2012 CalendarSeptember 29, 9:00 a.m. Walk to End Alzheimer’s.™ Centennial Park, Pavilions A, B, C, South Entrance Route 108. Registration begins at 9:00 a.m. and the Walk starts at 10:00 a.m. The Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s™ is the nation’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Held annually in more than 600 communities nationwide, this inspiring event calls on participants of all ages and abilities to reclaim the future for millions.

September 29, 10:00 a.m.- 1:30 p.m. 9th Annual Family Health Expo. The Southeast Horizon Council will host the ninth annual Family Health Expo at the north Laurel Community Center. The event will provide access for the residents of Laurel and Savage to Howard County health and human service providers. The Expo includes free blood pressure, bone density, cholesterol, vision, hearing, glucose and other screenings. Dental professionals will be providing both adult and child dental screenings.

September 29, 2:00 p.m. Got Black Belt?. Demonstration at the Glenwood Branch by the students of Black Belt Institute in Glenelg.  Register online or by calling 410.313.5579.

September 29 and 30, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.  17th Annual Howard County Farm Heritage Days presented by the Howard County Antique Farm Machinery Club. Rain or Shine! Admission is $5 for persons age 12 and older.  Live bluegrass music, vintage farm equipment, wagon rides, tractor pulls and lots of activities for the children including pony rides and petting zoo.  Learn how to shell corn and make rope!

September 29 starting at 4:00 p.m. and September 30th starting at 2:00 p.m. Bull Blast and Rodeo Extravaganza- brought to you as part of the Farm Heritage Days. Tickets are $20 for adults and $10 for kids 4-12 at the gate. Advanced discounted tickets are available.  A portion of the proceeds benefits the Claudia Mayer Cancer Resource Center, Howard County General Hospital.

September 29. 10:00 a.m.- 2:00 p.m. National Drug Take Back Day. Drop unwanted, expired, unused medications off at one of the following locations:

  • The Bain Center in Harper’s Choice, 5470 Ruth Keeton Way, Columbia.
  • Howard County Police Northern District, 3410 Courthouse Drive, Ellicott City.
  • Howard County Police Southern District, 11226 Scaggsville, Road, Laurel.
  • Long Reach Community Policing Office, 8775 Cloudleap Court, Columbia.
  • Oakland Mills Community Policing Office, 5820 Steven’s Forest Road, Columbia.
  • Owen Brown Community Policing Office, 7154 Cradlerock Way, Columbia.
  • North Laurel Community Policing Office, 9105 #G, All Saints Road, Laurel.
  • Wilde Lake Community Policing Office, 10451 Twin Rivers Road, Columbia.

September 29, 8:00 a.m. HC DrugFree Town Hall Meeting.  As part of National Drug Take Back Day, come and enjoy a free continental breakfast at The Bain Center(5470 Ruth Keeton Way in Columbia.) Learn about the dangers of prescription drug abuse as part of The Partnership at Drugfree.org’s national campaign, “The Medicine Abuse Project”.  Adults and teens will view a short video, receive educational materials, hear from an expert panel and engage in a community discussion about prescription drug abuse. Young children will be entertained by Drug Free Charlie, a clown with an educational message

October 1, 3:30-5:30pm. Blood Pressure Screening. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring at the Glenwood Branch offered by Howard County General Hospital. 1st & 3rd. No registration required.

October 1, 7:00 p.m. Fire Safety And Prevention Month. Rich Dooley, from Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services, discusses important safety information at the Savage Branch. Register online or by calling 410.880.5980.

October 2, 10:30 a.m. Just For Me. A classes at the Glenwood Branch for children ages 3-5 who are ready for an independent class that includes creative expression, listening comprehension, and early reading skills. 30 min. Register online or by calling 410.313.5579.

October 2, 10:15 & 11:30 a.m. Baby Sign. Learn basic signs in American Sign Language at the Central Branch. Ages 6-23 months with adult; 30 min. Six-week series. No registration required.

October, 2. 11:30 a.m. Hands-only CPR. Brad Tanner, from Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services, teaches the basics of adult CPR and the warning signs for sudden cardiac arrest at the Miller Branch. He also discusses the functions of an automated external defibrillator (AED). Participants are required to practice the Hands-Only CPR method on the provided mannequins as they are assisted by the instructor. This course is intended for all ages and recommended for individuals who wish to learn the basics of CPR. Note: Hands-Only CPR is a basic course and is designed to be performed without a CPR card. As a result, a CPR card is not issued upon course completion. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

October 3, 10:15 & 11:15 a.m. Just For Me. Classes at the Elkridge Branch for children ages 3-5 who are ready for an independent class that includes creative expression, listening comprehension, and early reading skills. 30 min. No registration required.

October 3, 10:30 a.m. Excuse Me, Please & Thank You. Prepare your toddler to learn good manners and practice civility through literature, songs, and a craft at the Glenwood Branch. Ages 18-36 months with adult; 30 min. Register online or by calling 410.313.5579.

October 3, 7:00 p.m. Informed Inclusions: Cultivate Positive Relationships By Making Correct Assumptions. When we make incorrect assumptions about others, we can sabotage potential relationships. Using fun activities, executive coach and consultant Mark Sachs comes to the Central Branch to teach how to stay open and positive when nurturing new connections. Register online or by calling 410.313.7800.

October 3, 7:00 p.m. Rain Barrels And Rain Gardens. Presented by Master Gardener Carolyn Feil at the Miller Branch. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

October 4, 6:30 p.m. Mean Girls. Come to the Glenwood Branch and learn how to negotiate the social world of female friendships with expert Deborah West. Ages 11-17. Sponsored by the Horizon Foundation and the Women’s Giving Circle. Register online or by calling 410.313.5577.

October 4, 7:00 p.m. Creating A Rain Garden. Taught by Master Gardener Carolyn Feil at the Central Branch. Register online or by calling 410.313.7800.

October 4, 7:00 p.m. Ethical Behavior: Recipe For The Good Life. Author and economist Dr. Gopal Dorai explores the implications of ethical conduct for personal well-being, social cohesion, and economic growth at the Miller Branch. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

October 5, 10:15 & 11:30 a.m. Germs, Germs, Germs. Come to the East Columbia Branch to learn about hand washing – the best way to prevent colds and flu. Ages 3-5; 45 min. Tickets available at Children’s Desk 15-30 minutes before class.


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By Jean Pfefferkorn

If you are, then you’re able to go ahead and get the one-time shingles vaccine that you can receive in your local pharmacy or doctor’s office. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the shingles vaccine after you reach age 60.

You can feel good about getting this shot whether or not you have ever had shingles, the reactivation of the chicken pox virus varicella-zoster. The varicella virus stays latent in your body for the rest of your life and can be reactivated years later in advanced age or when your immune system is compromised.

The medication, Zostavax, will protect your body from reactivation of the virus. 

Shingles is a disease to be avoided! Because the virus attacks the nerve endings, the first symptom is usually one-sided pain, tingling, or burning. The pain and burning may be severe and is usually present before any rash appears. Red patches on the skin, followed by small blisters, form in most people.

The blisters break, forming small sores that begin to dry and form crusts. The crusts fall off in 2 to 3 weeks. Scarring is rare.
The rash usually involves a narrow area from the spine around to the front of the belly area or chest.
The rash may involve the face, eyes, mouth, and ears. Depending on the location of the shingles rash, the disease can develop complications including loss of hearing, long-term pain, and even blindness.

Some people do develop shingles despite vaccination; however, the shingles vaccine often reduces the severity and duration of shingles. Research has not yet established whether the vaccine reduces post-herpetic neuralgia, the severe pain that can linger long after the shingles rash has disappeared. 


The shingles vaccine is a live vaccine given as a single injection in the upper arm. Side effects of the vaccine may include redness, pain, tenderness and swelling at the injection site, and headaches. 


The shingles vaccine isn’t recommended if you:

Have ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to gelatin, the antibiotic neomycin, or any other component of the shingles vaccine
Have a weakened immune system or receive immune system-suppressing drugs, radiation, or chemotherapy
Have active, untreated tuberculosis
Are pregnant or trying to become pregnant

Jean has been working at Howard County Library System’s Central Branch for nearly nine years.

She walks in the Benjamin Banneker Park whenever she gets a chance.

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Bowling Green Farm brings delicious fresh cheese to HCGH Farmers’ Market

Mitzi and Tim Jones’ children are the tenth generation of dairy farmers to live on Bowling Green Farm, which supplies the HCGH Farmers Market with dairy products. Bowling Green Farm is one of only three privately-owned dairy farms remaining in Howard County and the Jones live on the same land as their great-great-great-great-greatgreat-grandparents! “We’re not really sure where the name Bowling Green came from. Maybe it’s because the land is so flat and green you could bowl on it,” said Mitzi Jones.

“The farm goes back to the mid-1700s,” she said, “and since it was usually the family females who kept the farm going, names changed over the years as the women married.” Currently, three generations of Joneses live on the farm. Until last February when she passed away, Tim Jones’ grandmother—the family matriarch—lived on the farm, and his mother still lives there and actively participates in farm activities.

Bowling Green cows, a total of 200, are born and bred on the farm. Cows are ready for milking at age two, and Bowling Green milks 100 cows at any given time. The cows are completely free range and the farm uses no BST hormones. A cheese maker in Pennsylvania turns their milk into fresh cheese varieties that include cheddar, tomato basil, dill, Swiss and red wine spread. Their newest flavor, smoked Gouda, andfarm-fresh butter are popular items as well.

“A really nice thing happened at the Howard County Fair this year,” Mitzi said. “A man who discovered us at a Farmers Market brought his daughters to our cheese booth and we took them to the barn to pet the cows. He said it was a great experience, and it makes me happy to show people where their food comes from.”

Bowling Green farm products will be available at the HCGH farmers’ market next on September 28 and every other Friday through the end of october.

 

Diane Dunn is a senior communications project manager in the Public Relations department at Howard County General Hospital.

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Rock Your Jeans!

Rock Your Jeans Into the New Year

Every year I look forward to the holidays. I love the crispness in the air, all the parties, the food and I love the winter break from school for the kids.

What I don’t love; however, is the almost inevitable holiday weight gain. It’s not hard to see how it happens; there’s the office parties, the holidays themselves, the baked goods you make at home to share with friends and work and family that you nibble on too, and then there’s New Year’s Eve. It is any wonder that New Year’s Resolutions are so often about losing weight? You can easily gain 10 pounds in December alone.

That’s why Columbia Association’s (CA) “Rock Your Jeans” fitness program piqued my interest. It’s an eight-week fitness program running from Oct. 15-Dec. 15. The purpose of the program is to drop two jeans sizes during those eight weeks of improved fitness and nutrition. Let me tell you why I love this concept: It’s concentrating on improving fitness, not numbers on the scale. That rocks, as improving fitness is what’s really important!

So, here’s how it works: At the start of the program, each participant will bring a pair of jeans that are two sizes too small, or an old pair of jeans that no longer fit but they hope to be able to wear after the program. A personal trainer will keep those jeans for the duration of the program. Halfway through the program, participants will try on the jeans to assess their progress and will try them on again at the end to see if their goal has been met. Hopefully, at the closing event it will mean retiring a now too big pair of jeans!

Participants work in teams of two for support, encouragement and fun for the duration of the eight-week “Rock Your Jeans” program. You can sign up with a partner or you can be paired up by the personal trainers.  A plan will be made for each team that will include fitness classes and nutritional help, and weekly personal training sessions.

Registration has already begun and will continue through Oct. 8, and can be completed at any of the three CA fitness facilities. “Rock Your Jeans” is $299 for Package Plan Plus (PPP) members, $319 for Package Plan (PP) members, $379 for CA Resident Non-Members and $399 for Non-Members.  This fee will cover all PPP classes, personal training sessions, and nutritional help.

Still not quite sure if this is for you and want to find out more? CA will be hosting a launch party with a free “Rock Your Jeans” expo on Saturday, Sept. 29, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Supreme Sports Club Arena. This event is partnered with Macy’s and will include a fashion show, a business and organization fair, fitness class demos and giveaways.

The expo will begin at 9:30 a.m. with a sampler class of things you can expect to see during the eight-week program, so be sure to bring your workout clothes! The demo class will include Mat Pilates, Zumba® Circuit, hip-hop line dancing and belly dancing. At 10:30 a.m. there will be a Tae Bo® session. The fashion show will begin at 11:30 a.m. and at 12:15 p.m. the expo will end with a Zumba® class.

To sign up for the expo, visit rock your jeans expo.eventbrite.com. For more information on “Rock Your Jeans,” call 410-381-5355 or go to ColumbiaFitness.org.

I’m seriously considering participating in this event. Last year I chose to take the month of December off from my weightloss journey; giving into the temptations instead of fighting them. That was a big mistake, as it took three months to take off the 14 pounds of holiday snacking damage. I could change that this year. If I were recently svelte, more fit and in a smaller jeans size than I have ever been in my adult years, I think I would be less tempted by sugar cookies and eggnog! What sounds better? That cookie or those smaller jeans?


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By Wendy Camassar

Happy Jewish New Year to those of you who celebrate it!  I had quite a dilemma this year: how was I going to prepare a traditional Jewish holiday meal now that my family eats a plant-based diet?  These traditional meals are ones that my family really enjoys, and I didn’t want to take that away.

My daughters’ favorite part of any holiday meal is my mother’s Matzo Ball soup, aka, “Grandma Marsha’s World Famous Matzo Ball Soup,” which is laden with huge chunks of chicken, rice or noodles, and Matzo balls the size of a soft ball but as light as a feather.  I wracked my brain over how I would be able to recreate this little piece of heaven in a bowl, without using any animal products.  So I took to the internet and started my research on the subject.

Luckily I found quite a few hits on the topic.  I looked through a bunch to find the easiest and least time-consuming ones, and came across one that looked the least complicated.  (I’m not one who likes to fuss in the kitchen for very long.)  I’m happy to report that for our Rosh Hashana dinner, we all enjoyed Matzo Ball soup, in addition to a “Meat Loaf” made out of lentils.  The soup was not quite the same as “Grandma Marsha’s,” but it was a huge hit.  You’d never know it was a fake!  Here is the the recipe I used to recreate the favorite part of our holiday meal.

So holiday traditions can still be maintained, and enjoyed, vegan style.  But even if you’re not preparing a special meal, there are many great vegan recipes to try.  If you are looking for a new Vegan cookbook, here is one I’ve recently borrowed from HCLS that I’d recommend: Chloe’s Kitchen: 125 easy, delicious recipes for making the food you really love the vegan way

Wendy Camassar is an Instruction and Research Specialist at the Central Branch of the Howard County Library System.  Prior to joining HCLS, she worked as a freelance makeup artist for several years.  She enjoys hiking with her family, exercising, reading, and organic foods and skin care products.

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2012 Calendar

This listing of upcoming classes and events appears each Friday in the Well & Wise blog.  The list includes activities sponsored by the Howard County Libarary System,  Howard County General Hospital: Johns Hopkins Medicine,   and other community groups and organizations.  Let us know if you have a Well & Wise event that you’d like us to post!

September 21, 2:00- 6:00 p.m. HCGH Farmer’s Market.  Come and pick out some fresh fruits and veggies from our Farmer’s Market.  Did you know that the products at HCGH are 100% Howard County grown or produced?

September 22, 10:00 p.m. Farmers’ Market Chef. 
Join our own Farmers’ Market Chef to find out what can you do with a squash? Register online or by calling 410.313.557

September 24, 7:00 p.m. Feeding The Family. Help your children and teens make healthy food and fitness choices. Presented at the Milller Branch by Becky Ramsing, a registered dietitian from the University of Maryland Extension. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

September 26, 7:00 p.m. Herbalicious. 
Come to the Miller Branch to learn recipes to use garden herbs in salad dressings, dry rubs, and bath salts. Learn about freezing vs. drying. It’ll be an herb-tastic time! Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

September 26, 7:00 p.m. Knee Pain And Injury Prevention. Physical therapist Leigh A. Roberts comes to the Savage Branch to discussesthe causes and prevention of knee pain and injuries.  Register online or by calling 410.880.5980.

September 27, 7:00 p.m. Babysitting 101. A University of Maryland Extension-Howard County 4-H Program instructor teaches child safety, first aid, and about transitioning a child to bedtime at the Glenwood Branch. Participants receive a certificate. Ages 13 and up. Please plan to attend all three sessions: Sep 13, 20 & 27. Register online or by calling 410.313.5577.

September 27, 7:00 p.m. Family Zumba. CA fitness instructors lead an interactive workout at the Miller Branch that feels more like a party! Zumba© uses Latin and international music to drive a fun and effective dance workout. Ages 5 & up with adult; 45 – 60 min. Registration required. Signed release form required to attend. Click here to download the release form for a child or teen under 18 years old. Click here to download the release form for adults 18 or older. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

September 29, 9:00 a.m. Walk to End Alzheimer’s.™ Centennial Park, Pavilions A, B, C, South Entrance Route 108. Registration begins at 9:00 a.m. and the Walk starts at 10:00 a.m. The Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s™ is the nation’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Held annually in more than 600 communities nationwide, this inspiring event calls on participants of all ages and abilities to reclaim the future for millions.

September 29, 10:00 a.m.- 1:30 p.m. 9th Annual Family Health Expo. The Southeast Horizon Council will host the ninth annual Family Health Expo at the north Laurel Community Center. The event will provide access for the residents of Laurel and Savage to Howard County health and human service providers. The Expo includes free blood pressure, bone density, cholesterol, vision, hearing, glucose and other screenings. Dental professionals will be providing both adult and child dental screenings.

September 29 and 30, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.  17th Annual Howard County Farm Heritage Days presented by the Howard County Antique Farm Machinery Club. Rain or Shine! Admission is $5 for persons age 12 and older.  Live bluegrass music, vintage farm equipment, wagon rides, tractor pulls and lots of activities for the children including pony rides and petting zoo.  Learn how to shell corn and make rope!

September 29 starting at 4:00 p.m. and September 30th starting at 2:00 p.m. Bull Blast and Rodeo Extravaganza- brought to you as part of the Farm Heritage Days. Tickets are $20 for adults and $10 for kids 4-12 at the gate. Advanced discounted tickets are available.  A portion of the proceeds benefits the Claudia Mayer Cancer Resource Center, Howard County General Hospital.

September 29. 10:00 a.m.- 2:00 p.m. National Drug Take Back Day. Drop unwanted, expired, unused medications off at one of the following locations:

  • The Bain Center in Harper’s Choice, 5470 Ruth Keeton Way, Columbia.
  • Howard County Police Northern District, 3410 Courthouse Drive, Ellicott City.
  • Howard County Police Southern District, 11226 Scaggsville, Road, Laurel.
  • Long Reach Community Policing Office, 8775 Cloudleap Court, Columbia.
  • Oakland Mills Community Policing Office, 5820 Steven’s Forest Road, Columbia.
  • Owen Brown Community Policing Office, 7154 Cradlerock Way, Columbia.
  • North Laurel Community Policing Office, 9105 #G, All Saints Road, Laurel.
  • Wilde Lake Community Policing Office, 10451 Twin Rivers Road, Columbia.

September 29, 8:00 a.m. HC DrugFree Town Hall Meeting.  As part of National Drug Take Back Day, come and enjoy a free continental breakfast at The Bain Center(5470 Ruth Keeton Way in Columbia.) Learn about the dangers of prescription drug abuse as part of The Partnership at Drugfree.org’s national campaign, “The Medicine Abuse Project”.  Adults and teens will view a short video, receive educational materials, hear from an expert panel and engage in a community discussion about prescription drug abuse. Young children will be entertained by Drug Free Charlie, a clown with an educational message


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By Jason Pasquet

Last time, I introduced some of the basic ideas behind NLP, and shared a small exercise for you to participate in. This time, I’m going to shift the focus to how it applies to motivation.

Stated as one of the most motivating fundamental core “presuppositions” in NLP philosophy is: “There is no such thing as failure, only feedback.” This encourages us to believe and view our mistakes not as insurmountable obstacles, but as opportunities for deeper self-introspection and for greater progress in the direction we want to go. Our “feedback” gets its shape by two additional presuppositions that combine to embody the heart of NLP: “Experience has a structure” and “The map is not the territory.”

To further illustrate, the clarity of our experiences can be traced to the structure of how our neurological system classifies them. We understand our world through the five senses or modalities of touch, sight, hearing, taste, and smell, which underlie our sensory experiences. These experiences create our inner representations of the world around us, giving us our unique “map” of the territory so to speak. This map is entirely subjective; it is one’s own interpretation of the territory, not the actual territory itself. Which explains why people have unique ways of behaving to similar information received from the senses, i.e., two people eat a bowl of chicken soup, and one enjoys it, while to the other it is appalling to taste.

When you get the time, read this Wikipedia article on “Representational Systems”; it will help to outline a basic NLP understanding of the way information is stored, recognized, and given reference in our lives. Then, if you’re curious enough to have gotten this far, I’ll show you a way you can change the inner representation of these systems for increased motivation.

Picture courtesy of Life’s Too Good

In this day and age, the need for healthy “motivation” is absolutely essential for successful progression in areas involving personal growth, the development of relationships, as well as important fields of professional involvement.

Motivation can be simply defined as action in response to intrinsic and/or extrinsic stimuli. Intrinsic stimuli involve internal factors, such as our hunger, needs, wants, or desires that motivate us. Extrinsic motivation is based on an external reward system, an example being “carrots and sticks” or something outside ourselves as a stimulus to action. Our responses, our choices that we make are due to these internal or external stimuli, which are the bases that propel us to action. The well-known “emotional roller coaster” experience and lack of direction, initiative, and confidence can be traced back as direct symptoms of conflicting motivational factors.

These are important signals telling us to evaluate ourselves and to face the issues. They’re telling us specifically to get in touch with ourselves, but most of the time we don’t. Even though we sometimes know that we should change for the better, the desire for even trying to change is absent, leaving us feeling victimized by circumstances and ultimately giving us a lost sense of control in life.

I know that most people can all relate to this. I’ve personally understood from family, friends, and from my experiences how frustrating this can be. There is hope. You have all the resources you need to change, and one of the remarkable things NLP gives is more choice to choose from. The limitation you’re experiencing is in your “map,” not the territory, and the map can be changed. You can get the desire back!

In taking a deeper look at our representational systems, we discover that within each modality there is a more complex array of distinctions known as “Submodalities”. They are the essence of how we code our experiences and the key to the choices we can make to change any unpleasant memories and improve our future outlooks. The only way you can truly and fully understand submodalities is by repeated personal experience. This helps to get in touch with the ones matching to your specific representational preferences for each system.

After you’ve read and understood what constitutes these smaller features, and the language that is used to describe them, you can attempt the exercise “Basic Motivation Strategy” outlined by Robert Dilts. This will identify and help you to adjust your specific submodalities through visualization on the outcomes you desire for boosting your motivation. For other NLP motivational insights, in NLP, The New Technology of Achievement by Steve Andreas and Charles Faulkner, there is a significant chapter on motivation which clearly expresses the different types of motivational direction we go through. And also describes other factors involved in motivation, like our values and inspirations. They also give a great introduction to those who would like more information on how NLP psychology works.

I hope you will continue to enjoy getting and staying motivated with NLP!

Jason Pasquet is a Customer Service Specialist for Howard County Library System.

He is aspiring in the fields of psychology, life-coaching, NLP therapy, and counseling.

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by Barbara Cornell

Is it too late to grill?  I certainly hope not.  I’ve just found several great books on grilling that include recipes showing how to give vegetables that “flame-kissed” taste.

Apparently you can grill any season of the year.  So says Rick Browne in Grilling for all Seasons, 2009  The host of PBS’s Barbecue America divides his book into Spring, Summer, Fall, and Winter chapters.  In every chapter he includes some vegetable recipes, including “Acorn squash with maple syrup” that is going to help me use some squash!  Browne even makes cheesecake in the grill.

Fast, Fresh & Green by Susie Middleton, 2010, is a vegetable cookery book that is divided by cooking method.  Sure enough there is a chapter on grilling.  I think the best thing is that it is tucked into a beautifully formatted and photographed book with lots of other ways to prepare veggies.

Looking for a celebrity endorsement?  Emeril at the Grill: A Cookbook for All Seasons, 2009, is one of Emeril Lagasse’s many cookbooks. Some of his recipes that include vegetables don’t require grilling them, but they are always welcome as sides.  I especially like his advice to try to get your produce and other ingredients locally if possible.

Bobby Flay has been a restaurateur since he opened Mesa Grill in 1991.  Since then he has published at least 8 books and has hosted numerous shows for the Food Network.  Bobby Flay’s Grill It, 2008, is organized by main ingredient because, as he says, you’ll probably be thinking “I want to do chicken breasts and maybe some summer squash” and not “I want to grill a main course tonight…”  He has a chapter on “Squash and Eggplant” together because “methods for preparing them are quite similar.”  He also does chapters on Asparagus, Corn, Potatoes, and Fruit.

I love Better Homes and Gardens’ Grill it! Secrets to Delicious Flame-kissed Food, 2011, for its step-by-step photography.  They certainly make the finished dishes look wonderful.  They also start with a great section on “Grilling Basics” explaining types of grills, tools, rubs, & sauces.  Recipes include mashed grilled potatoes and several salads that start with grilled vegetables.

I think I saved the best for last–Weber’s Time to Grill by Jamie Purviance, 2011.  You may not be using a Weber grill—it doesn’t really matter!  They’ll take you to “prep school” to show you how to prepare ingredients, how to sharpen a knife, and how to test for doneness.  I also like the sidebar-like, two-page spreads on topics like smoke, propane, and how charcoal is made.  But my favorite feature is that recipes come in sets.  Two recipes with similar ingredients occupy opposite sides of a two-page spread, the left page is an easy recipe and the right is a similar but more adventurous dish.  For example: easy Eggplant and Tomato Salad; and adventurous Eggplant Parmesan.

My goal was to find some creative recipes for some winter squash that I will be showing off at my September 22 Farmers’ Market Chef demonstration at the Glenwood Branch.  We’ll all talk and compare notes from 10 til 11:30.  Hope you can come!  I have recipes!

Barbara Cornell joined the Howard County Library System in 1993 as Assistant Branch Manager at the new Elkridge Branch.

Since 2000 she has enjoyed a shorter commute to the Glenwood Branch.

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2012 Calendar

This listing of upcoming classes and events appears each Friday in the Well & Wise blog.  The list includes activities sponsored by the Howard County Libarary System,  Howard County General Hospital: Johns Hopkins Medicine,   and other community groups and organizations.  Let us know if you have a Well & Wise event that you’d like us to post!

Ongoing Through September 15. Guilford Elementary Book Drive. The Community of Monarch Mills in Columbia is hosting a book drive to benefit, Guilford Elementary. They are looking for gently used picture and chapter books for ages 4-10. Books can be dropped off the Monarch Mills Clubhouse sitting room. The drive ends September 15. The flyer can be found here.

September 14, 2:00- 6:00 p.mHCGH Farmer’s Market.  Come and pick out some fresh fruits and veggies from our Farmer’s Market.  Did you know that the products at HCGH are 100% Howard County grown or produced? Eating local is the well & wise way to go!

September 15, 9:30 a.m. Columbia BikeAbout. Did you know bicycling has been linked to improved mental health? Come exercise your mind and body at the 12th annual Columbia BikeAbout on Saturday, September 15, starting between 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. at the Downtown Columbia Lakefront

September 15, 3:00 p.m. Herbal Apothecary. Join Master Gardener Anne Roy at the Miller Branch for a brief look at plants and their uses for medicines, perfumes, cooking, and flavorings. Visit the garden to experience many of the plants. Ages 9-12; 30 – 60 min. Registration and signed release form required. Click here to download release form. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

September 17, 10:00- 11:30 a.m. Medicare 101: What You Can Expect From Medicare. Do you have Medicare or will you have it soon? Do you provide care to someone covered by Medicare? This free presentation will review Original Medicare (Part A Hospital and Part B Medical) and Prescription Drug Coverage (Part D). You will learn about the benefits of Medicare, your costs and how the plan works. Sponsored by the Senior Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP) and the Howard County Office on Aging at the Wellness Center, Howard County General Hospital, Johns Hopkins Medicine. Free, but registration is required.

September 17, 11:00 a.m. Hi Tech Choose Civility iBook Project. Collaborate with your friends to create an ibook at the Savage Branch. In preparation for the class, please write a personal statement, poem, or story. The written piece should be no more than 800 words and focus on one of the following topics: (a) importance of being civil, (b) ways to stop bullying, (c) inspirational message for those going through a tough time, (d) how to make the world a better place. You may bring original pictures and photos that best depict your written document. Key concepts for Choose Civility are on the choosecivility.org website at the link “About Us.” At the end of the session, students will have a completed ibook. Ages 11-18. HiTech is funded by a Federal STEM grant from IMLS and the MacArthur Foundation.  Register online or by calling 410.880.5980.

September 17, 11:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Just For Me. A class at the Savage Branch for children ages 3-5 who are ready for an independent class that includes creative expression, listening comprehension, and early reading skills. No registration required.

September 17, 2:00 p.m. Worms At Work. Join Master Gardener Alex Dunbar at the Central Branch to explore an indoor worm bin, learn about worms and how they help plants grow, and discuss different ways of dealing with trash and garbage. Ages 5-12; 60 min. Ho. Co. schools closed. Register online or by calling 410.313.7880.

September 17, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Blood Pressure. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring at the Glenwood Branch offered by Howard County General Hospital. 1st & 3rd Mondays. No registration required.

September 17, 7:00 p.m. College Application Essay Class. Jill Kasprzak, director of college counseling at a private high school and former assistant director of admissions at Loyola University Maryland, discusses the art of the college application essay at the Central Branch. She provides helpful information about what college admissions officers are seeking, what makes an essay successful, how to brainstorm, and how to complete the essays without stressing out. Ages 11-17. Register online or by calling 410.313.7800.

September 17, 7:00 p.m. Hands-only CPR. Brad Tanner, from Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services, comes to the Elkridge Branch to teach the basics of adult CPR and the warning signs for sudden cardiac arrest. He also discusses the functions of an automated external defibrillator (AED). Participants are required to practice the Hands-Only CPR method on the provided mannequins as they are assisted by the instructor. This course is intended for all ages and recommended for individuals who wish to learn the basics of CPR.Note: Hands-Only CPR is a basic course and is designed to be performed without a CPR card. As a result, a CPR card is not issued upon course completion. Register online or by calling 410.313.5088.

September 18, 7:00 p.m. Herb Harvest. Learn about the different herbs planted in the Enchanted Garden at the Miller Branch, then plant and take home two or three of your favorites. Ages 11-17. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

September 18, 7:00 p.m. Urbanized. Discover the issues and strategies that affect cities as this eye-opening documentary, shown at the East Columbia Branch, explores urban design projects from around the world.Hear from some of the world’s foremost architects, policymakers, builders, and thinkers. Learn about the challenges of balancing housing, mobility, public space, civic engagement, economic development, and environmental policy. Discussion follows. In partnership with the Columbia Association. Register online or by calling 410.313.7700.

September 19, 10:15 & 11:15 a.m. at Elkridge, and 10:30 a.m. at Glenwood. Just For Me. Classes at the Elkridge and Glenwood Branches for children ages 3-5 who are ready for an independent class that includes creative expression, listening comprehension, and early reading skills. 30 min. No registration required for Elkridge; Register online or by calling 410.313.5579 for Glenwood.

September 19, 10:30-11:00 a.m. Mini Milestones. Come to the Glenwood Branch to prepare your toddler as you learn about some mini milestones. Ages 18-36 months with adult. Register online or by calling 410.313.5579.

September 19, 2:00 p.m. The Future Of Health Care Delivery. Dr. Stephen Schimpf comes to the Miller Branch to discuss his new book, The Future of Health Care Delivery: Why it Must Change and How it Will Affect You. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

September 19, 6:00- 8:00 p.m. Mammograms: Best Practices for Women for Healthier Exams. Learn ways women can live a prevention-focused lifestyle and promote their breast health. Discussion will include genetics, fact versus fiction risks as well as what to do if asked to return for further follow-up at the Wellness Center, Howard County General Hospital, Johns Hopkins Medicine. Light refreshments will be served. Free, but registration is required.

September 20, 6:00 p.m. Babysitting 101. A University of Maryland Extension-Howard County 4-H Program instructor teaches child safety, first aid, and about transitioning a child to bedtime at the Glenwood Branch. Participants receive a certificate. Ages 13 and up. Please plan to attend all three sessions: Sep 13, 20 & 27. Register online or by calling 410.313.5577.

September 20, 7:00 p.m. Insectigations: Seed Dispersers. Maryland Master Naturalist Natalie Brewer comes to the Miller branch to teach all about insects and the jobs they do. Learn how insects help plants by dispersing their seeds. Visit the Enchanted Garden, weather permitting. Ages 7-10; 45 min. Registration and signed release form required. Click here to download release form. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

September 20, 7:00 p.m. The Mind Of Leonardo Da Vinci. Leonardo da Vinci, creator of some of the world’s most famous paintings, was also a brilliant scientist and engineer. Dr. Jonathan Pevsner comes to the Miller Branch to explore Leonardo’s remarkable life to try to understand the nature of his creativity and his integrative approach to the arts and sciences. Dr. Pevsner’s laboratory studies the genetics of childhood brain disorders, including autism. He has received multiple teaching awards and wrote a textbook, Bioinformatics and Functional Genomics (2009). Dr. Pevsner harbors a passionate interest in the work of Leonardo. His personal collection includes some 700 books on him, he has written articles on Leonardo’s neuroscience, and he has served as a Leonardo expert on History Channel and Discovery Channel television shows.

September 21, 2:00- 6:00 p.m. HCGH Farmer’s Market.  Come and pick out some fresh fruits and veggies from our Farmer’s Market.  Did you know that the products at HCGH are 100% Howard County grown or produced?

September 29, 9:00 a.m. Walk to End Alzheimer’s.™ Centennial Park, Pavilions A, B, C, South Entrance Route 108. Registration begins at 9:00 a.m. and the Walk starts at 10:00 a.m. The Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s™ is the nation’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Held annually in more than 600 communities nationwide, this inspiring event calls on participants of all ages and abilities to reclaim the future for millions.

September 29, 10:00 a.m.- 1:30 p.m. 9th Annual Family Health Expo. The Southeast Horizon Council will host the ninth annual Family Health Expo at the north Laurel Community Center. The event will provide access for the residents of Laurel and Savage to Howard County health and human service providers. The Expo includes free blood pressure, bone density, cholesterol, vision, hearing, glucose and other screenings. Dental professionals will be providing both adult and child dental screenings.

September 29 and 30, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.  17th Annual Howard County Farm Heritage Days presented by the Howard County Antique Farm Machinery Club. Rain or Shine! Admission is $5 for persons age 12 and older.  Live bluegrass music, vintage farm equipment, wagon rides, tractor pulls and lots of activities for the children including pony rides and petting zoo.  Learn how to shell corn and make rope!

September 29 starting at 4:00 p.m. and September 30th starting at 2:00 p.m. Bull Blast and Rodeo Extravaganza- brought to you as part of the Farm Heritage Days. Tickets are $20 for adults and $10 for kids 4-12 at the gate. Advanced discounted tickets are available.  A portion of the proceeds benefits the Claudia Mayer Cancer Resource Center, Howard County General Hospital.

September 29. 10:00 a.m.- 2:00 p.m. National Drug Take Back Day. Drop unwanted, expired, unused medications off at one of the following locations:

  • The Bain Center in Harper’s Choice, 5470 Ruth Keeton Way, Columbia.
  • Howard County Police Northern District, 3410 Courthouse Drive, Ellicott City.
  • Howard County Police Southern District, 11226 Scaggsville, Road, Laurel.
  • Long Reach Community Policing Office, 8775 Cloudleap Court, Columbia.
  • Oakland Mills Community Policing Office, 5820 Steven’s Forest Road, Columbia.
  • Owen Brown Community Policing Office, 7154 Cradlerock Way, Columbia.
  • North Laurel Community Policing Office, 9105 #G, All Saints Road, Laurel.
  • Wilde Lake Community Policing Office, 10451 Twin Rivers Road, Columbia.

September 29, 8:00 a.m. HC DrugFree Town Hall Meeting.  As part of National Drug Take Back Day, come and enjoy a free continental breakfast at The Bain Center(5470 Ruth Keeton Way in Columbia.) Learn about the dangers of prescription drug abuse as part of The Partnership at Drugfree.org’s national campaign, “The Medicine Abuse Project”.  Adults and teens will view a short video, receive educational materials, hear from an expert panel and engage in a community discussion about prescription drug abuse. Young children will be entertained by Drug Free Charlie, a clown with an educational message.

 


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By Cherise Tasker

It is simply impossible that my son was born yesterday afternoon and this morning I am driving him to college.  How can I support – emotionally, financially, physically – his new experiences when I have my own concerns?  I miss him, want to give him a hug, wish I could hear his voice.

My son’s school recommended two books to help with this time of upheaval:  Letting Go:  A Parent’s Guide to Understanding the College Years by Karen Levin Coburn and Madge Lawrence Treeger and The Parents We Mean To Be:  How Well-Intentioned Adults Undermine Children’s Moral and Emotional Development by Richard Weissbourd.  Letting Go spans the period from the application process to graduation from college.  The Parents We Mean To Be discusses parents’ role in children’s moral development from childhood through young adulthood.

Both books describe situations that many of us who have recently sent kids off to school understand.  How we handle this transition for ourselves provides a role model for our children.  My son and I are both learning to manage change, even if the components of that change are different for each of us.  I can set an example by how I act now and by being honest with him, when needed, about what being a new college student was like for me.  Weissbourd advises that we “speak authentically and with integrity” to our children.

Parents of freshman should be prepared to feel both nostalgia and excitement.  We may feel emotional at unpredictable moments.  Because the college schedule is so different than our own, we have to confront the reality of being out of sync with our students’ new world.  Parents must acknowledge that their kids will have many experiences they will not describe to family at home.

Friends, family and neighbors can provide the companionship and shared experience to help navigate this potentially emotional time for parents.  Just as when we were raising our children, we parents should maintain and grow adult relationships even when it feels like we are too busy.  Some parents may feel anxious, lonely and fearful of separation. We may be jealous of our child’s experiences and wish we could take classes, meet new people, or live in such an exciting place.  Many of us wonder if our children can do well without us.  If my son succeeds does that mean I am a good parent or does it mean I am no longer needed?  If my daughter struggles, does it mean I was not a good enough parent and will I know what to do to help now?

Soon it will be time for parents’ weekends and breaks at home.  We are excited to see our student, but, in many ways, the visits will have some of the emotions of the original departure for college.  Our kids will again be asserting their independence, acclimating to disruption in their schedules, negotiating time spent with friends and family.  This is another opportunity for parents to acknowledge change and not have expectations that everything can be planned or that family rituals will be the same as when their children were younger.  Parents need to be prepared that their student may now view college as “home.”  Coburn and Treeger recommend that parents and kids respect each other and maintain their sense of humor.  Parents who understand that their relationships with their children will evolve and change are better equipped to accept that their children have their own values and their own lives. This, of course, is sometimes easier said (or blogged) than done.  So check back next month for some more transitions tips.

Cherise Tasker is a new member of the Central Branch team. She is an Instructor & Research Specialist who will be coordinating the Homebound Books services. Cherise is excited to be joining HCLS after working in the field of health information technology.

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Being Schooled in Medicare

If you are like me, your eyes glaze over when Medicare is mentioned in the news.  I know I should learn more about it.  I’m still pretty far away from using it myself, but planning for my future should include more than projecting my income and savings, it should include projecting my future expenses, shouldn’t it?  Besides, my parents use Medicare, and it would be a good idea to understand what the heck Part A, Part B and Part D have to do with medical costs and reimbursement. (And what exactly is a Single Payer Health Care Plan as opposed to Medicare Advantage?) 

A quick search turns up the alarming statistics that the typical senior household has $66,900 in savings, and the average man needs $124,000 to cover health care during retirement. (The average woman needs $152,000- not because we’re weaker, but because of that whole life expectancy thing.)  Those are startling statistics!

Recently, my out-of-state aunt fell and broke her hip and had to be transferred to a facility that could provide the skilled care needed to get her back on her feet, but, because she stayed only 2 and one-half days in the hospital, Medicare could not cover the cost of that two week nursing home stay.  Unfortunately, the family learned about the rule the hard way.

How can we make what seems to be an incredibly complex system easier to understand?  The Senior Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP), the Howard County Office on Aging and Howard County General Hospital are hosting a free two-part lecture on the Medicare system.  What to Expect From Medicare is the first seminar on September 17, and will address the benefits, costs and how the plan works.  On October 1, Medicare Isn’t Enough will focus on the gaps in Medicare and how to protect yourself from Medicare fraud.  Although the classes are free, you’ll need to register as space is limited.

If you can’t make the free seminars, be sure to check in with SHIP directly as they are a terrific resource and, for a little light reading, check out this book currently on the shelves at the Howard County Library: Social Security, Medicare & Government Pensions: Get the Most Out of Your Retirement & Medical Benefits by J. L. Matthews. It was published in 2012 and is highly rated. 

After all, being wise is an essential part of being well!

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Mary Catherine Cochran works as a Senior Communications Project Manager at Howard County General Hospital: Johns Hopkins Medicine where, among other things, she manages and writes for the Well & Wise blog.

 


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Finding a good babysitter is tricky. Parents want to trust their kids to the best care they can find, but most professionally run places are not open either in the evening or on weekends, or they cost a great deal of money. For many parents, the most convenient and easiest option is finding a neighborhood teen. But parents would be happier if they knew they were leaving their little ones in the hands of someone with a bit of training.

Learning to be a good babysitter is tricky.  For many teens, babysitting is a first employment experience.  The may not know what to do if an emergency or even just an unfamiliar situation occurs.

Fear not parents and potential babysitters, there are resources.  First, Howard County Library System is offering a class on September 13, 6:00pm at the Glenwood Branch,  Babysitting 101. A University of Maryland Extension-Howard County 4-H Program instructor teaches child safety, first aid, and about transitioning a child to bedtime. The class is available for people ages 13 and up. Participants should plan to attend all three sessions: Sep 13, 20 & 27. They can  register online or by calling 410.313.5577.

Howard County General Hospital also offers regular babysitting classes, but they fill up fast. Here are some upcoming classes that still have some slots available, and it is useful to regularly check their class listings:

Home Sweet Home, 11/3, 9–11 a.m. Free.

Is your child almost ready to stay home alone?  What do you need to do to make it a safe environment?  What does your child need to learn before he can be left alone? This free course for parents and children ages 8-12 will teach safe and fun ways for children to stay at home alone.  Please be sure to register your children individually.

 Essentials in Babysitting, 11/17, 9 a.m.–1 p.m. $50 includes lunch.

Are you ready to be a babysitter?  Learn the skills and knowledge necessary to become a responsible babysitter including how to effectively manage children, create a safe environment and apply basic emergency techniques. Marketing tips and age-appropriate activities for children will also be discussed.  For children ages 11-13. Lunch will be provided.

Similar classes are also offered throughout the community in places such as village centers and local schools.  Check the Columbia Patch (or the Patch of of your community). There are also some good babysitter guides and manuals available through the library.


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2012 Calendar

Ongoing Through September 15. Guilford Elementary Book Drive. The Community of Monarch Mills in Columbia is hosting a book drive to benefit its neighbor, Guilford Elementary and they thought the readers of Well & Wise would be a good resource for book donations. They are   ooking for gently used picture and chapter books for ages 4-10. Books can be dropped off the Monarch Mills Clubhouse sitting room. The drive ends September 15. The flyer can be found here.

September 7, 2:00- 6:00 p.m. HCGH Farmer’s Market.  Come and pick out some fresh fruits and veggies from our Farmer’s Market.  Did you know that the products at HCGH are 100% Howard County grown or produced? Eating your greens is the well & wise way to go!

September 8, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Ask A Master Gardener. Discuss gardening questions and concerns at the Glenwood and Miller Branches. No registration required. Offered again at on September 10 at 7 p.m. at the Miller Branch.

September 8, 11:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Healthy Kids in Healthy Families Clinic at the Lord & Taylor Court in the Mall in Columbia. Bring your family for pediatric vision, asthma, height, weight and blood pressure screenings. Ask a pediatrician questions and learn about healthy nutrition and other tips for the whole family. It’s the well & wise thing to do! Registration not required!

September 8, 10:00 a.m. Wonder Walk: Geocaching: Find Hidden Treasures on the Trail. Can you Geocache? Learn the trendy new tech-version of orienteering. Come as a family to participate in a challenging and exciting “scavenger” hunt, looking for natures’ bounty in the woods using a handheld GPS. Volunteer naturalists will assist you in learning to use this fun device that the Conservancy currently uses in its middle and high school programs. Please sign up in advance. In case of rain, check website. Free.

September 8, 10:00-11:30 a.m. and 1:00- 2:30 p.m. Pooches’ Pool Party. Wrap up the “Dog Days” of summer with this annual canine-only swim event. Pooches and their human pals are invited to paddle and play before the pool is closed for the summer. The County’s dog park/off-leash rules apply and all dog handlers must be at least 18 years old.  To register for the event call 410 313-PARK. $10.00 per dog.

September 9, 8:30 a.m. Centennial Park. Police Pace. Join members of the Howard County Police Department and Police Foundation for the 21st Annual 5K race and 1 mile fun walk/run.  There will be children’s activities, including face painting and balloons, and police displays including motorcycles, police K9s and the SWAT team and more. Participants receive a race t-shirt.

September 9, 10:00 a.m.- 3:00 p.m. Second Sunday Market in Historic Ellicott City. Fresh produce and baked breads and cheeses and much, much more behind the Little French Market.

September 10, 11:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Just For Me. A class at the Savage Branch for children ages 3-5 who are ready for an independent class that includes creative expression, listening comprehension, and early reading skills. No registration required.

September 10, 12:30 – 3:00 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring at the Savage Branch offered by Howard County General Hospital. No registration required.

September 10, 7:00 p.m. Checking Out The Green: Miller Branch “LEEDs” The Way. LEED Accredited Professional Jeffrey Williams teaches about green building attributes and the innovative and sustainable features of Miller Branch. Jeffrey Williams is a LEED-AP volunteer at the Robinson Nature Center and a working professional in the sustainability field. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

September 11, 10:15 & 11:30 a.m. Baby Sign. Come to the Central Branch to learn basic signs in American Sign Language. Ages 6-23 months with adult; 30 min. Six-week series. No registration required.

September 11, 7:00 p.m. Late Season Gardening. Master Gardener Kent Phillips comes to the Glenwood Branch to teach how to prepare your garden for next spring. Learn tips for sowing cover crops in fallow areas. Register online or by calling 410.313.5577.

September 12, 10:15 & 11:15 a.m. Just For Me. A class at the Elkridge Branch for children ages 3-5 who are ready for an independent class that includes creative expression, listening comprehension, and early reading skills. 30 min. No registration required.

September 12, 10:30-11:00 a.m. Mini Milestones. Come to the Glenwood Branch to prepare your toddler as you learn about some mini milestones. Ages 18-36 months with adult. Register online or by calling 410.313.5579.

September 12, 7:00 p.m. The Elbow’s Connected to the Arm Bone. Severe pain in the elbow joint can really limit daily activities Learn about tennis elbow, nerve compression, fractures, arthritis, and medical and surgical treatment options. Presented by orthopedic specialist Khurram Pervaiz, M.D. at the Wellness Center, Howard County General Hospital, Johns Hopkins Medicine. Free, but registration is required.

September 13, 6:00 p.m. Babysitting 101. A University of Maryland Extension-Howard County 4-H Program instructor teaches child safety, first aid, and about transitioning a child to bedtime at the Glenwood Branch. Participants receive a certificate. Ages 13 and up. Please plan to attend all three sessions: Sep 13, 20 & 27. Register online or by calling 410.313.5577.

September 14, 2:00- 6:00 p.mHCGH Farmer’s Market.  Come and pick out some fresh fruits and veggies from our Farmer’s Market.  Did you know that the products at HCGH are 100% Howard County grown or produced? Eating local is the well & wise way to go!

September 15, 9:30 a.m. Columbia BikeAbout. Did you know bicycling has been linked to improved mental health? Come exercise your mind and body at the 12th annual Columbia BikeAbout on Saturday, September 15, starting between 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. at the Downtown Columbia Lakefront

September 17, 10:00- 11:30 a.m. Medicare 101: What You Can Expect From Medicare. Do you have Medicare or will you have it soon? Do you provide care to someone covered by Medicare? This free presentation will review Original Medicare (Part A Hospital and Part B Medical) and Prescription Drug Coverage (Part D). You will learn about the benefits of Medicare, your costs and how the plan works. Sponsored by the Senior Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP) and the Howard County Office on Aging at the Wellness Center, Howard County General Hospital, Johns Hopkins Medicine. Free, but registration is required.

September 19, 6:00- 8:00 p.m. Mammograms: Best Practices for Women for Healthier Exams. Learn ways women can live a prevention-focused lifestyle and promote their breast health. Discussion will include genetics, fact versus fiction risks as well as what to do if asked to return for further follow-up at the Wellness Center, Howard County General Hospital, Johns Hopkins Medicine. Light refreshments will be served. Free, but registration is required.

September 21, 2:00- 6:00 p.m. HCGH Farmer’s Market.  Come and pick out some fresh fruits and veggies from our Farmer’s Market.  Did you know that the products at HCGH are 100% Howard County grown or produced?

September 29, 9:00 a.m. Walk to End Alzheimer’s.™ Centennial Park, Pavilions A, B, C, South Entrance Route 108. Registration begins at 9:00 a.m. and the Walk starts at 10:00 a.m. The Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s™ is the nation’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Held annually in more than 600 communities nationwide, this inspiring event calls on participants of all ages and abilities to reclaim the future for millions.

September 29, 10:00 a.m.- 1:30 p.m. 9th Annual Family Health Expo. The Southeast Horizon Council will host the ninth annual Family Health Expo at the north Laurel Community Center. The event will provide access for the residents of Laurel and Savage to Howard County health and human service providers. The Expo includes free blood pressure, bone density, cholesterol, vision, hearing, glucose and other screenings. Dental professionals will be providing both adult and child dental screenings.

September 29 and 30, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.  17th Annual Howard County Farm Heritage Days presented by the Howard County Antique Farm Machinery Club. Rain or Shine! Admission is $5 for persons age 12 and older.  Live bluegrass music, vintage farm equipment, wagon rides, tractor pulls and lots of activities for the children including pony rides and petting zoo.  Learn how to shell corn and make rope!

September 29 starting at 4:00 p.m. and September 30th starting at 2:00 p.m. Bull Blast and Rodeo Extravaganza- brought to you as part of the Farm Heritage Days. Tickets are $20 for adults and $10 for kids 4-12 at the gate. Advanced discounted tickets are available.  A portion of the proceeds benefits the Claudia Mayer Cancer Resource Center, Howard County General Hospital.

 


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Did you know bicycling has been linked to improved mental health? Come exercise your mind and body at the 12th annual Columbia BikeAbout on Saturday, September 15, starting between 9:30 and 10:30 a.m. at the Downtown Columbia Lakefront.

BikeAbout is a 13-mile, history-filled journey through Columbia. Participants will experience a self-paced ride that uses Columbia’s pathways and street connections where necessary.

Features on this year’s BikeAbout will include:

  • Blandair Park: Phase 1 is open — what’s next?
  • Woodlawn Slave Quarters: CA’s sensitive restoration helps interpret Howard County history
  • Oakland Ridge Industrial Park: Columbia’s first industrial area has become a hidden marketplace
  • Thunder Hill: From Sleeping Dog Lane to Soaring Hill, the story behind the street names
  • Jackson Pond: From farm pond, to experimental storm water retention, to neighborhood amenity
  • Symphony Woods and downtown redevelopment: Past, present and future

Here are three reasons why you should participate in BikeAbout 2012:

  1. Great exercise. Biking helps improve cardiovascular fitness and burns off calories. Not to mention, it has been linked to improved mental health (as mentioned above)
  2. It’s a fun history lesson. There is so much history in your own backyard. Learn about the history of Columbia in areas including Oakland Ridge Industrial (Columbia’s first industrial area), Jackson Pond, Symphony Woods and more.
  3. Save gas. Why drive around Columbia when you can ride your bike? Let’s face it, gas isn’t cheap anymore. Save your gas.

Pre-registration for the BikeAbout is encouraged. Registration can be done online at Bikeabout.eventbrite.com/. Online registration ends September 13.

Columbia BikeAbout is hosted by Columbia Archives. For more information, go toColumbiaArchives.org, email Columbia.Archives@ColumbiaAssociation.org or call 410-715-6781.


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On August 15, 28 year-old Orioles pitcher Miguel Gonzalez led the Orioles to a 6-3 victory over the Boston Red Sox. A win over the Red Sox is a great way to start any story, but the real headliner of this tale is the young, struggling Minor League pitcher who, due to extensive elbow injuries and elbow reconstruction, had limited hopes of making it to the Major Leagues.  Gonzalez, who had played well in the Minors, missed the entire 2009 system after undergoing Tommy John surgery (ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstruction) to repair his pitching elbow. Gonzalez’ career might have ended with his injury, but improved surgical techniques and a bid by the Orioles gave him a chance at the Show.

Elbow injuries, as well as other joint, tendon and bone injuries are not just a common part of the professional athlete’s career; they are quickly becoming a common occurrence in the rest of the population, as well.  Baby boomers, weekend warriors and aging amateur athletes have contributed to a significant increase in orthopedic injuries. According to the CDC National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, in 2009, there were an estimated 49 million visits to non-federally employed, office-based physicians specializing in orthopedic surgery in the United States.  These gym or sports injuries have become the number two reason for doctors’ office visits.

Fortunately, the Tommy John surgeries, and other technically advanced elbow procedures once reserved for elite athletes, are now available in our own operating rooms. Unlike Gonzalez, we may have given up on making it to the Show, but these new techniques can help us return to the daily grind or help us get our serve back into shape.

To learn more,  join us on September 12, when Kurram Pervaiz, M.D., an orthopedic surgeon with specialized upper extremity and elbow fellowship training, will present a free lecture at the Howard County General Hospital, Johns Hopkins Medicine Wellness Center. The discussion will focus on the injuries and diseases that affect this critical joint and the advanced surgical treatments that are now available.

Gonzalez continues to pitch well. “It means a lot to me,” Gonzalez said, “For them (the Orioles) to give me the opportunity to pitch, to start, and just do what I had to do.”   Last Friday, August 31, Gonazlez lead the Orioles to another win- this time against the New York Yankees- where he pitched seven scoreless innings and recorded a career high nine strikeouts.  If beating the Red Sox is a great story opener, beating the Yankees is most certainly the happy-ever-after ending!

Mary Catherine Cochran works as a Senior Communications Project Manager at Howard County General Hospital: Johns Hopkins Medicine where, among other things, she manages and writes for the Well & Wise blog.

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by Jessica “JP” Protasio

The sun peeked over the horizon with rosy reds and pinks nestled in blue and purple clouds. “Today, I race as a survivor, with survivors, and for survivors!” I shouted as loudly as I could on the side of the hill overlooking Centennial Lake on August 19th. I felt my voice waver with emotion. Hand-in-hand we stood in an impressive circle of 100+ athletes who called out the names of loved ones they were dedicating this race to and why they were participating in this one-of-a-kind event. Today, was the 2012 Athleta Iron Girl Columbia Triathlon. It was a year in the making, and all those reasons would continue to carry us through the next few hours of swimming, biking, and running.

This was a year of successes and failures, peppered with injuries, illness, recovery, and re-motivation. I had had a plan, and life did its thing and my plans had to change. I battled an episode of liver rejection, which landed me in the hospital. I struggled with the threat of new cancer and new disease in my life. I fought with my personal failures and unrealistic expectations. I embraced my limited ability and put my pride aside. I changed my plans to fit reality. I was able to do this because of the people who supported me and wanted to see me succeed. I had to work on my perspective.

As a survivor I struggle with how cancer has affected my outlook on life and what I feel I can accomplish. Most times, I sport an attitude of “it’s not cancer” and that helps minimize the intimidation factor of anything new or squashes the ridiculous complaints that occasionally escape my lips. Yet, cancer has brought hesitation and fear into my life when it comes to making decisions or accepting new responsibilities. There was a time when challenges would excite me and I possessed resolute confidence. Now, I’m careful when it comes to my encounters with the unknown. Perhaps, it’s a combination of age and experience–finding that wisdom when and where to step up or step down. Yet, cancer played its part in shaping how I approach the world- and I choose to face it directly with no apologies or excuses.

So, I ran, jogged, walked, sauntered, skipped, shuffled, and trotted 3.4 miles to cross the finish line holding the hands of my teammates, celebrating our accomplishment and basking in the unconditional love and support of our friends. I embraced my mentor and we cried together, rejoicing in that moment, knowing that this was only the beginning of even greater things to come. I’m a survivor. Cancer did not and will not stop me.

JP is a Children’s Instructor & Research Specialist at the Savage Branch of the Howard County Library System. She is a Pajama Time storyteller, wannabe triathlete, KPOP-addict, baker of cupcakes, and a cancer survivor.

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