8 Ways to Avoid Sitting Disease

sitting disease

[© Nruboc | Dreamstime.com] One way to avoid sitting all day at a desk job is to take your calls while standing up.

You Can Start By Reading This Blog Standing Up

Sitting for many hours a day is a common practice. Without realizing it, many people are falling victim to sitting disease. The American College of Cardiology defines sitting disease as being sedentary for many hours with little movement and calls it a lifestyle risk factor for cardiovascular disease, blood clots, heart attack, stroke, diabetes and a variety of other conditions.

Even those who incorporate exercise into their routine can have sitting disease. “Going to the gym three days a week to get your heart rate up is not sufficient. You actually need to incorporate movement throughout your daily routine as well,” says Kabir Yousuf, M.D., a cardiologist on staff at Howard County General Hospital. “Often people try to plan out their physical activity too much and get wrapped up with a trainer or a gym class exercise regimen instead of getting out and just moving. My philosophy is to just get up and move—the more the better. This is especially important if you have a sedentary job. Moving doesn’t have to be scheduled—every step and minute you spend doing physical activity counts and can reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease.”

Desk Jockeys: 8 Ways to Stay Fit

  • Take the stairs
  • For every hour you sit, move for five minutes. If you can’t do this every hour, do it every two hours and increase your movement to 10 minutes.
  • Instead of sitting while on the phone, stand.
  • Park further away in the parking lot to take advantage of walking.
  • Have walking meetings instead of sitting in meetings throughout the day. If you even take a quarter of your meetings outside of the conference room and walk somewhere, it is beneficial.
  • When you are at a store—instead of shopping right away—take a lap or two around the store before buying anything.
  • Get a partner or a friend to motivate you—you will be more apt to be active when you have a partner.
  • Incorporate technology—using activity trackers, websites and apps, you can track your activity and be reminded to move throughout the day.
Kabir Yousuf, M.D., is a cardiologist with Maryland Cardiovascular Specialists. To schedule an appointment, call 410-740-0549