Caffeine: why it’s not all perks when you have too much

caffeine side effects

[© Kjetil Kolbjornsrud | Dreamstime.com]

Do you use caffeine to help wake up in the morning or perk up in the evening? If the answer is yes, you are not alone. Millions of people use caffeine on a daily basis. According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, “caffeine is the most mood-altering drug in the world.”

On average, Americans consume about 280 milligrams of caffeine daily—about 30 milligrams alters mood and behavior and 100 milligrams can result in physical dependence. So how many cups of coffee a day is too much? The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warns that four to seven cups of coffee is too much, however, everyone can be affected differently.

If you consume too much caffeine on a daily basis, side effects can include insomnia, nervousness, irritability, upset stomach, rapid heartbeat, muscle tremors and restlessness. Those who do not consume caffeine on a regular basis may be more sensitive and experience negative effects faster. Also, factors such as age, gender (females are more prone), medications and body mass can play a role in sensitivity.

The recent buzz
In recent years, caffeine use has been on the rise, and the industry is responding to Americans’ obsession with caffeine. While caffeine was typically consumed through coffee, tea, cola beverages and chocolate, more recently, caffeine can be found in all shapes and sizes—from energy drinks and pills, to powder you can mix into food and caffeinated gum. This addiction has become increasingly easier to form.

The addition of these products to the market has dramatically impacted public health, with thousands of caffeine overdoses, addiction and, in rare instances, death. The FDA has stepped in to warn people about the risks involved with consuming too much caffeine and has also banned various new, dangerous caffeinated products.

It’s not all perks
Caffeine can also be especially dangerous to those with existing health conditions. According to the FDA, “People with heart problems shouldn’t use caffeine because it makes their hearts work too hard.” Additionally, “People with anxiety problems or panic attacks may find that caffeine makes them feel worse.”

If you are one of the many caffeinated people out there, it is important that you monitor how much caffeine is in the food and drinks you consume and listen to your body if you think you could be experiencing a reaction or withdrawal. Speak with your primary care doctor about your caffeine intake to see what is right for you.