Councilman Ball presents the Council Resolution

Calvin Ball, on behalf of the Howard County Council, presents a proclamation celebrating Howard County General Hospital’s recognition by U.S. News and World Report and Becker’s Hospital Review and its contributions to improving the health of the Howard County community. Receiving the proclamation are from the left, Mary Pieprzak, MD, Secretary/ Treasurer of the Professional Staff, Evelyn T. Bolduc, Chair of the Board of Trustees, Victor A. Broccolino, President and CEO, and Peter J. Rogers, Jr., Vice Chair of the Board of Trustees.

The Resoultion reads:

Howard County General Hospital

WHEREAS, Howard County General Hospital has been ranked in the prestigious   U.S. News & World Report’s 2012-2013 Best Hospital Rankings as a high-performing hospital; and

WHEREAS,
Howard County General Hospital has been named by Becker’s Hospital Review to its list of “100 Great Community Hospitals” — the only community hospital in Maryland to be included on the national list; and

WHEREAS,
Howard County General Hospital has a skilled and caring professional staff of 1,800, including more than 900 physicians and allied professionals, representing more than 90 specialties, and about 500 dedicated volunteers;

NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED on this 30th day of July 2012,
that the County Council of Howard County, Maryland, congratulates Howard County General Hospital on its well-deserved recognition and thanks the officials, staff, and volunteers for their service to our community.


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We’re just a couple of days away from August, the dog days, the month with no national holidays, the summer wind-down time.  However lazy and slow August may be, it is not a time to drop your guard. August brings its own dangers.

If you are lounging around, don’t forget to be safe–especially if you are trying to soak in the last of the summer sun.  Look for more on that from Well & Wise on Thursday.  And don’t be fooled by clouds, the dangers of sunburn and worse are still there on overcast days. But it’s not just the UV rays you need to look out for; be aware of the signs and treatments of heat stroke and heat exhaustion.

And there are other out door hazards to think of besides that big glowing ball in the sky.  Don’t forget those little buzzing things in your ears.  Yes, summer is a time of pests. The ones to be particularly cautious of are mosquitoes, ticks, and bees/wasps. Mosquitoes cause more than itchy bug bites. As of July 24, the CDC has reported 113 cases of West Nile virus in the United States for 2012. Lyme disease continues to be a major danger of tick bites. And stinging insects cause up to an estimated one million emergency room visits per year.  So remove woodpiles, debris and standing water from your yard; cover all trash cans; wear light-colored clothing and long sleeves and pants when possible, avoid sweet-smelling perfumes, repair window screens; and try to avoid bug prime times(dusk and dawn for mosquitoes) and areas (wooded and overgrown for ticks and bees). And speaking of growing things and the problems they cause, August is still a big allergy time.  There are plenty of pollens and mold, and we certainly can’t forget ragweed.

August is still one of the busiest vacations times of the year, especially for road travel.  In fact, the National Highway Traffic Safety Association has also named it as the deadliest month of the year for traffic accidents, primarily because of the sheer volume of traffic. The NHTSA also indicated that most accidents occur between 6:00-9:00pm, when commuter and vacation travelers most frequently share the road.  So use care when traveling and maybe pick a time earlier in the day to travel.

Despite the volume of vacationers, August is also the time when we send the kids back to school. So get ready to get the kids ready and keep them safe. And remember, the Howard County Public School System starts again on August 27.

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2012 CalendarJuly 28, 10:00 a.m. WONDER WALK: Fairy Houses: Magic in the Woods. “The fields have fairies and the woods have ears…” In almost every culture there are ancient stories of tiny fairies that live in the woods and meadows. How magical? Have you ever built a house from natural findings for the fairies, hoping at least one might come to live there? Imagine acorn caps as wonderful sinks, bark as beautiful tables, pebbles in winding pathways, and moss as soft mattresses. Join Florence Miller and Audrey Suhr and build houses for the fairies at the Howard County Conservancy.

August 4-11. The 67th Howard County Fair. A celebration of Howard County’s farming past and present. Lots of family fun with horse and livestock shows, talent show, “Kids & Critters” Barn, Horse, Mule & Tractor Pulls, amusement rides, local entertainment, pony rides and much more.

August 7, 6:00- 9:00 p.m.  National Night Out Celebration. Unity Reggae Band, Electronics recycling and much more in Harper’s Choice. Come out for the biggest National Night Out Celebration in Howard County. Visit the Harper’s Choice Community Association for more information.

August 11. 10:00 a.m.  WONDER WALK: Amazing Monarchs and Other Butterflies with Mike Raupp.  Monarchs of the butterfly world! Beautifully-garbed in colors advertizing toxic powers. Shiny gold-flecked chrysalises, caterpillars voraciously drinking strong potion-like milkweed juices. Thousands of miles of migration travel. What amazing little insects! Learn all about these and other wonderful butterflies from this passionate expert. Dr. Michael Raupp is Professor, Entomology, University of Maryland. Rain or shine. FREE.

August 12. 10:30 pm to 2:00 a.m. Night Sky/Dark Sky: The Perseid Meteor Showers with Dr. Alex Storrs from Towson University & Dr. Joel Goodman, Skydoc. Join other sky watchers as we search for meteors and learn about galaxies, constellations, and ways to limit our light-pollution of the skies. Every year, the earth passes through the debris cloud left by the comet Swift Tuttle. The earth’s atmosphere is bombarded by what is popularly known as “falling stars.” While the particles are the size of a grain of sand, they travel at 71 kilometers per second, putting on a brilliant show. In case of rain, program will be indoors. FREE.


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Jessica “JP” Protasio

“It’s cancer.” Around this time, two summers ago, I was diagnosed with cancer. Last summer, I celebrated a birthday I thought I’d never see. My life is ever-changing and growing. The opportunities I have to give back and share hope are amazing and innumerable. Yet, none of it would’ve been possible if not for the countless people who’ve been a part of my cancer journey. Next week, I grow a year older and find myself re-reading the first letter I received from my donor’s sister.

I remember receiving this letter in the examination room one month after my transplant. Sitting there with my surrogate mama, Dione, I twirled the letter between my fingertips and tried to keep myself from crying. I hadn’t opened the envelope yet. It appeared to be stained with tea or coffee, and tears. I took a breath and pulled out the card. Hallmark butterfly stationary, black, gold, delicate and damask. I never thought about it before, but a butterfly made sense.

This liver transplant was a metamorphosis from “end stage” to “rebirth.” An exchange of life happened that day. Our lives were changed forever. Here, I had been waiting for a liver, and there, a sister was waiting while her sibling passed. But who was she? Whose liver did I have?

“Dear Recipient,
 My sister had a kind soul and a kind heart so I know she would help ANYONE in their time of need. Our mother taught us the smallest act of kindness can make a world of difference–
and I hope with her donation she will be doing the same. I wish you many years of health and happiness. Please do not hesitate to contact my family.
 Thank you.”

She was a vibrant young woman with the world at her feet and promise at her fingertips. She loved her family and friends, and she was greatly beloved. She was a strong, kind woman who easily sacrificed in an effort to help anyone, friend or stranger, in need. Then, due to events still unknown to me, she passed. The Living Legacy Foundation worked with her surviving sister, who made the decision to donate her organs. The same night she made that decision, she wrote this letter to me, “Dear Recipient,” explaining her late sister’s heart. The woman who passed is my organ donor. She is the primary reason I have a functioning liver which replaced my own tumor-riddled organ. I recently learned her name: Tiffany.

I have this letter, correspond with her sister, and now, I have her name. I wrote a speech and delivered it to 1000 people last month at the 16th Annual Ceremony of Remembrance for the Living Legacy Foundation. The video I showed consisted of two-words over and over from around the world. These are the words that I live by: “Thank you.”

JP is a Children’s Instructor & Research Specialist at the Savage Branch of the Howard County Library System. She is a Pajama Time storyteller, wannabe triathlete, KPOP-addict, baker of cupcakes, and a cancer survivor.

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Dance Your Way to Fitness

Tired of feeling like a hampster on a treadmill?  Are you bored with your regular workout routine and looking to try something new? Why not try dancing?

Dancing is a great way for people of all ages to get in shape and stay in shape. Besides being a healthy form of exercise, dancing is a fun way to get out, socialize, and make new friends.  According to dancescape, dancing can increase your strength and flexibility, reduce chances of heart disease and diabetes, help prevent osteoporosis, decrease blood pressure, and improve memory and balance.  Dancing isn’t just good for the body, it is good for the mind. It can create a sense of well-being, reduce stress, and aid in weight loss. Most of all, dancing is fun!

In 2010, “So You Think You Can Dance” Executive Producer and Judge Nigel Lythgoe launched National Dance Day to encourage viewers to adopt healthy lifestyles through dancing. The same year, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton introduced a resolution to recognize the last Saturday of July as National Dance Day to promote physical fitness across the United States and promote First Lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move initiative.

Columbia Association (CA), in support of the Coalition for a Healthy Maryland, is hosting a National Dance Day celebration on Saturday, July 28, from 12-1 p.m. at SupremeSportsClub.  During this year’s event, CA Zumba® instructors will lead participants through the latest Zumba® and National Dance Day routines.  CA’s National Dance Day event is open to adults and children.  For more information, call Supreme Sports Club at 410-381-5355.

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Jessica Zellweger works in the Communications and Engagement Department at the Columbia Association (CA). She also works with the Watershed Management program at CA.

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By Angie Engles

Joseph Wood Krutch, American writer, critic, and naturalist once said, “Cats are rather delicate creatures and they are subject to a good many different ailments, but I have never heard of one who suffered from insomnia.”  Sadly, this is not the case for millions and millions of people across the world who suffer nightly from not sleeping.

Many people I know suffer so much from insomnia that they will try almost anything to get a good night’s sleep.  I know I have tried pretty much everything on the market to get over insomnia. To the uninitiated or inexperienced, insomnia is not all it’s cracked up to be. Sure, you can squeeze in a lot of the stuff you didn’t get done during the day (and in relative, peaceful quiet as well) or you can finally finish the rest of that mesmerizing book you’ve been dying to get back to.  But after its initial glory days, insomnia soon loses its highs and its shine, and you find yourself envying the nocturnally lucky and looking for a cure. Shopping for something that actually works and doesn’t leave you groggy in the morning is very tricky,  at times seemingly impossible. So let me start off right away by warning you away from the last over-the-counter drug that worked so well it proved too good to be true, for me, at least.

While Sleepinal lured me into some seemingly restful sleep, it made me pay for it the next morning and all through the day. I’ve been tempted to throw away my pills because I don’t want to use them again on a night when I’m desperate for ZZZs and have forgotten the damaging effects of taking just one. When I first swallowed Sleepinal, I immediately started to feel relaxed and my mind stopped buzzing with all those pesky thoughts that can keep me up at night. Soon I was drifting off and into a deep slumber. The problem was that it was very hard to wake coherently the next morning and I found my muscles heavy, my head spinning, and my thoughts mushy all afternoon and evening. Skip Sleepinal and look for other avenues. I highly recommend trying Sleepytime Tea by Celestial Seasonings instead.

With Celestial Seasonings Sleepytime Tea, I put two bags in water and let the tea sit for a good while before I start sipping. For added measure, I often have a very light snack of half a turkey sandwich and a small glass of milk. Herbal supplements such as GABA, which supports a calm mood, and Ashwagandha also may set the mood for a restful easy evening of sleep .
My medicine cabinet has seen a lot of sleep aids come and go over the years, none of which have stayed long (except for melatonin).  I’m  happy to say, though, that Irwin Naturals Power to Sleep, available at both Roots and David’s Natural Market, is a permanent resident. Normally when I am able to sleep at all (with previous supplements), I get up frequently during the night. With Power to Sleep, the most I’ve gotten up is once. Light sleepers should be pleased to discover this pill will “put you out” for the night without putting you out the next day. It appears to have the strength of prescription sleep medicine without having the harmful effects on my body and mind! I don’t find myself sleep-eating at midnight or waking up in the closet the next morning, though if I find myself needing a little lift, herbal tea wakes me up nicely.

Yogi Green Tea Blueberry Slim Life, Herbal Tea, which can be found at local health food and grocery stores, is the perfect way to rebound from those nights I do have trouble sleeping. I love this tea so much! It tastes great, gives me just the right of energy I need without wanting to dance on table tops or talk a mile a minute, and it curbs my appetite so I’m not tempted to snack during the middle of the day! I like it so much that I bulk up and buy more than one box at a time because it’s hard to find Yogi Green Tea Blueberry Slim Life at my local store.

Everyone reacts to things differently, but if you’re looking for energy and a way to keep hunger at bay, you may like this tea a lot! I also noticed (and it could be a coincidence) that the times I’ve started getting a cold and been drinking this, the germs don’t stand a chance! But we do react to things differently, and you may want to talk to your doctor before trying any of the things that have worked for me.  Either way, I wish you a good night’s sleep.

Angie Engles has been with the Howard County Library System for 17 years, 14 of which were at the Savage Branch. She currently works at the Central Branch primarily in the Fiction and Audio-visual departments. Her interests include music, books, and old movies.

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2012 CalendarJuly 22,   TriColumbia Kidz Triathalon at the Clemens Crossing Pool in Hickory Ridge Village. Register to compete or just come out and watch our youngsters compete in this Kidz –sized triathlon.

July 28, 10:00 a.m. WONDER WALK: Fairy Houses: Magic in the Woods. “The fields have fairies and the woods have ears…” In almost every culture there are ancient stories of tiny fairies that live in the woods and meadows. How magical? Have you ever built a house from natural findings for the fairies, hoping at least one might come to live there? Imagine acorn caps as wonderful sinks, bark as beautiful tables, pebbles in winding pathways, and moss as soft mattresses. Join Florence Miller and Audrey Suhr and build houses for the fairies at the Howard County Conservancy.

August 1, 7:00- 8:30 p.m. Sunset Serenades Summer Concert featuring the Kinderman.  Bring the kids and come out to Centennial Park with a picnic dinner, blanket or lawn chair and a sense of fun!  Call 410 313-4451 to check on the performance in case of inclement weather. Centennial Park, South. 1000 Route 108, Ellicott City.

August 2, 7:00-8:30 p.m. Traveling Bands Summer Concerts featuring The Jokers Wild.  If you ain’t got that swing… come on out to the Patapsco Female Institute and listen to the swing and jazz tunes of The Jokers Wild.  Sit back and relax or get up and dance to the music. Call 410 313-4451 to check on the performance in case of inclement weather. Patapsco Female Institute, 3655 Church Road, Ellicott City.

August 4-11. The 67th Howard County Fair. A celebration of Howard County’s farming past and present. Lots of family fun with horse and livestock shows, talent show, “Kids & Critters” Barn, Horse, Mule & Tractor Pulls, amusement rides, local entertainment, pony rides and much more.

August 7, 6:00- 9:00 p.m.  National Night Out Celebration. Unity Reggae Band, Electronics recycling and much more in Harper’s Choice. Come out for the biggest National Night Out Celebration in Howard County. Visit the Harper’s Choice Community Association for more information.

August 7, 7:00-8:30 p.m. Traveling Bands Summer Concert Series featuring the U.S. Air Force Max Impact.  North Laurel Park is the place to be to listen to the Rock/Pop sounds of Max Impact.  Join the Department of Recreation and parks for this great summer concert.  Bring a picnic dinner and a blanket or lawn chair. Call 410 313-4451 to check on the performance in case of inclement weather. North Laurel Park, 9411 Whiskey Bottom Road, Laurel.

August 8, 7:00- 8:30 p.m. Sunset Serenades Summer Concert featuring Pan Masters at Centennial Park.  Need a taste of the Caribbean?  Come and listen to the steel drums and Calypso music of Pan Masters.  Bring a picnic dinner, blanket or lawn chair and transport yourself to the islands. Call 410 313-4451 to check on the performance in case of inclement weather. Centennial Park, South. 1000 Route 108, Ellicott City.

August 11. 10:00 a.m.  WONDER WALK: Amazing Monarchs and Other Butterflies with Mike Raupp.  Monarchs of the butterfly world! Beautifully-garbed in colors advertizing toxic powers. Shiny gold-flecked chrysalises, caterpillars voraciously drinking strong potion-like milkweed juices. Thousands of miles of migration travel. What amazing little insects! Learn all about these and other wonderful butterflies from this passionate expert. Dr. Michael Raupp is Professor, Entomology, University of Maryland. Rain or shine. FREE.

August 12. 10:30 pm to 2:00 a.m. Night Sky/Dark Sky: The Perseid Meteor Showers with Dr. Alex Storrs from Towson University & Dr. Joel Goodman, Skydoc. Join other sky watchers as we search for meteors and learn about galaxies, constellations, and ways to limit our light-pollution of the skies. Every year, the earth passes through the debris cloud left by the comet Swift Tuttle. The earth’s atmosphere is bombarded by what is popularly known as “falling stars.” While the particles are the size of a grain of sand, they travel at 71 kilometers per second, putting on a brilliant show. In case of rain, program will be indoors. FREE.


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By Jason Pasquet

First, I would like to begin by inviting you to complete a little exercise for this introduction in order for you to get a small dose of personal experience with this psychology. Before you proceed, find a fairly quiet environment where you can relax and breathe naturally with ease. Begin by sitting on a comfortable chair or place of choice, and do exactly that for around one to three minutes. Clearing your mind, breathe gently in through your nose and out from your mouth. Next, recall a time when you’ve experienced a mildly embarrassing moment of some sort or an incident that made you ill at ease and took you out of your comfort zone for a little time. It can be a small displacement in your everyday life that surprised in a negative manner, or a particular confrontation with some person; just make sure the situation is a relatively minor disturbance and that it does not carry a weight of great importance.

See yourself in your mind’s eye and play the entire situation from start to finish. Recall and note what you saw, did, and felt during the specific time. Now, assume the part of a movie director, with the power to change anything you’d wish. With your new role, chose a particular song with a comical theme to it, or one you would probably never hear in the context of your situation. Then imagine you are seated, waiting to watch the scene unfold as you would watch a movie at a theater. Ready, set, and action! Replay the previous memory, and this time have the music playing loudly from the start to the end. Or perhaps you would like to have the entire scene be a cartoon show of some kind, like Bugs Bunny, or Popeye the sailor man. Recreate the scene and watch the movie again with the desired changes. Really get creative with this, and get into it to fully experience the process.

 

When you’re finished, recall the negative memory again that you chose prior to the distortion of the experience. Notice how you feel now? I can bet that your recollection of the memory is one of good humor and seems more like a joke than any view you held previously. If you’re thinking that this inner representation of your memory won’t last, try thinking about it in the weeks following today. You’ll find that the feelings will for the most part be altered because you’ve specifically “coded” your memory, like a program, to represent the conscious changes you placed in following the instructions given. If you didn’t feel any difference try the technique a few more times again. At the very least some of the discomfort will be relieved as an end result. Who knew it could be so simple, fast, and effective to change the way you view things by your own will? At least that is what I said jubilantly to myself when I first discovered this! Well my friends, you’ve just had a small taste of what NLP has to offer for you.

NLP, known as Neuro Linguistic Programming, is a revolutionary approach to how we look at and understand the structure of our minds and the behavioral outcomes we approach life with. It also has been defined in a multiplicity of ways, i.e., “NLP is an attitude and a methodology that leaves behind a trail of techniques” – co-founder John Grinder. It has also been labeled a user-manual for the brain and its complex layout of the interactions and perceptions to understand how we make sense of our world and ourselves. The technique you just did “Movie Music” is just one simple formula of the many creative methods that aid in facilitating change in people. NLP was created more as a better approach to therapy, helping to cure all kinds of phobias, to boost confidence, overcoming hard-to-change habits, relieving stress, and also for personal growth. However, it also breakthroughs to areas like relationships, business, and education, helping to manage and accomplish goals and communicate more effectively!

If you enjoyed this small exercise and you’re interested in learning about NLP, check the e-book Effective NLP Skills by Richard Youell and the book NLP: The New Technology of Achievement by Steve Andreas and Charles Faulkner. Both books are great sources to begin learning about the framework and attitudes that NLP embodies and to reap the benefits by applying it to different areas of your own life and with others. I also want to include a great online resource NLP University, which has a lot of very insightful NLP articles by Robert Dilts, a NLP developer and practitioner. These articles can provide greater understanding about basic fundamentals and important key terms. And look for future posts from me exploring NLP further.

Jason Pasquet is a Customer Service Specialist for Howard County Library System who aspires in the fields of psychology, psychiatry, and counseling.

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by Elizabeth Guertler Godfrey

My father often led us on long rambles through trackless woods where we flopped down on mossy banks, watching ants lug seeds homeward. “Imagine how the world must look to them. This moss is probably like palm trees and we are giants.” He made the woods seem at once magical and steadfast, wondrous and familiar.

“Appreciating the world around him”

In A Sense of Wonder, Rachel Carson describes encouraging her young nephew to explore with his senses and to appreciate the wonders around him. Labels and facts aren’t nearly as important as direct personal experiences that mold our understanding of our place on the planet.

Richard Louv, the author of The Last Child in the Woods and The Nature Principle, diagnoses much of modern society with “nature-deficit disorder.” According to many studies, Louv says, a host of ailments from ADHD to depression may be traced to a disassociation from the natural world. He suggests even adults may be de-stressed and renewed by reconnecting with it.

Wherever I live I find a “safe place,” some nearby green spot where I can go when troubles weigh too heavily, someplace to sit quietly and regain my balance. Looking up through tall oaks which have observed a century of changes or gazing into a stream continually flowing toward the sea keeps life in perspective.

When I taught school, my classes took nature walks every week. Even the most intractable children seemed comforted once we left the pavement behind. There is nothing like swinging on grapevines, wading in a cool creek or scrambling over rocks for ironing out emotional wrinkles and for tapping into the universe’s creativity. This summer, why not get out there and try it?

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Elizabeth Guertler Godfrey taught Kindergarten in Howard County Public Schools from 1976 to 2006. She is currently pursuing an MFA in Writing at Spalding University. Her essays have appeared in Smoky Mountain Living, Christian*New Age Quarterly and The Muse. She writes “On a Morning Walk”,  a blog of observations gleaned from daily walks with her dog

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by Barbara Cornell

I recently noticed several new titles on our “recently purchased” shelves here at the Howard County Library System—Glenwood Branch.  They caught my eye because they were all cookbooks with an international flavor.  This month’s post may look more like a cookbook review than my usual “grow it or buy it locally” exhortation.  You will still want to visit your local Farmers’ Market, but you may need to add a visit to Lotte Plaza!

I have been watching Kimchi Chronicles occasionally on Public Television, engaged by the way Marja Vongerichten visits Korea to explore her Korean roots.  Adopted by an American couple at age 3, she found that Korean food spoke to her and helped her connect with her birth mother.  In her new book The Kimchi Chronicles, 2011, she and her Alsatian-born chef husband, Jean-George, do a wonderful job making Korean cooking accessible to the American cook.  Marja starts with what is in her pantry.  The photos and explanations of essential Korean ingredients made me relax and think “I can do this!”  Adventuresome fans of blue crabs will enjoy the recipe for soy-marinated crabs on page 162.

Coquilles, Calva, & Creme: Exploring France’s Culinary Heritage: A love Affair with Real French Food, 2012, by G. Y. Dryansky, is, to quote one of the many endorsements “part memoir, part travelogue…a hymn to French food and wine.”  There are recipes here, but they are few and very far between.  Dryansky says that those chefs who did part with their recipes “had to scratch their heads to come up with the measures” because they cook without measuring–“au pif.”  We are instructed to use “a little less than a cup of cognac, 2 medium-size lobsters, …6 big tomatoes.”  But having just read The School of Essential Ingredients, a fictional book by Erica Bauermeister, I have great respect for the art of cooking by feel and intuition.  Were I to finish this book, I think I would have the sense of having completed a wonderful gastronomical tour of a country that truly respects food.

How about A Taste of Persia?  This is “an introduction to Persian cooking” by Najeieh K. Batmanglij who was called by The Washington Post “the guru of Persian cuisine.”  Batmanglij’s brief (16-page) history of Persia’s (now Iran) many conquests and assimilations makes the region and its cuisine seem so exotic that my appetite is getting ahead of me.  I’m glad the author includes an 11-page Dictionary of Persian Cooking.  This includes directions for preparing various staples such as syrups and spice mixes. There is also a list of Persian groceries and restaurants—6 are as close as Rockville.

Jeffrey Saad’s Global Kitchen: Recipes without Borders is a 2012 offering by the star of Cooking Channel’s United Tastes of America.  Saad teaches that you only need to understand the family of spices associated with a region’s cuisine—e.g.  chiles, cilantro, cumin, & Mexican oregano for Mexican food—in order to successfully produce their favorite dishes.  His chapters include Mexico, Middle East, Italy, France, Spain, Asia, India, and America, with chapters on eggs and desserts to finish off.  His writing style is very appealing and his instructions complete and easy to follow.  Not many of the dishes are illustrated but those that are look very tempting!

Our Farmers’ Market Chef class continues on the second Saturday of the month through September, meeting at the Glenwood Branch.  See you August 11, 10-11:30 am, for “Preserving the Bounty of the Season.”  Best to register ahead of time so we know how many to expect.

Barbara Cornell joined the Howard County Library System in 1993 as Assistant Branch Manager at the new Elkridge Branch.

Since 2000 she has enjoyed a shorter commute to the Glenwood Branch.


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2012 Calendar

July 12, 8:00-10 p.m.   Columbia Lakefront Stage. Tonight’s concert features Gary & The Groove, a good time rock and roll band that wants the audience to have a great time. Audience members are invited to join in with tambourine and maracas, and of course, dancing!

July 14, 10:00 a.m. WONDER WALK: What It Was Like to Live and Farm on This Land. Imagine the challenges of farming the Howard County Conservancy’s rolling hills over the last three hundred years. Success depended on being self-sufficient. Learn about the smokehouse, the ice-house, the blacksmith shop, the barns. What crops did the farmers plant and how did they harvest them? What animals did they raise and for what purposes? The Conservancy’s 
naturalists and the historians share stories of the land, the buildings, and what it was like for the Brown family ancestors to make their living on this land. In case of rain, check website. FREE.

July 14, 10:00 a.m. The Farmer’s Market Chef. Before visiting the Glenwood Farmers’ Market, discover creative ideas for using seasonal produce or CSA shares from our own FMC. Samples available. This month’s topic: Tomatoes and squash, exotic and heirloom — how to handle the excess. Register online or by calling 410.313.5577.

July 14, 1:00 p.m. Saturdays In The Garden. Explore fundamental concepts in environmental science at the Miller Branch by measuring, counting, and recording the plants and animals within the Enchanted Garden. Ages 11-17. No registration required.

July 14, 3:00 p.m. Y.a. Yoga. Learn about the physical and mental benefits of practicing yoga at the Savage Branch from a certified instructor from The Yoga Center of Columbia. Ages 11-17. No registration required.

July 16, 10:15-10:45 am. Just For Me. A class at the Savage Branch for children ages 3-5 who are ready for an independent class that includes creative expression, listening comprehension, and early reading skills. No registration required.

July 16, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Blood Pressure Screening. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring at the Glenwood Branch offered by Howard County General Hospital. 1st & 3rd Mondays. No registration required.

July 16, 7:00 p.m. Pizza Garden: Pizza Party. Come to the Miller Branch to explore pizza traditions in America. Experience the ingredients that make a delicious healthy pizza. Play pizza jeopardy, design a pizza, then celebrate by eating one. Refreshments. Ages 9-12; 60 min. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950

July 17, 6:00-9 p.m. Howard County Film “Feastival” at Clark’s Elioak Farm.  Enjoy local flavors and creative recipes from your favorite Howard County restaurants and farms.  Restaurants will be serving up samples of their Farm-2-Table menus and farmers will have fresh-from- the-field produce for purchase along with meats, cheeses and more! Visit fun, educational exhibits. View feature film American Meat, about a Virginia farmer leading a movement of meat producers who raise animals outdoors and without antibiotics. Showcasing farmers who believe sustainable meat production can meet the needs of consumers.

July 17, 10:30-11:00 a.m. Just For Me. A Class at the Glenwood Branch for children ages 3-5 who are ready for an independent class that includes creative expression, listening comprehension, and early reading skills. Register online or by calling 410.313.5579.

July 17, 7:00 p.m. Centering Guided Meditation. 
Enjoy a guided meditation at the Miller Branch that is designed to impart a feeling of peacefulness and connection. Part of a series presented by Star Ferguson, M.Ac., L.Ac. In addition to her Master’s degree in Acupuncture, Star Ferguson holds a Professional Certificate in Energetic Healing and is faculty at Tai Sophia Institute. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

July 18, 10:15 & 11:30 a.m. Safety First. Learn about food safety at the East Columbia Branch. Have a safe summer! Learn to protect yourself and stay safe for a happy summer vacation. Ages 5-8; 60 min. Tickets available at Children’s Desk 15-30 minutes before class.

July 18, 10:15 & 11:15 a.m. Just For Me. Classes at the Elkridge Branch for children ages 3-5 who are ready for an independent class that includes creative expression, listening comprehension, and early reading skills. 30 min. No registration required.

July 18, 10:30 a.m. Mini Milestones. Prepare your toddler as you learn about some mini milestones at the Glenwood Branch. Check hclibrary.org for weekly themes. Ages 18-36 months with adult; 30 min. Tickets ravailable at Children’s Desk 15-30 minutes before class

July 18- Aug 6. Howard County Farm-2-Table Restaurant Weeks. Enjoy twenty days of chef specialty menus locally inspired Farm-2-Table themes with fabulous FIXED PRICES from $10.12 to $40.12.  Visit Howard County Tourism for a list of participating restaurants.

July 18, 7:00- 8:30 p.m. Sunset Serenades Summer Concerts featuring Pyrates Royal (Maritime Swashbuckling) Come on out to the park with a picnic dinner, blanket and/or lawn chair, and join the Department of Recreation & Parks for their annual summer concert series in the park. Sit back and relax, get up and dance, or visit the Boat Dock and rent a canoe or paddleboat. In the case of inclement or extreme heat related weather, please call the Department’s program status line at 410-313-4451 after 4 p.m. on the day of the performance. Centennial Park South, 10000 Rt. 108, Ellicott City.

July 19, 11:30 a.m. Twist And Shout. Music and movement activities at the Savage Branch. Ages 2-5 with adult; 30 min. Register online or by calling 410.880.5978.

July 22,   TriColumbia Kidz Triathalon at the Clemens Crossing Pool in Hickory Ridge Village. Register to compete or just come out and watch our youngsters compete in this Kidz –sized triathlon.

July 28, 10:00 a.m. WONDER WALK: Fairy Houses: Magic in the Woods. “The fields have fairies and the woods have ears…” In almost every culture there are ancient stories of tiny fairies that live in the woods and meadows. How magical? Have you ever built a house from natural findings for the fairies, hoping at least one might come to live there? Imagine acorn caps as wonderful sinks, bark as beautiful tables, pebbles in winding pathways, and moss as soft mattresses. Join Florence Miller and Audrey Suhr and build houses for the fairies at the Howard County Conservancy.

August 4-11. The 67th Howard County Fair. A celebration of Howard County’s farming past and present. Lots of family fun with horse and livestock shows, talent show, “Kids & Critters” Barn, Horse, Mule & Tractor Pulls, amusement rides, local entertainment, pony rides and much more.

 

 

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Tell me you are not excited; July is National Blueberry Month. For real—here is the official proclamation and everything. So why the big hullabaloo?  There are all kinds of crazy National this and National that months (July is also National Doghouse Repairs Month; go on, Google it). But blueberries are something special. They are delicious, ranking second in popularity only to strawberries in terms of U.S. fruit consumption. They are also extremely versatile, being usable in almost every meal throughout the day, including beverages, and incorporated into both savory and sweet dishes. They can also be frozen without losing much of their nutritional value.

Tasty and versatile are just the tip of the blueberry bush. Blueberries are a low-calorie snack (about 84 calories to a cup) and are also considered one of the top superfoods. You can check out the wonder of  blueberries and some of the other “superfoods” in a number of books such as: Superfoods for Babies and Children, The 10 Things You Need to Eat: And More than 100 Easy and Delicious Ways to Prepare Them, Superfoods Healthstyle: Proven Strategies for Lifelong Health, and Superfoods for Healthy Kids: More Than 250 Immune-Boosting Foods and Great-Tasting Recipes for  Your Children. But, in a nutshell, Foods that Harm and Foods that Heal: An A-Z Guide to Healthy Eating indicates that blueberries are an excellent source of antioxidants, are packed full of vitamins C and A, may protect against heart disease and cancer, are a good source of dietary fiber, and help guard against some intestinal distress and urinary tract infections. In addition, there is some evidence to suggest blueberries might help preserve one’s memory.

So why not get in on this super-accessible superfood during prime time? There’s a reason that July is their month of honor—it’s blueberry-picking time. And there are plenty of pick-your-own places in Maryland. Picking your own combines outdoor exercise, family time, and a chance to literally get your hands on this delicious, little dynamo.

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Doris Cybert Wlcher, Lactation Consultant (left) and Sheila Donahue, Director of HCGH Women’s and Children’s Services

You may remember staggering around during those interminable nights as a brand new mom. Sleep deprivation, an equally clueless baby-daddy and an inconsolable infant made it easy to forget everything you knew about the benefits of breastfeeding and even easier to reach for that bottle of formula instead. Times have changed since I had my first baby at Howard County General Hospital and although breastfeeding was considered a good option back then, the encouragement and resources to successfully introduce new moms and babies to breastfeeding were limited. Today, as we jump-start a culture shift that favors breastfeeding, all of that is about to change.

Here in Maryland, we have one of the lowest breastfeeding rates and one of the highest rates of supplementation in the nation.  According to the Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) Breastfeeding Report Card, nearly 31 percent of infants in Maryland receive formula before they are two days old. (The national average is 24.5 percent) The CDC strongly supports breastfeeding as one of the most highly effective preventative measures a mom can take to protect the health of her child. According to the CDC, “In the United States, although most mothers hope to breastfeed, and 75 percent of babies start out being breastfed, only 15 percent are exclusively breastfed six months later.” In response to these and other statistics, the National Initiative for Children’s Healthcare Quality (NICHQ) has launched a “Best Fed Beginnings” program. The 22-month intensive program helps hospitals achieve a “Baby-Friendly” designation. The designation is awarded to hospitals that have successfully implemented the American Academy of Pediatrics-endorsed Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. In the United States, there aren’t very many hospitals with this designation. Of the approximately 20,000 hospitals worldwide that have attained the Baby-Friendly designation, only 143 are in the U.S.

Howard County General Hospital (HCGH), designated as one of 90 hospitals nationwide to participate in the “Best Fed Beginnings” program, has been a supportive voice for breastfeeding. Dr. Tuvia Blechman, Chairman of Pediatrics and Medical Director of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at HCGH, explained, “Howard County General is unique in that we see more than 90 percent of new mothers breastfeeding while in the hospital following delivery. The strong support services and breastfeeding programs we have in place make it possible for these new mothers to continue successfully breastfeeding long after they leave us, which is very beneficial for both baby and mother.”  The support services include a team of physicians, lactation consultants and maternal nurses with special training in lactation. This team works together to support a new mother’s choice to breastfeed and encourages new mothers to get answers to questions about breastfeeding during their hospital stay.

While the hospital works to improve breastfeeding statistics, it will always do so with the understanding that breastfeeding may not be the best alternative for every mom or every baby. But for the new moms who have the choice, I’m glad HCGH will be there to support and encourage you as you undertake one of the hardest but most rewarding aspects of motherhood.

View the video below to hear about breastfeeding from the perspective of a young mother who recently delivered at Howard County General Hospital:

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Mary Catherine Cochran is a big believer in communications and the critical role that it plays in community building.  (Although she is still adjusting to doing it in 140 characters or less!) When she isn’t busy truncating the message, she works as a Senior Communications Project Manager at Howard County General Hospital: Johns Hopkins Medicine where, among other things, she manages and writes for the Well & Wise blog.

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Good Grief?

by Shep Jeffreys

What is this thing called grief? What should we expect from grieving people and how can we help them – or ourselves? What resources are available in our community?

Join me at 7:00 p.m., on July 23 at the Central Branch of the Howard County Library where I will answer these questions, and read several poems from my book, Helping Grieving People–When Tears Are Not Enough, about my own and my family’s grief journey after the death of our son Steven at age eight.  Here are some thoughts in the meantime.

WHAT IS GRIEF? “My friends say that I should be over this by now! – How long does grief take?” “Shep, am I doing this right?” “Am I going crazy? All I do is cry and cry.” These, and oh so many more similar questions, are asked by my clients. Answers are very individual but there are some general understandings of what human grief is and what role it plays in reclaiming some life after a death, a scary diagnosis, layoff or other of life’s many painful and tragic losses. There is no one right way to grieve.

HOW CAN I HELP? Friends and family of bereaved persons frequently ask, “What should I say? What can I do to help her or him or them?” Most of us feel helpless in the face of a tragic loss because we cannot fix it. There are many ways to help specifically but showing up is an important part of supporting grieving people. Never underestimate the value of human presence. We will review a number of do’s and don’ts and ways to prepare to be with a grieving friend or family member.

WHO ARE THE GRIEVERS? WHO ARE THE INVISIBLE GRIEVERS? There are special needs of certain people based on their stage in life and their relationship to the deceased loved one. Bereaved children, parents, older adults and widowed all have specific, as well as general support needs. I call the terminally ill, disabled and their families the invisible grievers, because they are frequently out of sight, down the block, behind closed doors, as we were for three years during Steven’s battle with cancer.

There will be opportunities for you to share and ask questions. Oh yes, we will also look at the benefits of denial, avoidance and humor.  We may also be doing some laughing. Registration for this program is free but required.  410-313-7800

J. Shep Jeffreys, Ed.D., F.T., is a licensed psychologist specializing in grief, loss, and end-of-life concerns. He holds the Fellow in Thanatology level of certification from the Association for Death Education and Counseling. In addition to maintaining a private practice at the Family Center, Columbia, MD, he is on staff at Howard County General Hospital, is assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where he provides seminars on loss, grief and bereavement for psychiatric residents and medical students; and is an affiliate assistant professor of pastoral counseling at Loyola University Maryland, where he teaches the Loss and Bereavement course. His current book is Helping Grieving People–When Tears Are Not Enough: A Handbook For Care Providers (2011); and he is also author of Coping With Workplace Grief: Dealing With, Loss, Trauma and Change, 2nd Edition. His column, Grief Psychologist’s Corner, is a regular feature in Living With Loss magazine. For 14 years he worked with Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, M.D., and for 12 years served as consulting psychologist in the Johns Hopkins AIDS Service. Shep can be found on the web at GriefCareProvider.com and you can read more on his blog.

 


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We certainly all hope we’ve made it through the worst of the summer heat, and that none of us will see another streak quite like the past few weeks. But even if we don’t reach ridiculous temperatures, there’s always a risk that comes with the hot weather and there are steps you can take to minimize that risk.

  1. Drink plenty of non-alcoholic fluids, and avoid anything high in sugar. And drink frequently to stay ahead of your thirst.
  2. Wear clothing that is lightweight, light colored, and loosely fitting.
  3. Once the temperature reaches 90° F,  an electric fan isn’t nearly as effective as a cool shower or bath.
  4. Limit activity outdoors to the morning or evening.
  5. When outside, rest often and in the shade.
  6. Follow sun safety precautions, including wearing wide-brimmed hats, sunglasses, and wide-spectrum (SPF 15+) sunscreen.

You should also stay indoors when possible, preferably somewhere with air-conditioning, such as any one of the Howard County Library System’s branches.

According to the CDC, there are several types of heat illnesses to watch out for:

Heat stroke occurs because your body can no longer regulate its own temperature. Unable to sweat to cool down, your body temperature can rise above 106° F in under 15 minutes.  Symptoms include red, hot, dry skin; rapid and strong pulse; throbbing headache; dizziness; nausea; and confusion. Once these symptoms occur, the victim has to be cooled rapidly (e.g. put the person in a cool bath or shower, spray them with a hose or wrap them in a cool sheet but should not be given fluids.  Get medical help as soon as possible as heat stroke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not given.

Heat exhaustion can develop after several days of exposure to high temperatures and lack of fluids. The elderly, those with high blood pressure, and people working in a hot environment are at high risk of heat exhaustion. Symptoms include heavy sweating, paleness, muscle cramps, fatigue, dizziness, headache, nausea, vomiting, and fainting. Skin may be cool and moist, pulse fast and weak, and breathing fast and shallow. Help cool off the victim, and seek medical attention if symptoms worsen or last longer than an hour.

Heat cramps usually happen after you sweat profusely from strenuous activity and may be symptoms of heat exhaustion. Symptoms include muscle pains or spasms, often in the stomach, arms or legs. If you notice heat cramps, stop all activity immediately, drink plenty of fluids and sit down in a cool place. If the cramps do not stop within an hour, seek medical attention.

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2012 CalendarJuly 9, 10:15 – 10:45 a.m. Just For Me. A class at the Savage Branch for children ages 3-5 who are ready for an independent class that includes creative expression, listening comprehension, and early reading skills. No registration required.

July 9, 12:30 – 3:oo p.m. Free Blood Pressure Screening. Free, walk-in blood pressure screening and monitoring at the Savage Branch offered by Howard County General Hospital. 2nd Mondays. No registration required.

July 9, 4:30 & 7:00 p.m. Enchanted Gardeners. Discover the Enchanted Garden’s delights at the Miller Branch. Ages 5-8; 45 min. Tickets available at Children’s Desk 15-30 minutes before class.

July 10, 10:30 – 11:00 a.m. Just For Me. A class at the Glenwood Branch for children ages 3-5 who are ready for an independent class that includes creative expression, listening comprehension, and early reading skills. Register online or by calling 410.313.5579.

July 11, 10:15 & 11:15 a.m. Just For Me. Classes at the Elkridge Branch for children ages 3-5 who are ready for an independent class that includes creative expression, listening comprehension, and early reading skills. 30 min. No registration required.

July 11, 10:30 a.m. Mini Milestones. Prepare your toddler at the Glenwood Branch as you learn about some mini milestones. Check hclibrary.org for weekly themes. Ages 18-36 months with adult; 30 min. Tickets available at Children’s Desk 15-30 minutes before class.

July 11, 7:00 p.m. Fall Veggies. PA Gardening class at the Miller Branch presented by Kent Phillips. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

July 13, 10:15 a.m. Funtastic Fridays. Have FUN at the East Columbia with art, science, music, or a favorite storybook character. Ages 3-5; 45 min. Tickets available at Children’s Desk 15-30 minutes before class.

July 13, 1:00 & 2:00 p.m. Little Ninjas. Sykesville Tae Kwon Do Academy students demonstrate Little Ninjas moves at the Miller Branch. Ages 5-7; 30 min. Register online or by calling 410.313.1950.

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by Jessica “JP” Protasio

Inspiration. Where do you find it? Where does it come from? What is it, really? 
It’s a noun. It’s an ephemeral feeling that we come across after hearing a person’s story of overcoming. It’s something we look for and try to cling to when we’re tired of the monotony or hardships of this life. It is the thing that stems from hope. It is the thing that wells up inside you and spills out into your actions. It is what makes you want to do something more than just enjoy it. It is a kind of motivation that precedes the first steps into a new adventure.

We’re all capable of feeling and perhaps being a vessel of inspiration. One of the things I’ve heard over the last year is, “You’re such an inspiration.” Which is usually followed by, “How do you stay so positive?” I always want to laugh. Not out of disrespect, but at the notion that I have done something special. I don’t feel like I’ve done anything remarkable. I got cancer, had a liver transplant, and am taking steps to make my life a healthier one.

Two-thirds of those things were beyond my control. There is no doubt that I’m proud of my cancer journey and am grateful for the second chance at life I’ve been given via the transplant. But, sometimes I struggle accepting those compliments because so many others ran out of time in their battle with cancer. Yet, I still believe that we should celebrate life, whether of someone just coming into the world or having already left it. Living and dying is something we all do and will do. But, that  part of living a healthy life, that’s something we do in transition. I don’t make the best decisions every day and I do get discouraged and want to give up at times. But the thing that is so special is that I recognize the journey. I can enjoy those moments after a hard workout and feel satisfaction at a tasty AND healthy meal that I made. I can also call upon that terrible feeling of falling short when I’ve missed a training session or ate that cheeseburger and was sick for two days. It’s the good and the bad together and coping with it all that makes the journey special. Recognizing that inspiration comes not only from outside ourselves but within ourselves. Knowing a better version of us exists.

The journey of living well is one that takes place in every part of our day. Whether at rest or at play, our choices alter our bodies’ chemistry in some way. It’s not just about food and exercise though, it’s about attitude. When I read The Fault in Our Stars by John Green, I felt myself in the two main characters: the dichotomy living through dying–understanding the burden of impending death but finding freedom in loving the life I was leading, but also wanting to pursue a life worthy of remembering.

This summer, I hope you find some great books, have some memorable experiences, and make some healthy changes in your life…because, you only get one–it might as well be an inspiration. :D

JP is a Children’s Instructor & Research Specialist at the Savage Branch of the Howard County Library System. She is a Pajama Time storyteller, wannabe triathlete, KPOP-addict, baker of cupcakes, and a cancer survivor.

 

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Ray Rice brings “A Ray of Hope’

HOWARD COUNTY, MD. (www.hocowellandwise.org)- You are cordially invited to attend the July 13 “A Ray of Hope” pro-kindness, anti-bullying, teen suicide outreach at Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia Maryland.

This is the second anti-bullying event that Ray Rice, a running back for the Baltimore Ravens, has hosted in the community. (The first event was at Howard High School in April). Ray Rice is hoping to fill the house with a capacity crowd. (The Pavilion holds 20,000 people!)

Mr. Rice will be joined by Teen Truth Live at the July 13th event. Teen Truth Live is an award winning program featuring an interactive multi-media assembly experience which will teach students to identify the different forms of bullying, understand how bullying can lead to serious consequences, and motivate students to stop bullying from happening in their school. The motivational presentation will air a student-created 22-minute film. The award-winning film, Teen Truth: Bully, is an explosive film that according to the website, “forces its audience to think differently about bullying and school violence, telling the truth, and the impact we have on each other every day.” The film has been viewed by over 1.7 million people thus far. The entire presentation will challenge students to think about how their actions and reactions impact the lives of those around them. Although the event is open to all children and adults and will use humor and storytelling, the program contains content that may not be suitable for all viewers and parental discretion is strongly advised for children under 13. Children under the age of 13 must be accompanied by a parent or guardian for admittance to the event.

The event is free and open to the public regardless of where you live. No tickets are required for entry but please RSVP by visiting Ray Rice’s website at www.RayRice27.com and click on the event information in righthand column. An accurate headcount is needed to provide appropriate accommodations. For more information you can also visit Ray Rice’s facebook page.

Doors will open at 6pm. There will be music and entertainment prior to the program and chances to win prizes. There will be many community oriented vendor booths to visit. The program begins at 7pm and is expected to last one and one-half hours.

Attendees are asked to bring non-perishable food items to donate to the local food bank. Donations are appreciated but are not required for admission.


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Healthy Pregnancy Tips

Maintain a healthy pregnancy for a healthy mom and baby.

As an obstetrician and gynecologist in Howard County, I have participated in the care of many women and their pregnancies and I was excited to read about the new shift in perspective toward diet and pregnancy in the Baltimore Sun article, “Diets suggested for more pregnant women.” It saddens me to see that some women gain 60-70 pounds in pregnancy. Many fail to lose the weight afterwards. This may be due to the continuation of unhealthy eating habits that began either during or prior to the pregnancy. With a newborn in the house, less sleep, more stress and lack of time make exercise and eating healthy difficult.

Obesity is an epidemic in America. Approximately 34 percent of Americans over the age of 20 are obese according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, including about 36 percent of non-pregnant females. This is a 10 percent increase from 15 years ago. Obesity is defined as having a body mass index (BMI) of greater than 30. Another 34 percent of American Adults are overweight, as defined by a BMI of 25-30, and nearly six percent are extremely obese with a BMI of greater than 40.

While weight gain is a normal part of pregnancy, gaining 60-70 pounds is excessive. According to the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the recommended weight gain during a pregnancy should be 25-35 pounds for normal weight women, 15-25 pounds for overweight women and 15 pounds or less for obese women. Unfortunately, many women do experience cravings during their pregnancy and many feel it is okay to indulge during pregnancy since “you are eating for two.” This is a misleading and antiquated attitude. Many women also are more sedentary in pregnancy due to the surge of hormones, weight gain and anemia. Over-eating and decreased exercise feed into the vicious cycle.

Obesity in pregnancy can lead to higher risk of gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, macrosomia, difficulty with fetal monitoring, higher Caesarean-section rates, and increased surgical and anesthesia complication rates. There also is increased fetal risk of neural tube defect, prematurity and stillbirth.

While the Baltimore Sun article talked about weight loss for obese women in pregnancy, it is important to note that currently there are no studies proving that weight loss is safe during pregnancy. Dieting is not the solution in pregnancy; instead, a healthy diet should be stressed. Additionally, an active lifestyle during pregnancy is encouraged for most healthy patients. Walking, running, stationary bicycling, swimming, low impact aerobics and prenatal exercise are not only safe during most pregnancies, but recommended.

More young women are undergoing bariatric surgery than ever before. While this surgery may be the only solution for some women to get to a healthy weight, it is important to point out that bariatric surgery is not without risk. Those patients who have a past history of bariatric surgery should not consider pregnancy during the initial 12-18 months after surgery. Most bariatric patients are nutrition deficient in B 12, folate, calcium and iron. Pregnancy complications are increased in these women; however, it is important to note that diabetes and hypertension are reduced.

Ideally, women should get into the habit of healthy eating and achieve a healthy weight prior to pregnancy. Portion-controlled eating, choosing more fresh vegetables, lean meat, complex carbohydrates and less processed food are the desired ways to keep the weight in check. Exercise further revs up the metabolism. In the end, it is more difficult to lose the weight postpartum than it is to limit weight gain in the first place.

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Wenjie Sun, M.D. is a graduate from Wofford College, Summa Cum Laude in Chemistry Science. She earned her M.D. from University of South Carolina, School of Medicine. She then entered residency at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. She joined the Signature OB/GYN practice in 2007. She was Board Certified in 2010 and was named to the Chesapeake Family Magazine’s 2011 List of Favorite Doctors!

 


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Word of the day: Derecho

Howard County was hit hard by a derecho on Friday and many are still without power.  County officials report that nearly 50,000 homes have been restored and that there are still 9,000 to go. For more information check out the BGE website. Houses still out may still take days to restore, but all County traffic signals are back in service.

The Howard County number to report storm related 410.313.2900.

Cleaning out the refrigerator? Is it safe to eat?!  The Washington Post has a great article about what you can keep and what you need to throw away.

Patch added new resources to their list of places to stay cool and has included a list of urgent care centers in Howard County.  Check it out!

As Recovery Efforts Continue, Firefighters & Paramedics Urge Residents to Take Necessary Safety Precautions

As recovery efforts continue, HCDFRS is reminding citizens to take the necessary precautions to keep themselves and their families safe.

“Often we see a rise in carbon monoxide poisoning, fires and other accidents after a major storm has hit,” said Fire/EMS Chief William Goddard. “That’s why we are out in the community going door-to-door in order to equip people with tools to keep themselves out of harm’s way.”

As power continues to be restored throughout the region, we ask residents to remember the following safety tips:

  • Turn off and unplug all appliances, stoves and other electrical devices so that electrical fires don’t spark up once the power is restored. Do not leave the home without turning off devices.
  • We recommend using a battery-powered flashlight, but if you must use candles, make sure they are inside a holder that is sturdy, and won’t tip over easily. Put candle holders on a sturdy, uncluttered surface.
  • Never use a candle if oxygen or some sort of gas tank is used in the home.
  • Generators should be used in well ventilated locations outside of the home and away from all doors, windows and vent openings.
  • Never use a generator in an attached garage, even with the door open.
  • Place generators so that exhaust fumes can’t enter the home through windows, doors or other openings in the building.
  • Make sure you have a working carbon monoxide (CO) detector in your home. Check it regularly during power outages and make sure it has back-up batteries.
  • Turn off generators and let them cool down before refueling. Never refuel a generator while it is running.
  • Do not burn yard waste and tree debris leftover from the storm; however this debris can be recycled
  • If you notice downed electrical lines, DO NOT TOUCH THEM; report it immediately by calling 9-1-1 and the local BGE emergency line at 1-800-685-0123

For additional information, safety tips and updates follow HCDFRS on Twitter & Facebook at www.twitter.com/hcdfrs  or www.facebook.com/hcdfrs

 

Water Resources:  For those on wells and with no power- the Water Buffalo is back today at the Gary J. Arthur Community Center, 2400 Route 97 in Cooksville, from 10 am-8 pm. Bring clean containers to fill with drinkable water.

Cool Places to Spend the Day:

Volunteer Fire stations: The following Volunteer Fire Station’s have invited residents to stop by today for a place to cool down and/or take a shower. BOTH West Friendship Station (12535 Old Frederick Rd, 5 am-9 pm) and Clarksville Station (5000 Signal Bell Ln, 5-9 pm) are open as cooling centers and shower locations – bring your own towels and toiletries. The Lisbon Station (1330 Woodbine Rd.) is offering residents a place to cool off and go to the restroom, NO SHOWERS, from 8 am-10 pm.

Columbia pools: CA is offering free access to their outdoor pools to all Howard County residents that are without power until the power comes back.  Such a great community partner! Stay cool! The Dickinson Pool now has power but Phelps Luck is closed and is without power.

Howard County Libraries:  Open M-Th 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Fridays and Saturdaays  10:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m.

  • Central Branch:  10375 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia MD 21044. 410.313.7800
  • East Columbia Branch:  6600 Cradlerock Way, Columbia MD 21045.  410.313.7700
  • Elkridge Branch Library: 6540 Washington Blvd Elkridge, MD 21075.  410.313.5077
  • Glenwood Branch:  2350 State Route 97 Cooksville, MD 21732.  410.313.5577
  • Savage Branch:  9525 Durness Lane Laurel, MD 20723.  410.880.5979
  • Miller Branch: 9421 Frederick Road, Ellicott City, MD 21042 410.313.1950

Howard County Community Cooling Centers:

  • Gary J. Arthur Community Center in Glenwood, 2400 Route 97, Cooksville. 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • North Laurel Community Center. 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. (NO PHONES OR INTERNET)
  • Roger Carter Center, 3676 Fel’s Lane, Ellicott City. 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Community Recreation Center, Cedar Lane Park West, 5081 Cedar Lane (leashed or crated pets welcomed). 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Senior Centers:

  • Bain Center, 5470 Ruth Keeton Way, Columbia. 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
  • East Columbia Senior Center, 6600 Cradlerock Way, Columbia. 9 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
  • Elkridge Senior Center, 6540 Washington Blvd., Elkridge. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Ellicott City Senior Center 9401 Frederick Road, Ellicott City.8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
  • Longwood Senior Center, 6150 Foreland Garth, Columbia .9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Glenwood Senior Center, 2400 Route 97, Cooksville. 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
  • North Laurel Senior Center, 9411 Whiskey Bottom Road, Laurel. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Schools and Summer Camp Closings For TUESDAY, JULY 3: 14 schools and multiple summer camp sites are out of power including:

Elementary Schools

  • Bollman Bridge
  • Bushy Park
  • Fulton
  • Hammond
  • Waverly

Middle Schools

  • Glenwood
  • Hammond
  • Lime Kiln
  • Patuxent Valley

High Schools and Special Schools

  • Glenelg
  • Hammond
  • Howard
  • Reservoir
  • Cedar Lane

Trash and Recycling: Trash collection is on schedule for tomorrow, July 2. However, there will be no recycling collection. Stay tuned for more updates regarding services. If your recycling day is Monday, pickup will be next week. A slide schedule will be in effect for the remainder of the week due to the July 4 holiday; however, you can also take your recyclables to the Alpha Ridge Landfill located at 2350 Marriottsville Road. Note, the landfill will have extended hours on Monday/Tues. of this week from 7:30 AM-6 PM.

Check out the Howard County Facebook Page for information on road closures and up to the minute information.Rd


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Happy Independence Day!  We encourage you to have a blast (pun intended), but we would also like to remind you that nothing ruins a good time like an unexpected trip to the police station or the emergency room. First off, please be aware that not all fireworks are permitted in Maryland; see WTOP‘s handy county-to-county breakdown. In fact, Howard county only permits the use of sparklers, party poppers, snaps and pops, and snakes.

If, however, you do wish to indulge in a little explosive or at least sparkly fun, we’d also like to help you to keep all your fingers and toes. Here are some tips to help from The National Council on Fireworks Safety:

•    Use fireworks outdoors only.
•    Obey local laws. If fireworks are not legal where you live, do not use them.
•    Always have water handy (a hose or bucket).
•    Only use fireworks as intended. Don’t try to alter them or combine them.
•    Never relight a “dud” firework. Wait 20 minutes and then soak it in a bucket of water.
•    Use common sense. Spectators should keep a safe distance from the shooter and the shooter should wear safety glasses.
•    Alcohol and fireworks do not mix. Have a “designated shooter.”
•    Only persons over the age of 12 should be allowed to handle sparklers of any type.
•    Do not ever use homemade fireworks of illegal explosives: they can kill you. Report illegal explosives to the fire or police department in your community.
So have a safe holiday as well as a fun one.  And if you really want to enjoy the excitement of fireworks, why not attend one of the many professional displays put on in the area.  Not only will you be safer, but you won’t have to bother with the clean-up afterward…talk about freedom.

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