Eating Well With Diabetes

“When it comes to eating right, I find it’s so important for food to be tasty, so that you’ll want to keep eating well for a lifetime,” so goes the opening to the super neat and scrumptious The All-Natural Diabetes Cookbook, which covers everything from classic comfort foods to more exotic fare.

all natural diabetesThere are so many good cookbooks out there, but sometimes you just want a few that you can count on again and again to provide you with you healthy (and even happy) meal choices that will never disappoint or deny you enjoyment in your eating life. Whether it is Diabetic Living’s beautiful and wonderful Diabetes Meals by the Plate: 90 Low-Carb Meals to Mix & Match, Jackie Newgent’s The All-Natural Diabetes Cookbook, or Kate Gardner’s The New Diabetes Cookbook: 100 Mouthwatering, Seasonal, Whole-Food Recipes, you will not only want to eat healthy, you will be excited about doing so!

Essential to Jackie Newgent’s philosophy is simplicity, both with time in the kitchen and in choosing the freshest, least-processed foods. One of my favorite recipes in her book is “Buckwheat Banana Pancakes with Walnuts” (page 26). I was surprised to discover that buckwheat is not wheat at all but an herb of Russian descent. Central to Newgent’s cookbook is the idea that non-starchy vegetables promote an essential (and delicious) plant-based approach and that some vegetables can become the entrée, such as yummy cauliflower “steak” (see pages 256-257) “A good rule of thumb,” the registered dietitian nurse says, is “to fill half of your plate with non-starchy vegetables, whether grilled, steamed, roasted, microwave-baked or raw.”

diabetes meals by the plate useJessie Shafer, Food and Nutrition Editor for Diabetic Living, supports the half plate non-starchy veggies “ideal” as well. In the intro to the fabulously colorful and very user friendly cookbook Diabetes Meals by The Plate she explains that the trick to healthful eating is in how you arrange your plate. “Visually divide your plate in half and fill one of those halves with nonstarchy vegetables,” she begins, then “divide the remaining half of the plate in two and fill one quarter with a protein. Fill the last quarter with a serving of grains or other starchy food.” Diabetes Meals by The Plate features dozens of pretty, but more importantly, very tasty and healthy recipes. There are lots of offerings for people who like their meat, but also (and in a very neat and unique way) there are offerings for the vegetarian and “Caribbean Tofu and Beans” (see pages 182 and 183) just jumps off the page with vibrancy and the promise of a terrific meal, even for those normally wary of tofu.

new diabetes cookbookPerhaps the most “foodie” of the cookbooks mentioned here, in terms of looks and taste, though (thankfully) not complexity, is the gorgeous (and mouthwatering) The New Diabetes Cookbook. One of my favorite recipes in the book is for “smoked gouda and broccoli lasagnettes.” (see pages 94 and 95) If you love lasagna as much as the author does then you might understand what she means when she says that one of the things she does not like about it is how easy it is to overeat it. That’s where “lasagnettes,” not lasagna, come in. Lasagnettes are mini lasagnas made in a muffin tin, where wontons are used instead of pasta, which saves on both both carbs and calories. Lasagnettes also travel very well and make for easy on-to-go snacks AND they freeze well.

Kate Gardner wrote The New Diabetes Cookbook knowing that cooking and eating well with diabetes is not always easy. There are the worries about carbohydrate content, blood sugar and making the “right” choices. All three cookbooks mentioned here focus on the belief that eating well with diabetes means eating whole, unprocessed foods in moderate portions. Jackie Newgent calls it “eating real” and makes cooking with vegetables a real joy, even to those who are not veggie lovers. Each color group provides distinctive health benefits and makes for terrific presentation in your meals as well as a tasty treat for your palate. It is the position of the American Diabetes Association that there is not “a one size fits all” pattern to eating and that is delightfully evident in all the wonderful and varied choices delivered in these three cookbooks.

Angie Engles has been with the Howard County Library System for 17 years, 14 of which were at the Savage Branch. She currently works at the Central Branch primarily in the Fiction and Audio-visual departments. Her interests include music, books, and old movies.

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