouldn’t understand. I would cry at the oddest times over the oddest things – things that I had no idea would be a trigger. My husband held me while I cried.

I was pretty numb. I actually stayed at work while it happened because the rest of the leadership team was out that day and I knew someone needed to be there. Only one person in the office knew. I plastered a smile on my face, hunched over my computer, prayed that the cramping would go away quickly, and took the next triage call.

When I lost the baby, my midwife told me that other women would hear about it and tell me their own stories. She told me her story, and it was comforting to know I wasn’t alone. But, I quickly found out that miscarriages are taboo topics. People, especially those who have never experienced a miscarriage, can be very uncomfortable talking about them. Most of us don’t even announce pregnancies until we are past that golden “13 week” mark. It’s almost as if losing a baby doesn’t count until then. Like if we lose the baby in the first trimester, we can deal with it better by ourselves because “it was early.” 

I beg to differ.

miscarriage bookWe need to break this code of silence about the loss of a baby. We need to support each other through good news and bad. We need to be sensitive about the questions we ask, but neither should we be silent. A hug goes a long way. Don’t be afraid of tears. They are healing.

Dads need support too. My husband acknowledged that he did not yet feel as attached as I did, but he still hurt. The baby was half him, after all. And he had to watch me go through the emotional roller-coaster afterwords. I don’t know how he did it.

I still think of the baby often. It’s not every day any more, but I will never forget. If anything, it has given me a greater appreciation for my son and daughter. I don’t take the uneventful pregnancies I had with them for granted any more. Every “normal” milestone I achieve in this pregnancy gives me a sense of gratefulness that I didn’t have before.

I know that my husband will be there for me no matter what, always willing to hold me and let me cry.

And every time I see a friend post that they are expecting, or that their baby has arrived, I am glad. I am grateful that they, and their baby, are healthy. I also say a little prayer for those experiencing the pain of a loss, because I’ve been there- and it’s hard to face someone else’s joy over something you want so much when you’ve had it and lost it.

This pregnancy, I did what I always do – shared the news with close friends and family as soon as we found out. However, this time I plan to announce our news to the world before the 13 week mark. Once we have that first ultrasound I will share our joy, but I will share it with a prayerful heart for those who are hurting because of a loss.

I want to start conversations. Let’s take the taboo out of talking about miscarriage.

Rachel is a wife, mom, and registered nurse. She enjoys photography, playing with her kids, and tearing her house apart and putting it back together.

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calendar_2014smSaturday, October 25, 10:00 a.m. SAT Prep. Take advantage of the SAT Math Prep course at the Savage Branch. It is designed to help students excel on the math portion of the test. Students will take an official practice exam to simulate the experience, learn test-taking strategies, and solve problems related to algebra, geometry, and probability. Grades 9-12 only. Graphing calculators are recommended. 3 Day class October 11, 18, and 25. When you register, you will automatically be registered for all 3 days. HiTech is funded in part by a National Leadership Grant for Libraries from IMLS. Visit hclibrary.org/hitech_events for more HiTech classes. Register online or by calling 410.313.0760.

 Monday, October 27, 10:15 a.m. Just for Me. A class at the Savage Branch for children who are ready for an independent class that includes creative expression, listening comprehension, and early reading skills. Ages 3-5; 30 min. Tickets available at Children’s Desk 15 minutes before class. Also offered at 2 p.m. at the Miller Branch, 10/28 ay 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. at the East Columbia Branch, and 10/29 at 10:15 & 11:15 a.m. at the Elkridge Branch.

Monday, October 27 – Thursday,  October 30, 3:00 p.m. Homework Club. Join us after school at the East Columbia Branch for a snack while working on your homework in a relaxed setting. Ages 11-17. Mondays – Thursdays; 3 – 4 pm (school days only). No registration required.

Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014, 7 to 9 p.m. Free. Prenatal Class for Your Early Pregnancy is for parents-to-be and parents in the first trimester. Learn about the early stages of pregnancy including your body’s physical changes, your baby’s growth and easy ways to promote a healthier pregnancy in Howard County General Hospital’s Wellness Center.

Friday, November 7, 7:00 p.m. Scott Stossel and Brigid Schulte in Conversation. Do you make notes in a book’s margins? Imagine having a conversation with the author about your thoughts. Scott Stossel and Brigid Schulte indulge in the opportunity to discuss their most recent works and ask the pressing questions they’ve penned in the margins of each other’s books. Scott Stossel, editor of The Atlantic, is the author of the 2014 New York Times bestseller, My Age of Anxiety: Fear, Hope, Dread, and the Search for Peace of Mind. An award-winning journalist for The Washington Post, Brigid Schulte wrote the New York Times bestselling Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

Wednesday, Nov. 19, 7 to 9 p.m. Happiest Baby on the Block. Learn successful techniques that can quickly soothe your crying newborn and promote a more restful sleep for your infant in Howard County General Hospital’s Wellness Center. Parent kits are included in the $50 couple fee.

 


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“Wherever I go – in stores, on the street, in restaurants, in people’s homes – I see repetitious scenes of whining, and tantrums, and – even more unsettling – an increased number of kids who look sullen, unrelated, and unhappy.” – Robert Shaw, M.D.

At a recent gala store opening the freebies were flowing — at least till mid-morning when one nine-year-old’s favorite treat ran out.
Several of us customers watched as the sales rep offered the young customer a substitute.
She took the rep to task — loudly.
“That’s not fair!” she stamped her foot. “Everyone else got the one I want! I deserve to get one too!”
The embarrassed parent intervened with an appeasement bordering on pleading: If the child would just be quiet, she’d take her somewhere else and buy her the unavailable item.
The late child psychiatrist, Robert Shaw, would have called this gift – this opportunity – “a teachable moment” – one in which an active parent might seize the day and demonstrate “an ethical response” to such unacceptable petulance.

But that didn’t happen.

the epidemicIn The Epidemic, Shaw dogmatically reasons why:
Today’s indulgent parents are either absurdly permissive or “checked-out” to their children’s emotional needs. They provide all the bells and whistles of excessive living, but scrimp on the moral input.
Case in point: today’s mutation of self-esteem. Where it was once a normal, healthy by-product of emotional development, according to Shaw, it isn’t any longer. Parents in large part, can thank themselves: “Lavishing excessive praise” on their kids, lobbying teachers “for sugar-coated assessments, even lowering expectations,” have all helped foster the current crop of little “self-worshippers.”

And who are the parents Shaw targets? Certainly not “The Have Nots.” “Primarily,” he stresses, “[it’s] a problem in middle- and upper-class families … comfortable families, where there’s plenty of money but simply not enough parental time…” Shaw also gets on that all-powerful electronic babysitter – television. American preschoolers (he says) spend up to fifty-four hours a week in front of one, absorbing TV’s endless communication of both the simplistic and insidious. Messages like “It’s okay to use weapons to deal with conflict. It’s okay to swear, bully, have sex, drink alcohol, and disrespect the adults in your life” have all contributed to the dearth of empathy and compassion in our children.

Indeed, he goes on: “Kids today demonstrate such a startling lack of character traits that many schools resort to a regularly scheduled moral curriculum.”
Disquieting when you think about the lifeline teachers already provide to both student and parent. Disquieting when you think about the “dissatisfaction of American teachers today. For the record, more than 200,000 will choose to leave their profession this year.1

The Epidemic is a stinging, grim, and discomfiting diatribe. Parents will resent and buck everything Shaw criticizes. But in the end, we all have to take it on the chin.

Every critical moment of your child’s life deserves you in it.

Aimee Zuccarini is an Instructor & Research Specialist at the East Columbia Branch. She facilitates several book discussions and writes the book reviews for The Maryland Women’s Journal.

1(Would Greater Independence for Teachers Result in Higher Student Performance? PBS Newshour, August 18, 2014)


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groundbreaking food gardensI hope you have gotten some great produce from your garden this summer. Our garden is beginning to wind down, as yours probably is unless you have made great plans for a fall garden. This is actually a good time to begin thinking about next year’s garden! Now, when your “failures” (no, scratch that) “disappointments” are decomposing in the compost heap, is a good time to record what you would do differently. Do you really want your bean plants that close together? Your carrots that far apart? And what a disappointment that new variety of tomato was! Now, the good variety—let’s save some seeds!

It apparently is a good time to introduce new books on vegetable gardening as well. Here are some shiny new additions to Howard County Library System‘s shelves.

timber guideTimber Press has published several guides to gardening with advice specific to the climates of various parts of the U.S.–the Pacific Northwest, the Mountain States, the Northeast, and, luckily for us, the Southeast. The Timber Press Guide to Vegetable Gardening in the Southeast (2013) is by Ira Wallace of Southern Exposure Seed Exchange. I was happy to see her association with a seed exchange group since the gardener at my house is looking for advice on saving seeds from the best of our tomatoes. I really like the organization of this book. After a brief introduction to our climate, we have Gardening 101, and a section on garden planning. Following these are chapters for each month, covering “To do this Month,” what to “Plan, Prepare, and Maintain,” what to “Sow and Plant,” and “Fresh Harvest.” Each month is closed with a “Skill Set” project like staking or drip irrigation or starting a compost heap. The final 50 pages are an alphabetical guide to “Edibles A to Z.” There are some gems of advice in here—I want it for my home bookshelf!

Jean-Martin Fortier, in his The Market Gardener: a Successful Grower’s Handbook for Small-Scale Organic Farming (2014), demonstrates how a “micro-farm” of only one and a half acres can produce enough to feed 200 families in their CSA (Community Supported Agriculture), in Canada, no less! In their 10 years at the business Fortier and his wife have developed some clever techniques and devised special equipment, shared here in clear line drawings. His chapters on pests, starting seeds, fertilizing, and more are enhanced with sidebars giving tips and advice. In spite of the author’s Canadian home-base—cooler by far than our climate—very little of his advice would not be useful in Maryland!

Do you like to browse through magazines to see how other peoples houses look inside? Do you like to see how beautiful their gardens look and long to replicate their successes? Take a look at Niki Jabbour’s Groundbreaking Food Gardens: 73 Plans That Will Change the Way You Grow Your Garden (2014). The gardens vary from “Wildlife Friendly” to “Critter Control,” from “Eggs and Everything,” built around a chicken coop, to the “Edible Campus” planted between buildings at McGill University. You won’t find gorgeous photos here, but colored sketches that I find more instructive. There is truly something for every gardener in these 250 pages.

year-round vegetable gardnerNiki Jabbour’s previous book, The Year-Round Vegetable Gardener (2011), is a similarly useful guide, especially for the gardener who does not want a break from planting and harvesting. She promises to show “how to grow your own food 365 days a year no matter where you live.”

Josie Jeffery’s new book, The Mix & Match Guide to Companion Planting, promised great things— “an easy organic way to deter pests, prevent disease, improve flavor, and increase yields in your vegetable garden,” but was a mild disappointment to me. I really liked the short introductory chapters, but got lost trying to use the colored dots to mix and match the strips (three to a page) that represent the central crops, aboveground companions, and belowground companions. Maybe with a little more study I could appreciate it more, but it seemed like too much work. Still it’s a useful directory of plants—and pretty to look at!

Maybe these garden planning books will help you decide to become a year-round gardener—or just a better summer gardener! Good luck!

Barbara Cornell joined the Howard County Library System in 1993 as Assistant Branch Manager at the new Elkridge Branch. Since 2000 she has enjoyed a shorter commute to the Glenwood Branch.

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calendar_2014smMonday, Oct. 20, 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Glenwood Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

Monday, Oct. 20, 3:30 p.m. Superfoods at Miller. Some foods promote health and longevity better than others. Licensed nutritionist Karen Basinger names these powerhouses and how to best use them. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

Tuesday, Oct. 21, 9 to 11:30 a.m. Diabetes Screening & BMI. Free. Held in Howard County General Hospital’s Wellness Center. Meet with an RN for a glucose blood test, BMI measurement and weight management information. Immediate resu­lts. Fasting eight hours prior recommended.

Tuesday, Oct. 21, 7 to 8:30 p.m. Choose Your Pediatrician and Promote Your Newborn’s Health. Free. Held in Howard County General Hospital’s Wellness Center. Learn factors to consider and questions to ask when choosing your pediatrician and ways you can promote your newborn’s health. Presented by Dana Wollney, M.D.

Thursday, Oct. 23, 7 to 9 p.m. Get Moving Again: Total Joint Replacement. Held in Howard County General Hospital’s Wellness Center. Free. Learn about total hip and knee surgery from health care professionals, past patients of our Joint Academy and Richard Kinnard, M.D.

Monday, Oct. 27, 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Adult, Child and Infant CPR/AED in Howard County General Hospital’s Wellness Center. Cost is $55. This course will teach the skills needed to clear an airway obstruction, perform cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and how to use an automated external defibrillator (AED).


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pumpkin_webThe crisp cool temperatures, the gradual appearance of colored hues in the vegetation, and the leaves falling one by one in their choreographed descent, are all signs that autumn is officially upon us.  In addition, there are your traditional celebratory markers of the season’s arrival, such as hayrides, Halloween stuff everywhere, and (of course) pumpkins galore! There are plenty pumpkin patches ready to be explored, pumpkins being sold for carving and decorating, pumpkin drinks, pumpkin deserts, and pumpkin dishes.  Coincidentally, pumpkins begin to ripen in September, which makes them readily available through fall and winter.  And though, we primarily associate pumpkins with Fall and Halloween, we should also begin associating them with healthy eating (if we don’t already).

nutritional healingPumpkins aren’t simply great as porch decorations, or for adding seasonal flavor to your beverage of choice.  Pumpkins are vegetables rich in antioxidants and vitamins (particularly vitamin A), and low in calories.  On October 5, 2014, the Huffington Post published an article titled 8 Impressive Health Benefits of Pumpkin, which notably mentioned some of the many healthy reasons we should all be incorporating more pumpkin into our diet.  The health benefits listed in the article include keeping eyesight sharp, aiding in weight lost, promoting heart health with pumpkin seeds, reducing cancer risk, protecting the skin, boosting one’s mood, post-workout recovery, and boosting the immune system.  Each of these benefits may come as no surprise due to the high level of antioxidants, vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin E found in pumpkins.

According to the National Institutes of Health’s National Cancer Institute website, antioxidants are “chemicals that block the activity of other chemicals known as free radicals.  Free radicals are highly reactive and have the potential to cause damage to cells, including damage that may lead to cancer.”  While the body does naturally produce internal antioxidants known as endogenous antioxidants, it also relies on external antioxidants known as dietary antioxidants found in the foods we eat.

functional foodieBalch’s Prescription for Nutritional Healing touts the importance of vitamin A; as one of the types of dietary antioxidants, which promotes eye health, enhances immunity, maintains and repairs epithelial tissue, and protects against colds and infections, guards against heart disease and stroke, and lowers cholesterol levels.  And in Nix’s The Functional Foodie we learn that some of the many antioxidant carotenoids found in pumpkins include beta-carotene (a precursor of vitamin A), beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin.  Balch further explains that carotenoids, a class of phytochemicals, are fat-soluble pigments found in yellow, red, green, and orange vegetable and fruits; they have the ability to act as anticancer agents, decrease the risk of cataracts and age-related macular degeneration, and inhibit heart disease.  One of the most commonly known carotenoids, beta-carotene, can be converted into vitamin A, and is therefore one of the main sources of dietary vitamin A.

Pumpkins are being sold in many places this time of year, and are plentiful in locally grown pumpkin patches right here in Howard County, such as Clark’s Elioak Farm in Ellicott City, and Gorman Farm.  So whether you make it to a patch or your grocery store, get yourself a pumpkin and start reaping the health benefits that pumpkins have in store.

When Jinelee De Souza isn’t channeling her inner super-heroine at Howard County Library System as an Instructor & Research Specialist, she’s doing so at the gym, during impromptu photoshoots with her bff, and everywhere in between.

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Published by First Second in 2013, Lucy Knisley’s graphic novel Relish is full of tips, tricks, and little tidbits about food, while still managing to tell an interesting and relatable story about her life.relish

In this memoir of her life growing up surrounded by and enjoying food, Knisley describes seminal memories she attaches to different cuisine. Many of her stories are funny, some are poignant, and some are a little sad – but all of them involve eating, selling, and living alongside food and cooking. Each chapter is followed by a recipe – all of which sound delicious and are broken down enough that even I could cook them. There’s a lot of variety in the included recipes, extending from huevos rancheros to sushi to the best chocolate chip cookies. I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention Knisley’s bright, colorful, and clear style that’s simply entertaining to look at and read through. It’s fully colored, very bright, and eye catching. The cartoony figures fit in perfectly and the food is only a little simplified and very easy to understand. I wouldn’t expect drawings of food to be as enticing as photos in a fancy cookbook, but Knisley does an excellent job taking advantage of the medium.

In chapter 8, “The apple doesn’t fall far from the cheese”, Knisley explains how her mother worked at the cheese counter of a gourmet food shop in New York City. Knisley eventually followed in her mother’s footsteps, working at the cheese counter of a gourmet store in Chicago after graduating from art school. The chapter closes with “A second-generation cheerful cheesemonger’s Cheese Cheat Sheet”, which veritably explodes with as many cheese facts as can be fit into a two page spread. This page also contains my favorite fact from this book – one that made my lactose intolerant husband very happy – “Aging cheeses breaks down lactose, so most aged cheeses can be eaten by lactose intolerants!” I think he now thanks Lucy Knisley quietly every time he enjoys a delicious slice of extra sharp cheddar.

Relish is all at once a memoir, a graphic novel, and a cookbook, and it does a nice job at all three. Knisley has a very pleasing style of both writing and drawing, making her work very accessible and enjoyable. Plus, her stories are just fun to read and her experiences and feelings are very relatable, even if you didn’t grow up surrounded by gourmet food.

Jessica Seipel is an Instructor & Research Specialist at the Savage Branch. She has worked for the Howard County Library System, in various positions, for a decade.

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2496308570_c4245a2d4b_zI recently had an experience that tested the popular British mantra: “Keep calm and carry on.” What happened? I was trapped in an elevator.

It’s not the first time, I’m afraid. I have a history with elevators. But it has been several years since I was last involuntarily trapped in an elevator.

Ironically, I was returning home from a relaxing massage appointment when the elevator broke down with me inside. Luckily, the emergency call button worked and help was called right away.

The hardest part was waiting in the capsule, feeling the heat and anxiety build. I’m not usually a claustrophobic person. Quiet doesn’t bother me, nor does solitude. But the fact of being in a space I cannot leave started to make me sweat and itch.

I felt the urge to scream. But no, that wouldn’t help and it wouldn’t make me feel better—just more upset about a situation I couldn’t change.

Breathing helped—not too big or quickly. Slow, regular breaths. Take it easy. Be steady.

I called my husband to let him know what happened. (Thank goodness for cell phones!) It made me feel better that he knew I was safe, just waiting for help.
Then, the emergency responder called back and asked me for my information while we waited. Hearing her voice was soothing—the world was still out there and I would soon return. She saw the fire department responders coming and let me know of their arrival.

They called through the door to ask if I was OK. I could see them and was relieved. The outer door was open in moments, but they struggled with the inner door. Finally it popped open like it was meant, and I could roll out in my wheelchair.

It was good to see the faces of strangers. Funny that it had only been about a half hour, but it felt like longer. They asked if I wanted to see the paramedic, if I was OK. I shook my head—I was fine, just wanted to get back home.

“I’m sprung,” I joked with my husband as I headed home. I felt liberated and that I’d won a small battle by keeping the fear demons at bay.
Sometimes we are challenged unexpectedly and have to summon calm and strength in strange places. I was reminded of the power of staying cool in (literally) a tight spot. This is a lesson I hope not to forget and can be applied more widely in daily life.

From stressful work situations to the annoyances of daily commuting, a little calm and breathing can go a long way to finding a way through the moment.

Kelly Mack lives in Washington, DC, and works for a marketing communications firm.

 


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teach your children wellLast month, I discussed some vexing behavior exhibited by parents during children’s sporting events. Among my key points were my belief that competitive environments can be very good for children, that there are some people who need to learn to deal with disappointment and frustration in graceful ways, and, mainly, that some adults might need to consider teaching and modeling methods of civil communication/behavior to their children. I also looked at some causes for some parents’ own lack of self-control, namely “ego-involvement.”

I hit on a lot of what I wanted to in that post, but in light of Choose Civility Week, I felt like there might be even more to say on this topic (plus, some of what I discussed I felt bore repeating since soccer season is in full swing). Around the holidays last year, when I was battling (and blogging about) an attack of the “gimme’s” in my house, I mentioned the book Teach Your Children Well by Madeline Levine, Ph.D. I remembered liking the book very much, so I decided to revisit it to see what it said with regard to parents’ “exuberance” toward their kids’ activities.

Levine does not discuss athletics in her book so much, but she does address parents’ over-involvement in their children’s sports, as well as other activities, to illustrate some of her points:

“We must shift our focus from the excesses of hyperparenting, our preoccupation with a narrow and shortsighted vision of success that has debilitated many of our children, and an unhealthy reliance on them to provide status and meaning in our own lives, and return to the essentials of parenting in order for children to grow into their most healthy and genuine selves.”

Levine covers in greater depth the ways parents can model and teach a greater sense of fair play, civility, ethics, and even independence to their children (and avoid the pitfalls of their own ego-involvement). I can’t even begin to go into the detail that she does in her book, but she provides key steps and examples to help during different age ranges. For example, in the chapter focused on 5-11 year-olds, she covers friendship, learning, sense of self, empathy, and play. In the chapter on the middle school years, puberty and health, independence, and peer groups are discussed. And for high school ages, Levin focuses on adult thinking, sexuality, identity, and autonomy.

She devotes the last two chapters of the book to “Teaching Our Kids to Find Solutions” and “Teaching Our kids to Take Action.” And, in the “Taking Action” chapter, one of the key components she discusses is self-control. Levine discusses how many children’s emotional difficulties may have at least some footing in problems with self-regulation. She asserts, “The importance of the internal ability to say no, to control impulsivity, to delay gratification cannot be overestimated as a protective factor in child and adolescent development.” But she also warns that parents can overreact to lack of self-control and “catastrophize the situation” to the point that teaching opportunities are missed.

Levine strongly suggests that some of the best ways to help a child develop better self-control include letting him/her experience and learn to manage moderate amounts of distress and challenges, positively acknowledging your child’s ability to “go against the crowd” and not succumb to peer pressure, and modeling good self-management strategies. Again, if you don’t want your kids to be bad sports, make sure that you are not exhibiting that behavior yourself.

Joanne Sobieck-Lingg is glad to blog about her many, disparate interests (though expert in none, except maybe parenthetical asides). In past lives, she was a writer, proofreader, editor, project manager, teacher, and even co-coordinator of a certain health blog. She has been happily ensconced among the fiction and teen books at the Central Branch of HCLS since 2003.

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calendar_2014smSaturday, Oct. 4, 1:00 p.m. Hands Only CPR & AED at Glenwood Branch. Learn how to start CPR right away and continue doing chest compressions until help arrives. Learn about cardiac arrest, how to recognize it’s happening, and the three simple steps of Hands-only CPR for victims over 8 years old. Receive a basic overview of an automated external defibrillator (AED). Training in Hands-Only CPR gives you the ability to help save a life without using mouth-to-mouth ventilation or obtaining a certification card. Ages 11-17. Register online or by calling 410.313.5577.

Monday, Oct. 6, 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Glenwood Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

Monday, Oct. 6, 3:30 p.m. Improving Your Mood Through Meditative Art at Miller Branch. Research shows that creative activities can boost serotonin levels. Join us in the Enchanted Garden as we use artistic expression to improve our moods. All levels of artistic ability welcome. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

Tuesday, Oct. 7, 7:00 p.m. Hands Only CPR & AED at Elkridge Branch. Learn how to start CPR right away and continue doing chest compressions until help arrives. Learn about cardiac arrest, how to recognize it’s happening, and the three simple steps of Hands-only CPR for victims over 8 years old. Receive a basic overview of an automated external defibrillator (AED). Training in Hands-Only CPR gives you the ability to help save a life without using mouth-to-mouth ventilation or obtaining a certification card. Ages 11-17. Register online or by calling 410.313.5088.

Tuesday, Oct. 7, 7:00 p.m. Guided Meditation at Miller Branch.Enjoy a guided mindfulness meditation designed to impart a feeling of peacefulness and connection. Please bring a cushion or meditation pillow. Presented by Star Ferguson, M.Ac., L.Ac.Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

Tuesday, Oct. 7, 7 to 9 p.m. Happiest Baby on the Block in Howard County General Hospital’s Wellness Center. Learn successful techniques that can quickly soothe your crying newborn and promote a more restful sleep for your infant. Parent kits are included in the $50 couple fee.

Thursday, Oct. 9, 3 to 5 p.m. Depression Screening. In recognition of National Depression Screening Day, Howard County General Hospital offers a free, confidential screening for depression in the hospital’s Wellness Center. Includes lecture, video, self-assessment and individual evaluation.

Thursday, Oct. 9, 7 to 9 p.m. What is Pre-Diabetes? Has your doctor told you that you have pre-diabetes or risk factors for developing diabetes? Howard County General Hospital’s certified diabetes educator and registered dietitian will teach you how to make changes to prevent or delay an actual diabetes diagnosis. Held in the hospital’s Wellness Center. Cost is $15.

Saturday, Oct. 11, 2014, 9 to 11 a.m. Kids Self Defense for children ages 8 to 12. Learn basic principles of safety awareness and age appropriate techniques. Cost is $27. Held in Howard County General Hospital’s Wellness Center.

Tuesday, Oct. 14, 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Elkridge Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

Tuesday, Oct. 14, 2:00 p.m. The Art of Aging: Three Secrets to Making Today the Best Day of Your Life at Miller Branch. L. Andrew Morgan, director of marketing at Vantage House, teaches a three-step process that directs older adults to reconnect, reenergize, and refocus on their priorities during post-retirement years. A Well & Wise event presented in partnership with Howard County Department of Citizen Services and Office on Aging. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.


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Are you guilty of skipping breakfast in the morning? Did you know there is science to support the belief that breakfast is the most important meal of the day? If you are like me, you answered “yes” to both those questions. Would you say “no” to getting more fiber, calcium, vitamins A and C, riboflavin, zinc, and iron? Would you say “no” to having lower blood cholesterol levels, better digestive health, and to helping your body regulate insulin levels? Of course not! Together we need to say “yes” to eating breakfast every day – and if you have kids, your kids will be more likely to eat breakfast if you do. If you need more compelling reasons to eat breakfast, read this.

Breakfast is one of the easiest meals to make healthy. The next time you are in the grocery store check out the cereal aisle. There are many healthy options. Look for a cereal with more than 5 grams of fiber and less than 5 grams of sugar. Grab a bowl, add some skim milk and fresh fruit, and take just a few minutes to start your day off right.

soup to nutsHoward County Library System has a great collection of cookbooks to help you plan your morning meal. The Mason Jar Soup to Nuts Cookbook by Lonnette Parks is a fun way to get started. In this book you will find recipes for pancakes, waffles, muffins, granola crunch and more. You can make the jar recipes for your family and then make some as gift jars for relatives and friends. The best part is that you can make them ahead of time. I hope this book will inspire you to make your own mason jar creations. You can create your own parfait by layering yogurt, fruit and oats or granola in a mason jar. You can choose any yogurt, but Greek yogurt usually has the most calcium and protein. Oats contain beta-glucan a type of fiber that has been shown to help lower cholesterol when eaten regularly. Add your favorite fresh or frozen fruit. Bananas have a healthy dose of potassium, an electrolyte that helps lower your blood pressure naturally, and bananas will help keep you feeling full longer. Strawberries and blueberries are rich in antioxidants and are lower in calories than many other fruits. You can make these colorful parfait jars in advance, so all you have to do in the morning is grab one and a spoon. If you take your jar to work you will have to beware of co-workers who follow you with spoons!

hungry girl 300If you would like something hot for breakfast instead, you can try some of the protein-packed, low-calorie hot breakfast egg mugs recipes in Hungry Girl 300 under 300: Breakfast, lunch & Dinner Dishes under 300 Calories by Lisa Lillien. Some of the recipes to try in this book include the Denver Omellette in a Mug, Eggs Bene-Chick Mug, or the All-American Egg Mug. Most can be ready to eat in ten minutes! These recipes use a liquid egg substitute. Eggs are a healthy source of protein and nutrients like Vitamin D. The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends that people with normal cholesterol, limit cholesterol intake to 300 milligrams per day. You can read more about the AHA dietary guidelines here.

smoothiesYou will also find a chapter (4) on “no-heat-required” morning meals. How about a Double-O- Strawberry Quickie Kiwi Smoothie? You can make this in five minutes with 1 cup frozen strawberries, 1 peeled kiwi, ½ cup fat-free strawberry yogurt, and 1 cup crushed ice. Smoothies are easy to make with little mess. They are great for breakfast on-the-go and are only limited by your imagination and what you have in your refrigerator. For more smoothie ideas try Superfood Smoothies: 100 Delicious, Energizing & Nutrient-Dense Recipes by Julie Morris. Finally, you might want to check out Whole-Grain Mornings: New Breakfast Recipes to Span the Seasons by Megan Gordon for some delicious seasonal recipes.

Are you hungry now? Are you already thinking about what you can have for breakfast tomorrow? If you are like me, you answered “yes” to both of those questions. Breakfast will give us the energy and fuel we need to get through the day. We are ready to make the commitment to break for breakfast!

Nancy Targett is an Instructor & Research Specialist at the Miller Branch. She lives in Columbia and is the proud mom of three boys and a girl and a Siamese cat.

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forget me notI love picture books. I love to read them, share them with children, talk about them, and get lost in wonder at the ability of authors and illustrators to perfectly meld text and illustration. I especially treasure when I find books that capture the emotional truth of difficult subjects.

Forget Me Not by Nancy Van Laan is an Alzheimer’s story. Julia loves her grandmother and is afraid and worried when grandmother becomes forgetful, starts wandering, and finally becomes unable to care for herself. Van Laan deftly guides the reader through the stages of Alzheimers, always through the child’s perspective. When it becomes clear to Julia and her family that grandmother can no longer safely live alone they make together the decision to move her from her home to “a place that will give her the special care she needs.” Muted color washes of blue, green, and yellow contribute to the gentle, delicately perceptive tone of this book.

I lost my mother to dementia a year ago, I wish this book had been around then.

the very tiny babyThe Very Tiny Baby by Sylvie Kantorovitz is a rock star at addressing the serious issues surrounding a premature baby from a sibling’s point of view. Luckily, Jacob has his teddy bear to pour out all of his mixed-up feelings. Sibling rivalry, fear for his mommy, and resentment at the lack of attention are all poured into the understanding ears of Bear. The hand-lettered text and scrapbook style drawings engage the young reader and provide a safe outlet for children in Jacob’s situation.

A keen sense of a child’s perspective makes this a useful book to have in your Tender Topics arsenal.

my fathers arms are a boatMy Father’s Arms Are a Boat by Erik Lunde. This beautiful, quiet, sad book is respectful of the grief of both father and son. Unable to sleep, the boy seeks comfort in his father’s arms. Bundled up, the boy and his father go out into the cold, starry Norwegian night. The boy asks his father “Is Mommy asleep?… She’ll never wake up again?” The father’s soft refrain to his son, “Everything will be alright” as he calms his fears and answers his questions, resonates the truth of the present sadness and the hope for the future. The paper collage and ink illustrations monochromatic tones convey the sorrow, while the flashes of red (like the warmth of the fire) allow the reader, like the young boy, to find comfort in the love of those still with us. The final spread of this Norwegian import is lovely and life affirming.

Shirley ONeill works for Howard County Library System as the Children’s and Teen Materials Specialist. She cannot believe she actually gets paid to do this job.

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calendar_2014smTuesday, Sept. 30, 7:00 p.m. Cutting Edge Discoveries in Neuroscience to Boost Your Brai at Miller Branch. In this three-part series, Majid Fotuhi, M.D., Ph.D., teaches how to boost brain capacity at any age. The founder and chief medical officer of NeurExpand, Fotuhi has written three books about brain health: Boost Your Brain: The New Art and Science Behind Enhanced Brain Performance; The Memory Cure; and The New York Times Crosswords to Keep Your Brain Young: The 6-Step Age-Defying Program. Fotuhi received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School and his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His research findings have been published in The Journal of Neuroscience, The Lancet, Nature, Neurology, Neuron, and The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Fotuhi has been featured on PBS, The Dr. Oz Show, CNN, Discovery Channel, NBC’s TODAY show, and numerous other national media.

Sept. 30 Part 1: Diet and Your Brain Learn which foods can make your memory sharper and stronger.

Dec. 8 Part 2: Stress and Your Brain Discover how stress can shrink your brain and what you can do within three months to reverse its effects.

Jan. 8 Part 3: Sleep and Your Brain Explore how to harness the power of sleep to expand your brain capacity.

A Well & Wise and Meet the Author event. Presented in partnership with Howard County Department of Citizen Services and Office on Aging. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

Thursday, Oct. 2, 7 to 8:30 p.m. The ABCs of Getting More ZZZZZZZZs in the hospital’s Wellness Center. You’re not alone if you have trouble getting a good night’s sleep — insomnia is the most common sleep disorder. Learn strategies for beating insomnia from Luis Buenaver, M.D., Johns Hopkins behavioral sleep specialist practicing at the Johns Hopkins Center for Sleep at HCGH. Free.

Saturday, Oct. 4, 1:00 p.m. Hands Only CPR & AED at Glenwood Branch. Learn how to start CPR right away and continue doing chest compressions until help arrives. Learn about cardiac arrest, how to recognize it’s happening, and the three simple steps of Hands-only CPR for victims over 8 years old. Receive a basic overview of an automated external defibrillator (AED). Training in Hands-Only CPR gives you the ability to help save a life without using mouth-to-mouth ventilation or obtaining a certification card. Ages 11-17. Register online or by calling 410.313.5577.

Monday, Oct. 6, 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening at Glenwood Branch. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring offered by Howard County General Hospital: a Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine. No registration required.

Monday, Oct. 6, 3:30 p.m. Improving Your Mood Through Meditative Art at Miller Branch. Research shows that creative activities can boost serotonin levels. Join us in the Enchanted Garden as we use artistic expression to improve our moods. All levels of artistic ability welcome. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

Tuesday, Oct. 7, 7:00 p.m. Hands Only CPR & AED at Elkridge Branch. Learn how to start CPR right away and continue doing chest compressions until help arrives. Learn about cardiac arrest, how to recognize it’s happening, and the three simple steps of Hands-only CPR for victims over 8 years old. Receive a basic overview of an automated external defibrillator (AED). Training in Hands-Only CPR gives you the ability to help save a life without using mouth-to-mouth ventilation or obtaining a certification card. Ages 11-17. Register online or by calling 410.313.5088.

Thursday, Oct. 9, 3 to 5 p.m. Depression Screening in the hospital Wellness Center. Includes lecture, video, self-assessment and an individual, confidential evaluation with a mental health practitioner. Free.

Thursday, Oct. 9, 7 to 9 p.m. Have Pre-Diabetes? Our certified diabetes educator and registered dietitian will teach you how to make changes to prevent/delay actual diabetes in the hospital Wellness Center. $15.


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jess bookEver since I started using Pinterest regularly, Facebook has kind of lost its shine for me. There are so many neat things about the former that the latter just cannot offer. Though over ten million people use Pinterest these days, there’s always still a chance you may be new to it.

Pinterest is a pinboard-style photo-sharing website that lets users to create and keep track of theme-based image collections such as events, interests, and hobbies. Obviously, Pinterest isn’t going to dramatically change your life. What it can do, though, is help it inspire it, whether it’s with your diet, the make-up you want to use, or ways to keep your mood going strong and stress-free.

It’s easy to sign up for a Pinterest account, but if you don’t want to or simply feel you can’t be bothered with an account, you can use the search box on Pinterest to find what you want. Bypassing account login (which normally is how you first are able to use the “search” box) you can use Pinterest by doing a Pinterest search through Google. Once you’re in that way, you can search Pinterest as long as your heart desires.

“[Pinterest] is fascinating,” said Brendan Gallagher of Digitas Health. “It’s social commerce cleverly disguised as an aspirational visual scrapbook.” Aspirational sounds about right. There are so many great things to be discovered on this often surprisingly productive social networking site.

jess pcLet’s say you’re interested in dental health and want to motivate yourself or your family to get better at brushing. You can go here: Good Food Vs. Bad Food (for your teeth) | How to Improve Dental Health | Dental Health Info Graphics

If you’re determined to eat better than you do, check out great superfoods ideas and other healthy lifestyle tips here: Better Health Info Graphics | Antioxidants

If you love coffee, but wonder whether it’s doing you more harm than good, Pinterest has something for that, too: Medical Benefits of Being Addicted to Coffee

Are you a woman worried about heart disease? Are you a man who’s fallen behind on pertinent health news? What’s up with migraines? By the way, when was your last physical exam?

Okay. I got excited there! I think it’s clear that you can search for healthy inspiration or explore your other curiosities, like proper dining etiquette, job interviewing skills, removing permanent marker stains from anything, or creating easy outfit access in the morning (especially if you have children who always seem to be rushing around right before the school bus arrives). However, a note of caution: while Pinterest is for everyone, what’s pinned isn’t always trustworthy intel. Just like anything else you might find online, be sure to consult medical professionals before trying any kind of diet or exercise plan.

So, if you want to become a Pinterest person, here are some good rules to follow to make it more worthwhile. Happy (and healthy) pinning!

Angie Engles has been with the Howard County Library System for 17 years, 14 of which were at the Savage Branch. She currently works at the Central Branch primarily in the Fiction and Audio-visual departments. Her interests include music, books, and old movies.


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How strong is the biological element in gender? Is it psychologically possible, in infancy, to engineer one’s sexuality? At what point in utero are we wired to be male or female?

In 1966 rural Winnipeg, none of these facts mattered to a teenaged couple whose baby boy had recently suffered a botched circumcision and now faced a life they could not imagine. They would journey all the way to Baltimore to the Johns Hopkins Psychohormonal Research Unit under the auspices of psychologist, John Money. Their son, they were promised, would be successfully reassigned as a girl. What Janet and Ron Reimer may not have been told was that “sexual reassignment had never been done on a normal child with normal genitals and nervous system.”

Journalist John Colapinto delivers a precise and compelling examination of a world-famous case that proved “pre-birth factors set limits on how far culture, learning, and environment can direct gender identity in humans” in As Nature Made Him: The Boy Who Was Raised as a Girl.

Only more compelling is getting to know David Reimer himself. A girl from the age of two until eighteen, his battle with depression and self-loathing is heartbreaking—shocking at times—but you will come away believing he is one of the bravest people you have ever met.

Aimee Zuccarini is an Instructor & Research Specialist at the East Columbia Branch. She facilitates several book discussions and writes the book reviews for The Maryland Women’s Journal.

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Tuesday, Sept. 23, 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dietary Counseling in the HCGH Wellness Center. This individualized nutrition program is for children and adults. Meet with a registered dietitian one-on-one to discuss your dietary concerns and goals. The counseling is also appropriate for those who want to gain weight, maintain a vegetarian diet and more. Cost is $35.

Saturday, Sept. 23, 7:00 p.m. Meet the Author, HCLS Signature Event: Dr. Neal Barnard Presents Healthy Approaches to Weight Control, Reversing Diabetes, and the Best of Health at Miller Branch. Neal Barnard, M.D., renowned nutrition researcher and New York Times bestselling author, discusses the connection between nutrition and health. Dr. Barnard’’s clinical research revolutionized the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Learn how to control and even reverse this condition. Discover how the same simple diet changes that benefit diabetes patients also bring a wide range of health benefits, including weight control, lower cholesterol levels, protection from memory loss, and greater vitality. Dr. Barnard reveals a proven method of weight control that relies on food choices rather than starvation diets or gimmicks. A Well & Wise event. Presented in partnership with Howard County Department of Citizen Services and Office on Aging. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950. (Meet the Author, HCLS Signature Event.)

Friday, Sept. 26, 6 to 7 p.m. Advance Directives free workshop in the HCGH Wellness Center. Understand why you should have these documents, how to get them and complete them/leave with the documents.

Friday, Sept. 26, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. AARP Driver Safety for Older Drivers is a refresher for drivers 50 and older. Cost is $15 for AARP members, $20 for others. Held in the HCGH Wellness Center.

Saturday, Sept. 27, 9 a.m. to Noon. Women’s Self Defense for  ages 16 and up. Cost is $50. Learn and practice effective, easy-to-learn techniques. Held in the HCGH Wellness Center.

Tuesday, Sept. 30, 7:00 p.m. Cutting Edge Discoveries in Neuroscience to Boost Your Brai at Miller Branch. In this three-part series, Majid Fotuhi, M.D., Ph.D., teaches how to boost brain capacity at any age. The founder and chief medical officer of NeurExpand, Fotuhi has written three books about brain health: Boost Your Brain: The New Art and Science Behind Enhanced Brain Performance; The Memory Cure; and The New York Times Crosswords to Keep Your Brain Young: The 6-Step Age-Defying Program. Fotuhi received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School and his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His research findings have been published in The Journal of Neuroscience, The Lancet, Nature, Neurology, Neuron, and The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Fotuhi has been featured on PBS, The Dr. Oz Show, CNN, Discovery Channel, NBC’s TODAY show, and numerous other national media.

Sept. 30 Part 1: Diet and Your Brain-Learn which foods can make your memory sharper and stronger.
Dec. 8 Part 2: Stress and Your Brain-Discover how stress can shrink your brain and what you can do within three months to reverse its effects.
Jan. 8 Part 3: Sleep and Your Brain-Explore how to harness the power of sleep to expand your brain capacity.

A Well & Wise and Meet the Author event. Presented in partnership with Howard County Department of Citizen Services and Office on Aging. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

 


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driveChoosing to embark on a journey of self-improvement is the best gift you can give yourself. One of the many ways you can do this is by starting a new hobby or craft. Depending on who you are, you might want to create something or maybe you want to learn a new skill. Regardless, you will experience quite the array of emotions throughout the process… but that’s half the fun; isn’t it?

As the leaves change and the air becomes crisp, I tend to get inspired. I find myself looking at the fall foliage and wanting to create something. I’ll breathe in the chilly air and suddenly need to sit down and pick up my out-of-tune guitar. However, staying motivated can be tough in between life chores and scheduled meals. I feel that the excuse, “I’m too busy” is used quite a bit in our hectic world. I know that I am definitely guilty of this.

When making a change in your life, you have to be mentally prepared. When it comes to adding in a new hobby, learning to manage your time and set realistic goals become vital pieces of the motivation puzzle. Letting something you love be the first thing dropped when time is an issue, will only hurt you in the long run. It is important to do things that bring you happiness and joy. Developing time-management skills is one of the best things you can do for yourself. I experienced a crash course on the topic while taking a particular college class. My professor gave us enough work for a lifetime and expected nothing but the best. I was forced to figure out how to complete all of his work to the best of my ability while still passing my other classes. The skills I gained (though at an accelerated speed) have stuck with me and are put into action on a regular basis. Making a desired skill or hobby a part of your schedule is very fulfilling.

beadsSetting realistic goals will save you from a lot of stress. If you want to learn how to make jewelry, don’t try to make an entire set in one week. Instead, try to learn a certain technique and keep building on that foundation in the following weeks. If you want to write a book, don’t try to write a chapter a day, just be sure to write something (one sentence counts). The last thing you want is for your new found interest to become a chore or stressful task. You will feel a great sense of joy upon meeting these goals instead of being disappointed that you won’t have enough pieces for the jewelry show next weekend.

Everyone deserves a fun and rewarding way to relax. Start baking, go buy a saxophone, or take up glass-blowing. Whatever your “I’d love to know how to…” or “I wish I could make…” dream is, turn it into reality. Learn how to best manage your time and set goals that are realistic and achievable. The combination of the two will help you to stay motivated as you witness your progress and gained knowledge over time. Change color with the leaves and add a new dimension to your life.

Laci Radford is an Instructor & Research Specialist at the East Columbia Branch (while her home branch, in Savage, is being renovated). She is a music lover, writer, and an avid reader. She enjoys attending concerts, plays, and other forms of live entertainment. Her favorite activities include scoping out unique items at thrift stores, bonfires with friends, and having tie-dye parties. She is studying Psychology and plans to become a music and art therapist sooner rather than later.

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Picture by Nils Thingvall (Turbidity) www.turbidwater.comThe Farmers’ Market Chef wants to be “well” and “wise” at the Farmers’ Market—and after I bring my fresh produce home! Luckily, the Glenwood Branch just had a visit from Karen Basinger, an educator with University of Maryland Extension. She taught a class on home food preservation to a group of about 14.

This is a great time of year to buy and enjoy fresh local vegetables and fruits. With good, safe food preservation practices it is possible to enjoy your produce long into the winter months. Karen was here to teach us the why and the how of canning, freezing, and drying. She explained how microorganisms that cause illness—like listeriosis and botulism—can grow if food is stored improperly. And the quality of your food will be compromised if you don’t destroy the enzymes that cause spoilage.

It’s important to use the appropriate preserving method. Low acid foods like green beans and corn require the high temperatures of a pressure canner while high acid foods like pickles can be processed in a boiling water bath. It is important to have the right equipment and to be sure it is in good working condition. At Karen’s office in Ellicott City she can test your pressure canner to assure you it is safe to use.

Maybe you don’t want to heat up your kitchen with the canning process. Freezing veggies and fruits usually requires only a quick dip in boiling water to destroy enzymes and the food is ready to chill and freeze. Be sure to use bags, boxes or wrap that is designed to keep the air out of your frozen food. You don’t want to be disappointed in January!

Drying may be the oldest method of food preservation. With a dehydrator (or your oven if you don’t mind wasting a lot of heat) you can make bright colored, chewy fruit leathers, meat jerky, dried tomatoes, and many other space-saving treats.

This is only an overview—a teaser to make you curious. To learn more, attend some of the University of Maryland Extension “Grow It, Eat It, Preserve It” workshops. The food preservation workshops are offered through the summer—if you miss this year’s watch for announcements about next year’s workshops. You can contact Karen Basinger at kbasinge@umd.edu or call 410-313-1908.

Karen also had a list of “Farmers’ Market Dos and Don’ts” – some of my favorites are:

  • Do bring a cooler with ice to help keep your produce fresh while you run your other errands

  • Do keep control of your kids and pets

  • Do go early in the day

  • Do get to know your vendors

  • Don’t sample anything that isn’t labeled as a sample

  • Don’t pinch, squeeze, drop, or peel anything you aren’t going to buy

  • Don’t buy more than you can use, and

  • Don’t forget you can always come back next week!

See you at the Farmers’ Markets!

Barbara Cornell joined the Howard County Library System in 1993 as Assistant Branch Manager at the new Elkridge Branch. Since 2000 she has enjoyed a shorter commute to the Glenwood Branch.


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