2012 Calendar

August 31st 2:00- 6:00 p.m. HCGH Farmer’s Market.  Come and pick out some fresh fruits and veggies from our Farmer’s Market.  Did you know that the products at HCGH are 100% Howard County grown or produced?

Ongoing.  ARTsites 2012 is the Howard County Arts Council’s year-long, outdoor public art exhibit. Sculptures have been temporarily installed at 12 locations throughout Howard County (including Howard County General Hospital and The Howard County Library System) in order to generate interest in public art and make art more accessible to the community. The sculptures will remain in place for one year. Information on the sculptures and their locations can be found on the Arts Council’s website, www.hocoarts.org/exhibits. Free.

Ongoing Through September 15. Guilford Elementary Book Drive. The Community of Monarch Mills in Columbia is hosting a book drive to benefit its neighbor, Guilford Elementary and they thought the readers of Well & Wise would be a good resource for book donations. They are  looking for gently used picture and chapter books for ages 4-10. Books can be dropped off the Monarch Mills Clubhouse sitting room. The drive ends September 15. The flyer can be found here.

August 27, 10:15 & 11:30 a.m.  Baby Sign. Come to the Central Branch to learn basic signs in American Sign Language. Ages 6-23 months with adult; 30 min. Six-week series. No registration required.

September 1, 10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Ask A Master Gardener. Discuss gardening questions and concerns at the Elkridge Branch. No registration required.

September 2-3. Howard County Library System Closed for Labor Day Holiday

September 5, 10:15 & 11:15 a.m. Just For Me. A class at the Elkridge Branch for children ages 3-5 who are ready for an independent class that includes creative expression, listening comprehension, and early reading skills. 30 min. No registration required.

September 5, 10:30-11:00 a.m. Mini Milestones. Come to the Glenwood Branch to prepare your toddler as you learn about some mini milestones. Ages 18-36 months with adult; 30 min. Register online or by calling 410.313.5579.

September 5, 7:00  p.m. Bulbs In the Garden. Master Gardener Judy Petersen comes to the Savage Branch and offers a whirlwind tour of bulbs, their history, nature, selection, planting, and care. Register online or by calling 410.880.5980.

September 5, 7:00 p.m. Composting Demo. Presented by Master Gardener Jerry Fitzpatrick at the Miller Branch. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950

September 7, 2:00- 6:00 p.m. HCGH Farmer’s Market.  Come and pick out some fresh fruits and veggies from our Farmer’s Market.  Did you know that the products at HCGH are 100% Howard County grown or produced?

September 8, 11:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Healthy Kids in Healthy Families Clinic at the Lord & Taylor Court in the Mall in Columbia. Bring your family for pediatric vision, asthma, height, weight and blood pressure screenings. Ask a pediatrician questions and learn about healthy nutrition and other tips for the whole family. Registration not required!

September 8, 10:00 a.m. Wonder Walk: Geocaching: Find Hidden Treasures on the Trail. Can you Geocache? Learn the trendy new tech-version of orienteering. Come as a family to participate in a challenging and exciting “scavenger” hunt, looking for natures’ bounty in the woods using a handheld GPS. Volunteer naturalists will assist you in learning to use this fun device that the Conservancy currently uses in its middle and high school programs. Please sign up in advance. In case of rain, check website. Free.

September 8, 10:00-11:30 a.m. and 1:00- 2:30 p.m. Pooches’ Pool Party. Wrap up the “Dog Days” of summer with this annual canine-only swim event. Pooches and their human pals are invited to paddle and play before the pool is closed for the summer. The County’s dog park/off-leash rules apply and all dog handlers must be at least 18 years old.  To register for the event call 410 313-PARK. $10.00 per dog.

September 9, 8:30 a.m. Centennial Park. Police Pace. Join members of the Howard County Police Department and Police Foundation for the 21st Annual 5K race and 1 mile fun walk/run.  There will be children’s activities, including face painting and balloons, and police displays including motorcycles, police K9s and the SWAT team and more. Participants receive a race t-shirt. Register online through August 31 and save!

September 9, 10:00 a.m.- 3:00 p.m. Second Sunday Market in Historic Ellicott City. Fresh produce and baked breads and cheeses and much, much more behind the Little French Market.


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by Sharon McRae

With Labor Day upon us, I wanted to share a healthy alternative to traditional barbecue fair. It’s so easy to make your own delicious, nutrient- and fiber-rich (and low calorie and fat!) bean/veggie burgers, and you can make them on the grill or in the oven. Here is a great resource for some general guidelines:

I used this as a template and recently came up with some burgers that were a huge hit with the whole family:

Quinoa Adzuki Bean Burgers
Mash 4 cups adzuki beans using a potato masher or food processor with the “S” blade. Mix mashed beans with 2 cups cooked black or red quinoa. Chop ½ red pepper, ½ red onion, 3 cloves garlic, 3 carrots in the food processor and add to bean/grain mixture. Next, add in spices of your choice (I used rosemary, thyme (few leaves each of fresh), 1 tsp curry powder, and ½ tsp garam masala.

To bind the ingredients, I chose to use chia seeds, which are a wonderful source of healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Make a chia gel by adding 2-1/2 Tbs chia seeds to 6 Tbs warm water, let sit for a few minutes, then stir into mixture. Form into patties and bake 15-20 minutes per side at 350ー or lay them on the grill. Enjoy on whole or sprouted wheat rolls/bread with tomato and lettuce slices, or sandwich them in Romaine, collard, or Lacinato kale leaves, like we do.

These burgers are full of heart-healthy fiber and loads of vitamins and antioxidants. Enjoy and have a wonderful Labor Day!

Sharon McRae is a Certified Health Coach and mother of three, who has been adopting and applying principles of health and nutrition in her own life for more than three decades. She became a health coach to fulfill her passion of helping others feel their best and achieve optimal health through adaptation of a plant-based, whole-foods diet, as well as other healthy lifestyle modifications. Sharon received her training at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition in New York City. See www.eatwell-staywell.com for more information.

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by Barbara Cornell

I’m back at the “New” book shelves at my Glenwood Branch of the Howard County Library System, and I have found several very different books on healthy eating I want to share with you.

The first is Gordon Ramsay’s Healthy Appetite, 1012.  Emily Quah is given credit for the “text,” but Ramsay is clearly the executive chef here.  The food is lovingly styled and photographed which makes me want to buy it if not bake it.  This was first published in Ramsay’s native London in 2008.  I don’t know how much translation was required to Americanize the text and ingredients, but I needed Wikipedia to find out what quark is and I’ve never seen chickory or woodcocks in my grocery store.  That said, Ramsay says: “Healthy eating is a topic close to my heart” (he is dedicated to running 10 marathons before he turns 45), and he promises to deliver healthy food without jeopardizing taste and flavor.  His recipes are well illustrated with very clear instructions even if some of his ingredients are a little exotic (no, I am not going to try the squid, thank you).  The tone of his book is evidently a huge departure from Chef Ramsay’s on-screen persona.  I’ve not had the pleasure of watching his Hell’s Kitchen or Kitchen Nightmares episodes, but my friends assure me he’s “very intense” and his temper is as fiery as his grill.  No expletives made it into his book, however, so enjoy.

My next “healthy eating” book is very different from your usual cookbook.  Portion Size Me: A Kid-Driven Plan to a Healthier Family, 2012, is written by young Marshall Reid and his mom, Alexandra.  When he was 10, Marshall asked his mom if his family could “do the opposite of the Super Size Me documentary and be healthy for a month.”  He had had enough of his classmates making fun of him and was worried he would always feel unhappy.  The month of healthy eating led to a series of videos, which you can see online at www.portionsize.me, and to this book for which Marshall and his family went on a 9000-mile book tour.  Marshall even got to visit with his heroes Jamie Oliver and Nate Berkus on Nate’s TV show.  The book is written in a mash-up style aimed at appealing to 12 year-old kids with messages from Marshall with a “hey, look what I found!” tone, and lots of sidebars and recipes and notes pointing the reader to the website.  This would be a good book for a family to own, especially because of the day-to-day diary for the month with weekly “track your progress” pages.  If your family sticks with it, you will need more than the library’s 3-week loan period!

My third is The I love Trader Joe’s College Cookbook: 150 Cheap and Easy Gourmet Recipes, by Andrea Lynn, 2011.  Good style, good variety of recipes, adventurous for the actual “cook,” but every recipe cites Trader Joe’s ingredients, which I found just a little tedious.  Tuck this one into your college student’s luggage—especially if there is a Trader Joe’s near campus.

We have one more “Farmers’ Market Chef” class at the Glenwood Branch before our winter hiatus.  We’ll be discussing “What can you do with a squash” Saturday, 9/22, 10-11:30am.  Hope you can come.  We always have more fun when there are more people to share their ideas.  We’ll continue to share books and other ideas here at Well & Wise!

Barbara Cornell joined the Howard County Library System in 1993 as Assistant Branch Manager at the new Elkridge Branch.

Since 2000 she has enjoyed a shorter commute to the Glenwood Branch.

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2012 CalendarAugust 24th 2:00- 6:00 p.m. HCGH Farmer’s Market.  Come and pick out some fresh fruits and veggies from our Farmer’s Market.  Did you know that the products at HCGH are 100% Howard County grown or produced?

August 24, 10:15 & 11:30 a.m. Funtastic FridaysHave FUN at the East Columbia Branch with art, science, music, or a favorite storybook character. For ages 3-5. Tickets available at Children’s Desk 15-30 minutes before class.

August 25, 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. Essentials in Babysitting at the Howard County General Hospital: Johns Hopkins Medicine Wellness Center. Are you ready to be a babysitter?  Learn the skills and knowledge necessary to become a responsible babysitter including how to effectively manage children, create a safe environment and apply basic emergency techniques. Marketing tips and age-appropriate activities for children will also be discussed.  For children ages 11-13. Lunch will be provided. $50.00. 10710 Charter Drive. Call 410-740-7601 for more information.

August 25, 10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Ask A Master Gardener. Discuss gardening questions and concerns at the Savage and Miller Branches. Offered again at the Miller Branch at 7pm. No registration required.

August 25, 2:00 p.m. Herb Walk. Presented at the Miller Branch by Charlene Muhammad, MS Consultant at Howard County General Hospital’s Wellness Center. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

August 27, 11:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.  Just For Me. A class at the Savage Branch for children ages 3-5 who are ready for an independent class that includes creative expression, listening comprehension, and early reading skills. No registration required.

August 31st 2:00- 6:00 p.m. HCGH Farmer’s Market.  Come and pick out some fresh fruits and veggies from our Farmer’s Market.  Did you know that the products at HCGH are 100% Howard County grown or produced?

Ongoing.  ARTsites 2012 is the Howard County Arts Council’s year-long, outdoor public art exhibit. Sculptures have been temporarily installed at 12 locations throughout Howard County (including Howard County General Hospital and The Howard County Library System) in order to generate interest in public art and make art more accessible to the community. The sculptures will remain in place for one year. Information on the sculptures and their locations can be found on the Arts Council’s website, www.hocoarts.org/exhibits. Free.

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by Cherise Tasker

It is the time of year when every store seems to have a section for “Back to School.” When “Back to School” is “Off to College,” how does one prepare? The emotional aspect of sending a kid to freshman year of college will be explored in a September post. For now, you are probably checking off those lists of what your son or daughter will need to pack. After buying the dorm mattress extra long twin sheets, consider some options for making sure you have everything.

Packing lists are posted on many school websites in a section for parents and/or new students. If your student’s college/university does not have a list posted, check a different college site. College Confidential also has packing lists posted by upperclassmen who have been through the process before.

Technology is important to consider. Many schools advise that hardware, operating system software, applications, etc., be no older than 3 years for incoming freshman. Many schools’ websites address technology requirements including information on campus internet access, printer availability, and the question of Mac vs. PC. It can be critical in an older dorm room with limited outlets to have a power strip. Be sure that your student packs all needed chargers for items such as laptops and iPods.

Climate is another consideration because your student’s current wardrobe may not meet the needs of the weather at his or her destination. Students who will be participating in sports and/or the arts may have special equipment and clothing that the school expects them to bring to orientation. The school’s Facebook page may be a helpful source of information for what a new student may need for activities and for living in a particular dorm. Once the clothing is packed, think about the storage constraints in a given dorm. Can your student bring containers for under-the-bed storage or will s/he have a bunk bed? Will hooks that hang over the door be helpful or will the closet not have a door? Do the rooms in the dorm have a mirror? A trash can? A book shelf?

Personalized health care items such as medications, glasses, contact lenses, and dental retainers merit special attention. For example, does your student need an eye exam so that refills on disposable contacts can be ordered in advance? Small sizes of various over-the-counter basics such as mild pain reliever and flu symptom-relief medication may be helpful to pack alongside the standard shampoo, soap, and toothbrush. A plastic container filled with “just in case” items will allow you to help your child via long distance: “Try the Benadryl we packed in your toiletry box.”

Finally, special treats, for yourself and your student, will help with the transition to come. A favorite book might be the perfect thing.

Cherise Tasker is a new member of the Central Branch team. She is an Instructor & Research Specialist who will be coordinating the Homebound Books services. Cherise is excited to be joining HCLS after working in the field of health information technology.

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Bridget Hughes, licensed acupuncturist, Qigong instructor, and owner of Healing Point Acupuncture & Healing Arts in the Medical Pavilion at Howard County is fascinated with the ways our thoughts, feelings, and movements create physiological cascades that influence our health all the way to the level of our DNA. In two offerings of a one-day seminar entitled Qigong: Meditation in Motion, she explores ways to powerfully change how we think and feel, coupled with a set of ancient Chinese longevity movements known to increase the vital force known as Qi (pronounced “chee”) of the body. Through the use of these practices she believes we can literally change our physiology and change our health.

Hughes says, “Science shows us that being angry for five minutes causes immune complexes in our bloodstream to decrease, while laughing for five minutes causes beneficial changes in immunity. This is only one of many markers for ways our physiology changes based on our feeling states. That it happens is no surprise; the trick is to learn to create powerful feeling states that support our health.  Usually people don’t think of this as a learnable skill.”

But Hughes cites research from scientist Richard Davidson made famous by Dr. Andrew Weil in his book Spontaneous Happiness that shows that happiness is a learned skill quite like learning a sport or a musical instrument. Proper training and practice are the key.  Hughes’ seminars offer just that, and teach students over the course of one day how to access health engendering feeling states that serve as the basis for both a meditation practice and Qigong practice.

If you are interested in learning more, check out her free class or her longer seminars.

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September 11th 2012. Free Introductory Class 7:00 -8:30 p.m. Howard County General Hospital: Johns Hopkins Medicine Wellness Center Suite 100, 10710 Charter Drive, Columbia, MD 21044 Register: (410) 740-7601

September 22nd 2012. One Day Seminar 10:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Bring a lunch! Cost:$80.00 East Columbia 50+ Center 6600 Cradlerock Way, Columbia MD 21045 Register: 410 313-7680

October 27th 2012. One Day Seminar 10:00 a.m -5:00 p.m. Bring a lunch! Cost: $80.00 Howard County General Hospital: Johns Hopkins Medicine Wellness Center Suite 100, 10710 Charter Drive, Columbia, MD 21044 Register: (410) 964-9100 x2 or email: bridget@healingpoint.biz

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by Matthew Hall

I personally do not run long distance, ever. I hate doing it, and as soon as I realized it would not be the most effective way for me to lose fat, I cut it out. Some people love to run, and that’s fine with me, but most people that I talk to who are interested in getting into shape are not interested in having to run several miles a week. Maybe this is you too! If so, let me introduce you to hill sprints.

The concept is simple: find a  hill and run up it as fast as you can. I would recommend that the distance covered be somewhere between 15-20 yards, and the incline something that is moderately steep but you would be comfortable walking up. Hill sprints are typically safer for most people than flat-land sprints because the angle means there is less impact and there is less risk of pulling something. Be sure to warm up and do some light stretching beforehand, and get the form down before you give them your best effort. My favorite hill in Columbia is at the lakefront, right between the hotel and the edge of the restaurants. You can start at the footpath and run up to the parking lot.

Adding this into your fitness regimen should not be difficult, as it will take you only 15-20 minutes to get a great workout. I found that after doing these a few times, I was able to sprint up the hill, walk back down, and up again 15 times in about 20 minutes. If this is the only exercise you want to do in a week to lose some fat, you can do these three to four times a week, 10-15 sprints a time. Set a goal time and try to do them with as little rest as possible. If you already do interval training or play a sport that would benefit from being faster and more explosive, work these into your training once or twice a week.

Matthew Hall is currently a Customer Service Specialist  for the Central Branch of Howard County Library System. He spends the majority of his free time with his wife and kids. He is a graduate of Liberty University, and his interests include religious studies, psychology, and fitness.

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2012 CalendarAugust 17th 2:00- 6:00 p.m. HCGH Farmer’s Market.  Come and pick out some fresh fruits and veggies from our Farmer’s Market.  Did you know that the products at HCGH are 100% Howard County grown or produced?

August 18. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Cricket Crawl and Night Walk.  Are you ready for the 2012 ‘Cricket Crawl?’ Be a part of a national Cricket Census project, collecting data on the Historical Park’s cricket species. Visitors will learn the different sounds of the eight key species before going out on a walk of the ground to discover some of the mystery behind these interesting creatures. Admission is free, open to all ages. Banneker Historical Park and Museum. 300 Oella Ave, Oella 21228. Call 410-887-1081 for more information.

August 18-22, Various times and Branches. Kindergarten, Here We Come. Stories and activities at to help mark that all important first day, including boarding a real school bus. For children entering Kindergarten this fall; 45- 60 min. Cosponsored by Friends of Howard County Library and Howard County Public School System. Registration is required; contact your Branch for more information or to register.

August 18, 3:00 p.mHerbal Apothecary. Join Master Gardener Anne Roy at the Miller Branch for a brief look at plants and their uses for medicines, perfumes, cooking, and flavorings. Visit the Enchanted Garden to touch, see, and smell many of the plants. For ages 9-12; 30 – 60 min. Signed release form required. Click here to download form Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

August 19.  Iron Girl Triathalon- A premier triathlon for women featuring a 0.62mi Swim – 17.5mi Bike – 3.4mi Run hosted annually at Centennial Lake by The Columbia Triathlon.  Come out and support Team Conquer- a team composed of hospital employees, volunteers and survivors as they compete to raise funds for the Claudia Mayer Cancer Resource Center.

 August 19. 6:30-9:30 p.mLakefront Concert: Old Man Brown at the Columbia Lakefront. Bring a blanket or a lawn chair and enjoy the Southern Soul/Rock/Blues.

August 20. 9:00-11:00 a.m. Free Diabetes Screening at the Howard County General Hospital: Johns Hopkins Medicine Wellness Center.  Are you concerned about your risk factors for diabetes? Meet with a registered nurse to receive a free diabetes screening which includes a risk assessment and a blood test. Receive immediate results. Fasting 8 hours prior to test is recommended.10710 Charter Drive.  Call 410-740-7601 for more information.

August 20, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring at the Glenwood Branch offered by Howard County General Hospital. Every 1st & 3rd Monday.

August 21-23. Various times and branches. Movin’ Up To Middle School. Starting sixth grade? Meet new classmates, discuss the big move, and learn the secrets to success. Compete in a bookbag relay and combination lock time-trial! Registration is required; contact your Branch for more information or to register.

August 21. 10:00 a.m.- 2:00 p.m. Senior Safety Awareness Day. Presented by the Ellicott City Senior Center. Come and learn the latest safety initiatives from the County’s Police Department, Department of Fire & Rescue Services and Office of Consumer Affairas, as well as the Mid-Atlantic AAA and Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration. Participants can also take a tour of the Police Department’s Mobile Command Unit. There will be four presentations throughout the day, at 10 a.m., 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.; presentation topics include: Don’t Get Burned (Fire & Safety Tips), Arm Yourself with Knowledge (Preventing Home Repair Scams), the Silent Crime (Domestic Violence), and Preparing for the Road Ahead (Driving As We Age). For more information or to reserve a gourmet box lunch for the event ($5), call the Ellicott City Senior Center at 410-313-1400. Ellicott City Senior Center, 9401 Frederick Rd.

August 23, 6:00 p.m. Get Fit With The Boot Camp Girl. Stephanie Dignan runs you through your paces in the beautiful Western Regional Park. Meet at Glenwood Branch first.  Register online or by calling 410.313.5577. .

August 24, 10:15 & 11:30 a.m. Funtastic Fridays. Have FUN at the East Columbia Branch with art, science, music, or a favorite storybook character. For ages 3-5. Tickets available at Children’s Desk 15-30 minutes before class.

August 24th 2:00- 6:00 p.m. HCGH Farmer’s Market.  Come and pick out some fresh fruits and veggies from our Farmer’s Market.  Did you know that the products at HCGH are 100% Howard County grown or produced?

August 25, 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. Essentials in Babysitting at the Howard County General Hospital: Johns Hopkins Medicine Wellness Center. Are you ready to be a babysitter?  Learn the skills and knowledge necessary to become a responsible babysitter including how to effectively manage children, create a safe environment and apply basic emergency techniques. Marketing tips and age-appropriate activities for children will also be discussed.  For children ages 11-13. Lunch will be provided. $50.00. 10710 Charter Drive. Call 410-740-7601 for more information.

August 31st 2:00- 6:00 p.m. HCGH Farmer’s Market.  Come and pick out some fresh fruits and veggies from our Farmer’s Market.  Did you know that the products at HCGH are 100% Howard County grown or produced?

Ongoing.  ARTsites 2012 is the Howard County Arts Council’s year-long, outdoor public art exhibit. Sculptures have been temporarily installed at 12 locations throughout Howard County (including Howard County General Hospital and The Howard County Library System) in order to generate interest in public art and make art more accessible to the community. The sculptures will remain in place for one year. Information on the sculptures and their locations can be found on the Arts Council’s website, www.hocoarts.org/exhibits. Free.

 

 

 


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Some folks around the library are getting their kids ready for school, which includes making sure they have all the vaccinations up to date. If you’re unsure about vaccinations and what they entail, Howard County Public School system provides a nice resource. Many of us were pretty surprised to hear that whooping cough was among the vaccinations, though medical offices tend to refer to it by it’s formal name of Pertussis.

Here’s a little bit of info on it from our favorite quick medical info database, MedlinePlus: “Whooping cough is an infectious bacterial disease that causes uncontrollable coughing. The name comes from the noise you make when you take a breath after you cough. You may have choking spells or may cough so hard that you vomit.” Sounds lovely, doesn’t it? But it also sounds like something from long ago? Why is there still a vaccine?

Well, according to our friends at the CDC, “Reported cases of pertussis vary from year to year and tend to peak every 3-5 years. In 2010, 27,550 cases of pertussis were reported in the U.S.—and many more cases go unreported. Twenty-seven deaths were reported – 25 of these deaths were in children younger than 1 year old.” That’s right, the Whooping Cough is still around, still a killer, and is most common in infants and children, mainly affecting infants younger than 6 months old, before they’re adequately protected by immunizations, and kids 11-18, whose immunity has started to wane.

This is pretty scary business. So it helps to know the signs and symptoms. The first symptoms of whooping cough, unfortunately, are quite similar to those of a common cold. They include runny nose, sneezing, mild cough, and low-grade fever. Not so bad, so far, but then KidsHealth goes on to enlighten us further: “After about 1 to 2 weeks, the dry, irritating cough evolves into coughing spells. During a coughing spell, which can last for more than a minute, the child may turn red or purple. At the end of a spell, the child may make a characteristic whooping sound when breathing in or may vomit. Between spells, the child usually feels well.”

And as if the early symptoms resembling a cold and the sufferer usually feeling well when not coughing didn’t already make it a tricky enough illness to spot, not all children will develop the characteristic whoop and sometimes infants don’t cough at all. “Infants may look as if they’re gasping for air with a reddened face and may actually stop breathing (called apnea) for a few seconds during particularly bad spells. Adults and teens with whooping cough may have milder or atypical symptoms, such as a prolonged cough (rather than coughing spells) or coughing without the whoop.”And, wouldn’t you know, Whooping Cough is also highly contagious.

So what’s the best way to fight off this seemingly archaic beast? The CDC recommends vaccination. “Parents can also help protect infants by keeping them away as much as possible from anyone who has cold symptoms or is coughing…. In the US, the recommended pertussis vaccine for children is called DtaP…. For maximum protection against pertussis, children need five DTaP shots. The first three shots are given at 2, 4, and 6 months of age. The fourth shot is given at 15 through 18 months of age, and a fifth shot is given when a child enters school, at 4 through 6 years of age.”

Preteens going to the doctor for their regular check-up at age 11 or 12 years should also get booster vaccine, and pregnant women who have not been previously vaccinated with Tdap should get one dose of Tdap during the third trimester or late second trimester, or immediately postpartum. And guess what, grown-ups, you’re not off the hook; adults 19 years of age and older who didn’t get Tdap as a preteen or teen should get one dose of Tdap. The easiest thing for adults to do is to get Tdap instead of their next regular tetanus booster—the Td shot that is recommended for adults every 10 years.


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More food consumption and less physical activity seems to be a popular trend in our society, especially with children. In fact, childhood obesity has almost tripled over the past 30 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  Furthermore, in 2007, the National Initiative for Children’s Healthcare Quality (NICHQ) published a study stating that 28.8 percent of children in Maryland were considered to be either overweight or obese.

According to the CDC, the term overweight means “having excess body weight for a particular height from fat, muscle, bone, water or a combination of these factors.” Obesity, meanwhile, is defined as “having excess body fat.”

Those alarmingly high statistics have led the CDC to declare childhood obesity a national epidemic. Being overweight is serious. It increases the risks of health issues such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol — which can lead to cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and many types of cancer.

With obesity becoming more prevalent in our culture, Columbia Association (CA) is working relentlessly to help its residents stay fit and active.

CA offers a program called Columbia YouthFit, which was developed by child care and mental health professionals and pediatricians. YouthFit is a physician referral health program designed to help families lose weight through motivation, physical activity and healthy eating.

“The main reason why families should consider YouthFit is because the program offers the three key components to overcoming childhood weight problems: nutrition education, physical activity, and behavior changes — for all family members,” says Shawni Paraska, director of community health sustainability at CA.

The eight-week program is held at Columbia Gym on Wednesday evenings from 6:30-8:30 p.m. The next session begins on October 3.

For more information, please contact Shawni Paraska, director of community health sustainability, at 410-715-3128, Shawni.Paraska@ColumbiaAssociation.org, or visit Columbia YouthFit’s website.

Keithan Samuels works in the Communications and Engagement Division at Columbia Association (CA).

 


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By Aryn Dagirmanjian

With Scott Jurek’s new book, Eat & Run: My Unlikely Journey to Marathon Greatness flying off the shelves, one begins to wonder about the reasons why we eat meat. If Scott Jurek can run 100+ miles in the Badlands during the summer on nothing but vegetables and beans, why are we so convinced being vegan is impossible for our average gym-goer?

Many professional athletes are starting to espouse the wonders of going animal-free: more energy, better performance, and happier doctors. Brendan Brazier, professional triathlete and author of Thrive: The Vegan Nutrition Guide to Optimal Performance in Sports and Life, emphasizes the lowering of bad cholesterol and honing of lean, instead of bulky, muscle growth, while Jurek mentions the ease of digestibility–making it easier to eat on the go.

Not all of us are professional athletes however, so why would we make the switch? There are plenty of other books for those interested in the subject. Veganist: Lose Weight, Get Healthy, Change the World, by Kathy Freston, is a popular starter book filled with medical research on how vegan diets affect our bodies. According to Freston, vegetarian and vegan diets have been shown to lower chances of many different types of cancer and other life-threatening diseases. It is also a great weight-loss strategy and is often recommended as a way to help manage diabetes. Veganist is not a cookbook, but it does give sample menus of what the author herself eats so you can get an idea of the variety. I also like The Food Substitutions Bible by David Joachim, which can help if you already know how to cook and you want to know what works in place of animal products.

The web is also full of restaurant guides for those looking to eat out and shop vegan-style. Happycow.net is always the first place I look. The site allows the user to search by area and includes “veg-friendly” places for those who are going with non-vegetarian friends.

So, while you may not want to drop animal products completely, you may want to consider trying a veggie-burger the next time you’re out to dinner. As always, if you do decide to make the switch, make sure to consult your physician before making any sudden changes in your diet.

Aryn Dagirmanjian is a Instructor & Research Specialist for the Miller Branch of the Howard County Library System.

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2012 CalendarAugust 11. 10:00 a.m.  WONDER WALK: Amazing Monarchs and Other Butterflies with Mike Raupp.  Monarchs of the butterfly world! Beautifully-garbed in colors advertizing toxic powers. Shiny gold-flecked chrysalises, caterpillars voraciously drinking strong potion-like milkweed juices. Thousands of miles of migration travel. What amazing little insects! Learn all about these and other wonderful butterflies from this passionate expert. Dr. Michael Raupp is Professor, Entomology, University of Maryland. Rain or shine. FREE.

August 11, 10:00 a.m. The Farmer’s Market Chef. Before visiting the Glenwood Farmers’ Market, discover creative ideas for using seasonal produce or CSA shares. Samples available. This session, preserving the bounty of the season. Register online or by calling 410.313.5577.

August 11, 1:00 p.m. Saturdays in the Garden. Explore fundamental concepts in environmental science at the Miller Branch by measuring, counting, and recording the plants and animals within the Enchanted Garden. Ages 11-17.No registration required.

August 12. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Cuts Against Cancer.  Need a new “do” for back-to-school? Join us in support of the Claudia Mayer Cancer Resource Center at this annual event. Haircuts, manicures, seated massage, raffles and more! Medical Pavilion at Howard County. 10710 Charter Drive.

August 12. 10:30 pm to 2:00 a.m. Night Sky/Dark Sky: The Perseid Meteor Showers with Dr. Alex Storrs from Towson University & Dr. Joel Goodman, Skydoc. Join other sky watchers as we search for meteors and learn about galaxies, constellations, and ways to limit our light-pollution of the skies. Every year, the earth passes through the debris cloud left by the comet Swift Tuttle. The earth’s atmosphere is bombarded by what is popularly known as “falling stars.” While the particles are the size of a grain of sand, they travel at 71 kilometers per second, putting on a brilliant show. In case of rain, program will be indoors. FREE.

August 13-17, Various times and Branches. Kindergarten, Here We Come. Stories and activities at to help mark that all important first day, including boarding a real school bus. For children entering Kindergarten this fall; 45- 60 min. Cosponsored by Friends of Howard County Library and Howard County Public School System. Registration is required; contact your Branch for more information or to register.

August 13, 12:30-3:00 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring at the Savage Branch offered by Howard County General Hospital. 2nd Mondays. No registration required.

August 15, 7:00- 8:30 p.m. Sunset Serenades Concerts featuring Black Alley. Enjoy some soul tunes at Centennial Park. Bring a picnic dinner, blanket or lawn chair and transport yourself to the islands. Call 410 313-4451 to check on the performance in case of inclement weather. Centennial Park, South. 1000 Route 108, Ellicott City.

August 16, 7:00 p.m. Movin’ Up To Middle School. Starting sixth grade? Meet new classmates, discuss the big move, and learn the secrets to success at the Savage Branch. Compete in a book bag relay and combination lock time-trial! Register online or by calling 410.880.5980.

August 17, 7:00- 8:30 p.mTraveling Bands Summer Concerts featuring Bad Influences.  If you like Blues, Rock and Funk this will be the place to be!  Bring your family to Rockburn Park and enjoy the music under the evening sky.  Bring a picnic dinner and a blanket or lawn chair. In case of inclement weather call the weather hotline at 410 313-4451. Rockburn Branch Park West, 6014 Rockburn Branch Park Road, Elkdridge.

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By Wendy Camassar

A few months ago, I heard about a gadget called Yonanas while watching a cooking demonstration.  It’s kind of an odd looking appliance that converts frozen fruit into a “soft serve” custard.  I ran right out to Bed Bath and Beyond to buy it, because my family and I are dairy free, and always looking for “ice cream” ideas.

I love the concept that you can use fruit you already have at home or packaged frozen fruit, making it a much cheaper alternative to store bought ice cream.  Plus, it’s a much healthier treat, where no added sugar is needed. It’s also a fun way to get in those extra fruit servings.

The Yonanas machine even comes with a recipe book that gives great ideas and combinations to try.  One of my family’s favorite recipe is  “Peanut Butter & Jelly,” where you use mixed berries, bananas, then serve with an a tablespoon of peanut butter then serve!  You could even try a scoop on top of waffles for breakfast!

Do you have a picky eater who doesn’t like bananas like me?  No problem!  You don’t have to use frozen bananas in the Yonanas machine.  There are recipes where you can create different kinds of sorbet using any kind of fruit you want.  It comes out like an italian ice rather than a custard style.  I think it’s one of the best inventions- only I’m sorry I didn’t think of it first!

Below is a link to the website where you can watch a video tutorial explaining how it works.  If you’re thinking of buying one, compare prices on line, but save your Bed Bath and Beyond coupons for twenty percent off.  They never expire!  I hope you enjoy this neat little gadget as much as my family has!    http://www.yonanas.com

Wendy Camassar is an Instruction and Research Specialist at the Central Branch of the Howard County Library System.  Prior to joining HCLS, she worked as a freelance makeup artist for several years.  She enjoys hiking with her family, exercising, reading, and organic foods and skin care products.

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So, it’s Friday night and the work and school weeks are over. Now it’s time for a little fun and relaxation. In this fast-paced society, people are busy and burdened with stress. This is the age of texting, emailing and tweeting. People are out of shape, tuned out and stressed out. Now more than ever, it is important to find time for some quality family fun.

Spending time together creates a stronger bond between family and friends. Being outside has an energizing effect, which is good for the mind, body and soul. It can boost your immune system, improve your mood and even reduce signs of stress and anxiety. Did you know that watching movies also has health benefits? According to an article on Yahoo.com, movies give people an opportunity to relax their minds and their bodies. It is a time-out from daily life and a chance to connect with characters and stories from another time and place.

The Columbia Association (CA) has great programs to encourage people to get outside, recharge their batteries and enjoy time with friends and family. According to an article on Oprah.com, viewing nice scenery can activate parts of the brain that are associated with balance and happiness. One of the best ways to appreciate nature and the beautiful open space in Columbia is by spending an evening at the Downtown Columbia Lakefront.

As part of the 2012 Lakefront Summer Festival, people of all ages can enjoy Dancin’ Under the People Tree and a movie by the lakefront on Friday nights now through mid-September. There is no admission fee and parking is free. All movies are rated G unless otherwise noted on the schedule. So grab some dinner, a lawn chair, your friends and family and head to the Downtown Columbia Lakefront for an evening filled with dancing and a movie! For more information, please visit LakefrontFestival.com.

Jessica Zellweger works in the Communications and Engagement Department at the Columbia Association (CA). She also works with the Watershed Management program at CA.

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It’s August; your allotment of summer is running out.  Perhaps you want to hit the road before the kids have to head back to school.  Perhaps you’re lucky enough to be able to take a road trip once the vacation spots are free of summer vacationing students.  Either way, a road trip sounds fun, doesn’t it? Well, in order to keep it fun, here are some tips from such great sources as Road Trip America, Parents, About.com, and ehow.

Planning
Know the weather and the traffic conditions if possible.
Know your route (and alternatives, just in case)
Pack up-to-date maps or a GPS device, sunscreen/sunglasses/hat, water, first-aid kit, bug spray, warm blankets, flashlight, jumper cables, flares, flat tire-repair kit, fully charged cell phone, antibacterial wipes, toilet paper.

Road Safety
Get a pre-trip tune-up. Make sure tire pressure, oil, and water/coolant are checked.
Share the driving if possible and take lots of breaks, snack smartly and hydrate often to avoid drowsiness.
If you’re traveling with young kids, make sure booster and/or infant car seats are correctly installed. Make sure your car is free of any dangers to kids and safety locks are activated too.
Stow all objects securely; in case of sudden stops, you don’t want anything to become a dangerous projectile. Put a blanket or towel over the seats when getting out of the car so your don’t have to worry about scorched skin from a hot car seat.
If you see someone in need of help, call the police rather than pull over to help yourself.
Stay calm; driving can be frustrating, but losing your cool can be deadly.
Consider signing up for a roadside assistance plan.

Personal Safety
Avoid traveling alone if you can.
Don’t advertise that you’re on a road trip.  Look like you know where you’re going, but don’t be afraid to chat up the locals for advice about best places to go in the area.
Get a room on the second floor so you can scan parking lot before heading out.
Use truck stops; they’re often well-lit, well-populated, and surprisingly safe.
Know the emergency procedures of each town you’re in (e.g., if your road trip takes you over the border, know what the “911 equivalent” is for the area).
Use alcohol in moderation—even if you’re not driving, it’s easier to get lost, confused, turned around or make a poor decision when you’re under the influence.

Fun
Remember to keep the trip itself part of the fun.  See the sights, keep alert, and enjoy the trip.
Try listening to audiobooks or great tunes.
Skip the DVDs and try for some old-fashioned family fun.
If you must calm your younger travelers with a DVD, stick to family friendly.
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2012 CalendarAugust 3 and every Friday through October, 2:00-6:00 p.m. HCGH Farmer’s Market.  Come and pick out some fresh fruits and veggies from our Farmer’s Market.  Did you know that the products at HCGH are 100% Howard County grown or produced?.

August 4-11. The 67th Howard County Fair. A celebration of Howard County’s farming past and present. Lots of family fun with horse and livestock shows, talent show, “Kids & Critters” Barn, Horse, Mule & Tractor Pulls, amusement rides, local entertainment, pony rides and much more.

August 7, 6:00- 9:00 p.m.  National Night Out Celebration. Unity Reggae Band, Electronics recycling and much more in Harper’s Choice. Come out for the biggest National Night Out Celebration in Howard County. Visit the Harper’s Choice Community Association for more information.

August 7, 7:00-8:30 p.m. Traveling Bands Summer Concert Series featuring the U.S. Air Force Max Impact.  North Laurel Park is the place to be to listen to the Rock/Pop sounds of Max Impact.  Join the Department of Recreation and parks for this great summer concert.  Bring a picnic dinner and a blanket or lawn chair. Call 410 313-4451 to check on the performance in case of inclement weather. North Laurel Park, 9411 Whiskey Bottom Road, Laurel.

August 8, 7:00- 8:30 p.m. Sunset Serenades Summer Concert featuring Pan Masters at Centennial Park.  Need a taste of the Caribbean?  Come and listen to the steel drums and Calypso music of Pan Masters.  Bring a picnic dinner, blanket or lawn chair and transport yourself to the islands. Call 410 313-4451 to check on the performance in case of inclement weather. Centennial Park, South. 1000 Route 108, Ellicott City.

August 11. 10:00 a.m.  WONDER WALK: Amazing Monarchs and Other Butterflies with Mike Raupp.  Monarchs of the butterfly world! Beautifully-garbed in colors advertizing toxic powers. Shiny gold-flecked chrysalises, caterpillars voraciously drinking strong potion-like milkweed juices. Thousands of miles of migration travel. What amazing little insects! Learn all about these and other wonderful butterflies from this passionate expert. Dr. Michael Raupp is Professor, Entomology, University of Maryland. Rain or shine. FREE.

August 12. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Cuts Against Cancer.  Need a new “do” for back-to-school? Join us in support of the Claudia Mayer Cancer Resource Center at this annual event. Haircuts, manicures, seated massage, raffles and more! Medical Pavilion at Howard County. 10710 Charter Drive.

August 12. 10:30 pm to 2:00 a.m. Night Sky/Dark Sky: The Perseid Meteor Showers with Dr. Alex Storrs from Towson University & Dr. Joel Goodman, Skydoc. Join other sky watchers as we search for meteors and learn about galaxies, constellations, and ways to limit our light-pollution of the skies. Every year, the earth passes through the debris cloud left by the comet Swift Tuttle. The earth’s atmosphere is bombarded by what is popularly known as “falling stars.” While the particles are the size of a grain of sand, they travel at 71 kilometers per second, putting on a brilliant show. In case of rain, program will be indoors. FREE.


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by Rebecca Sexton

Are you feeling Hot, Hot, Hot? I’m just writing this as a reminder to stay healthy out in the sun. We’ve heard it before, but why are we lax about protecting ourselves when we are in the sun? I learned a few new things and got a reminder myself about protecting my skin while I was preparing for my “Fun in the Sun” class for the Howard County Library System.

It’s summertime, and we love to be outside. It’s beach time and time to cool at the pool. But think again about going out in the sun, even for a short time, without stopping to put sunscreen on. We all know that we should use it. Skin can start to burn in about 10 to 15 minutes without sunscreen, causing damage to our cells. There are no healthy tans. Prevention, Prevention, Prevention is the best way to avoid early signs of skin aging, cataracts, a weakened immune system, basal cell carcinomas, and melanoma.

Here’s something fun to remember that I learned myself in preparing for my class, sing the Slip, Slop, Slap and Wrap song. You can make up your own tune. I use Steam Heat  from the musical, The Pajama Game.

“Slip, Slop, Slap, and Wrap” is a catch phrase from the American Cancer Society:
•    Slip on a shirt. Cover up as best as you can. There are many fabrics that offer UV protection.
•    Slop on Sunscreen–SPF 30 or Higher. SPF 30 blocks out about 97% of harmful UV rays. SPF45 blocks out about 98% of harmful UV rays. SPF 55 and higher offers about 99% protection of harmful UV rays.
•    Slap on a hat.
•    Wrap those beautiful eyes in the protection of sunglasses UV rated 400 or above.

Sunscreens can work if used properly. First, put plenty on. Use a handful as a beginning measure. Reapply if you are dry every 2 hours. If you are in the water, reapply every 40 minutes. Read the specific directions for your particular brand and check and see if there is an expiration date. If there isn’t one, use a fresh bottle every season.

I would be remiss if I didn’t remind everybody to drink plenty of water. Don’t wait until you are thirsty. Keep sipping away. And remember staying hydrated will make your summer safer and more enjoyable. Stay healthy, be happy, and come check out my First Aid class for kids ages 5-8 at 10:15 & 11:30am on August 8 at the East Columbia Branch.

Rebecca Sexton has an RN BSN and has worked in hospitals,home health, the community, and schools. When she retired her husband said to go do something fun and so, she volunteered at the Library. Now, she works at the East Columbia Branch of the Howard County Library System and enjoys still being able to have the opportunities to do health education and share her medical knowledge.


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