Tips for Caring for Aging Parents

Adult children caring for aging parents.

Adult children caring for aging parents. [Credit: Goldenkb] / [Dreamstime.com]

Caregiving for an aging parent can be challenging. Follow these tips to make the process easier.

Prepare for Doctor’s Visits

Older patients often have more health issues to discuss. Create an agenda and questions for the appointment. Attend appointments with your loved one, if you can, or send someone you trust, who can take notes and help remember and understand everything that was said.

Also bring all of their prescription bottles to their appointment. Elderly patients are more susceptible to side effects and interactions between medications and they often see many physicians—so bringing bottles is extremely helpful to the physician.

Organize Daily Medications

Use a pill dispenser with compartments for each day of the week or another reminder system to let your loved one know when to take medications. You can also keep a medication schedule and post it somewhere visible—the refrigerator or medicine cabinet.

Set an alarm on your loved one’s phone, watch or clock to help make taking medications a part of the daily routine.

Make a List of Medications

Maintain a list of medications—with the name of the drug, the dose, how often it is taken and why. Keep a copy somewhere immediately accessible, like your purse or car, in case there is an emergency. Schedule annual medication reviews with your loved one’s primary health care provider. Keep in mind, many common drugs can have interactions with food.

Fill Prescriptions at One Pharmacy

Using one pharmacy makes refilling prescriptions simpler and it helps your pharmacist protect against drug interactions and avoid potential problems. Some pharmacies even deliver.

Take Advantage of Technology

Many health care providers, pharmacies and insurance plans offer apps or websites to manage records. These online tools can help you retrieve and share health care information quickly. If you rely on electronic files, be sure to keep a back-up of logins and passwords. Johns Hopkins MyChart is one example—for more information, visit MyChart.

Discuss Advance Directives

Start the difficult but important conversations about end-of-life care early, when you are not in a crisis, and there is more time to think and make better decisions.

Advance directives identify who will make decisions regarding treatments, such as life support measures, when your loved one is too sick to do so themselves. The designee should have a full understanding of the patient’s wishes.

Know that you are not alone. There are many great resources for caregivers. To start, download a free copy of the Johns Hopkins guide “Take Care: A Guide for Family Caregivers.”

Anirudh Sridharan, M.D., is a board-certified geriatrician on staff at Howard County General Hospital.